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SOD? 1200130 fi 

Calilomla Stale Llbraiy 



The Special Organ of " Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Co.""Fred. Marriott, Patentee. 



Prie» pT OopTt 10 C«at».l 



ESTABLISHED JUI.T, 80, 18S8. 



tABim»l BnlMorlptioBi M. 



•** '^^'•e© 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OP CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST; 



Vol. 29. 



SAN FSANOISOO, SATUEDAT, JULY 20, 1878. 



No. 1. 



once of Ibe San Frnurlsco News I^etter, Merchant Street, 

Nob. 607 to 615, San Francisco. 

GOLD BARS— 800@915— Silver Bars— 6@1C ^ cent. disc. Treasury 
Notes are selHnff at par. Buying, 99f. Mexican Dollars, 7i@8 per 
per cent, nominal. Trade Dollars, 2J@2J per cent, discount. 

jW Exchange on New York, ^ per cent, for Grold ; Currency, 100. On 
London, Bankers, 49Jd.^i!49g; Commercial, 49id.@49§d. Paris, 5 
francs per dollar. Telefrrams, §@5 per cent. 

Latest price of Gold at New York, July 19th, at 3 P.M., 100§. Latest 
■ "' @.486^. 

3@1 per cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
D, ' • 



t pri' 
price of Sterling, 483i@486^. 



" Price of Money here, 
open market, l®!^. 



demand active. 



PBICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVEBKMEHT BONDS. 

San Francisco July 19, 1878. 



Stocks and Bonds. 
U. S. Bonds, 5-20S 18G7-CS., 

Legal Tender Notes.*. 

S. F. City & Co. B'ds, (is, "58 

S. F. City Bonds, 7s 

Sacrament*.* City Bonds.., 
Tuba County Bonds, 8s. . 
San Mateo Co. Bonds, 7s. 

S. F. Gas Light Co 

National G. B'k & Trust Co. 
Spring Valley Water Co. , 



Bid. 


Asked 1 


105J 
998 


106 


m 


101 




107 





30 





100 





102 


104 


90 


924 

SO ! 


944 


95 [■ 


Breckij 


RIDOB & 



Stocks and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co. 
Front St. , M. & 0. R. R. Co. 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad 



Asked 
25 
70 
70 

110 
115 



Yost, Brokers, 304 Montgomery street. 



THE STOCK MAKKET. 

The market opened moderately active at the commencement of the 
week, and prices gradually hardened, until at the close the greatest ex- 
citement prevailed over the north end stocks, the balance of the market 
being comparatively neglected. The news from Ophir is most flattering. 
Drillings obtained from cross-cut No. 2 on the 2,000-foot level are said to run 
up in the hundreds, but no reliable information on this point can be had. 
The cross-cut is now in a distance of about 45 feet, and will probably reach 
the ore body to-morrow. Under reported favorable news from Sierra 
Nevada that stock scored a rapid advance under heavy purchases for ac- 
count of insiders. The indications would seem to justify a still further 
advance. Private advices have been received to the effect that the ore 
assays over SSO, and the continual absorption of the stock at steadily ad- 
vancing rates would seem to indicate that the price is based upon merit. 
At the close the market showed a slight shading off in prices, but other- 
wise the advance was well sustained. 

PACIFIC MAH. AND UNION PACIFIC. 

It is pleasant to announce that the threatened war between the Pa- 
cific Mail and Union Pacific Companies will probably be averted by mu- 
tual concession. Such a rupture could have ended in no good, as the 
contract as heretofore existing has redounded to the benefit of both com- 
panies, and both could not fail to be injured to some extent by breaking 
it. The Pacific Mail Co. has doubless the stronger hold on the people of 
the Pacific slope, owing to its long establishment here, as well as to the 
popularity of the present San Francisco agency. But the Pacific Mail 
Company itself would suffer by its own action. The public may re- 
gard the patching up of hostilities with disfavor because of any temporary 
reduction of freight prices which the opposition might bring about. But 
in the end the public would be the loser, as such differences all end sooner 
or later, and the contestants are very prone to avenge themselves for their 
own foolishness on the purse-carrier — the dear public. 

For the Orient— P. M. S. S. City of Peking.— This fine steamship 
sails this day for Hongkong via Yokohama, carrying passengers, Govern- 
ment Mails, 8500,000 in Treasure, and for cargo. Quicksilver, 174 flasks, 
valued at 860,000 ; Flour, 41,246 qurs., 180 hfs., and 421 bbls., equal in 
bulk to 11,072 bbls., valued at 857,120. The total value of the merchan- 
dise cargo to China was $188,900 ; to Japan, 840,000 . 

The Orizaba will take the excursionists to Santa Cruz to-day, at 1 P. 
M. Returning, leave Santa Cruz Sunday night. 



Rural Visitors. — During the Summer months parties going into the 
country to the Springs, etc., can have the News Letter sent them for a 
week or longer by prepaying for the same at the oflBlce, C09 Merchant 
street. 

LATEST ATOMS OF NE^TS OF FACT AND THOUGHT 



Our latest inclosures from London give us the following "Telephonic 
Improvements:" "Professors HoiiBton and Thomson have developed an 
apparatus which combines in its action certain principles not heretofore 
used. They thus obtain an increase in the volume and an improvement 
in the quality of the sound. The iron diaphragm supports at its center a 
small point ot plumbago. This point dips into a mercury globule placed 
in a suitable cavity in the end of the iron core nearest the diaphragm. 
The iron core has on it a primary coil, which forms part of a battery cir- 
cuit, in which come the variable resistances — the plumbago point and the 
mercury globule. On speaking, the vibration of the diaphragm causes the 
point to dip more or less into the mercury, and thus to increase or de- 
crease the resistance of the circuit. By this means an increase of the pri- 
mary current occurs when the point makes better contact, producing an 
increase of magnetism in the iron core, causing a still further approach of 
the diaphra^on and increase of current, till the elasticity of the diaphragm 
eq,uilibriates the attraction of the magnet. When the diaphragm recedes, 
opposite effects are produced. The changes thus produced give rise to in- 
ductive currents in the secondary coil, which pass into the line and the 
receiving instruments. It is evident that any variation in the primary 
current consequent on the motion of the'diaphragm reacts to increase such 
variations; while the induced current in the secondary still further reacts 
to increase the effects. Hence the instrument has been called the reac- 
tion telephone." 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, July 19th, 
1878.— Gold opened at lOOg; 11 A.M., at lOOg ; 3 p.m, at lOOg. United 
States Bonds — Five-twenties of 1867, 105| ; 1881, 107i. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 83^4 86^, short. Pacific Mail, —. Wheat, 81 15@S1 25, strong. 
Western Union, 92i. Hides, steady, fair demand, 19@19i. Oil— Sperm, 
86@88. Winter Bleached, 97® 105. Whale Oil, 40@45; "Winter 
Bleached, 51@58. Wool— Spring, fine, 18@26 ; Burry. 10@14 ; Pulled, 
24@35 ; Fall Clips, 15@20 ; Burry, 14@17. London, July 19th.— Liver- 
pool Wheat Market, 10s. @ 10s. 3d. Club, lOs. 3d. @ 10s. 8d. United 
States Bonds, 108J@1065. Consols, 95 7-16@96 9-16. 

Beerbohm's Telegram. — London and Liverpool, July 19, 1878. — 
Floating Cargoes, turn dearer ; Cargoes on Passage, ditto; Mark Lane 
Wheat, steady; Liverpool Spot Wheat, quiet; No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 
,43b. ; ditto, for shipment, 39s. 6d.@40s. ; Bed Winter Off Coast, 46s. 6.; 
California Off Coast, 49s. ; ditto, nearly due, 48s. 6d.; ditto, just shipped, 
463.; ditto. Club, lOs. 3d.@103. 7d. ; ditto, Average, 93. lld.@.103. 3d.; 
Red Western Spring, 8s. 9d.@9s. 3d. ; English Country Markets, firm; 
French Country Markets, general^ dearer; American State Flour in 
London, 23s. 6d. ; American State Flour in Liverpool, 23s. 6d. ; Gold, f ; 
Sterling Exchange, 83^@86^. 

Anotherexcellentappointment has just been made by the Pacific 
Mail S. S. Co., in giving command of the CHj/ of Peking to Captain J. 
M. Cavarly. This gentleman was formerly Commander of the steamer 
Georgia, running between this port and Panama, and more recently was 
Captain of the City of New York, running to Australia. He is one of 
the oldest and best Captains we have, and has our best wishes for his 
continued prosperity. 

"Public Opinion" of London says: Professor Gunning, of California, 
has made a new discovery of mineral treasures in that State. _ A man 
who thought he had discovered coal in a thin ledge cropping up in a can- 
yon brought a specimen to him, and it was found to be jet of the finest 
kind, worth £20,000 a ton. This is a news item, remarks the Echo, 
which Whitby will hardly welcome with delight. 

The experiments with the Electric Light, in the court of the 
Palace Hotel, proved so successful that foiu- electric candles have been 
placed in position, and the court is now flooded with a most beautiful 
white light. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 616 Merchant Street, San Franrisco, California, 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1878. 




AUGUSTINE TO AUGUSTA. 

At the nmuerous receptions, balls and parties we have had here 
this month, I have observed that flowers are even in much greater favor 
than they were during the winter; the dresses are laterally covered with 
them. One of the prettiest dresses I saw last week was an ivoiy white 
satin with lilies-of- the- valley aud forget-me-nots ; the skirt in front had 
quite a flounce, ten inches deep, of falling lilies and forget-me-nots ; a 
branch or garland composed of these flowers came from the waist over the 
train at the back ; the bodice, which was round and low, was trimmed 
with them ; and the headdress was composed of lilies. Dresses orna- 
mented with various shades of roses are very much in fashion ; garlands 
of all kinds of Spring flowers, mixed together, are also considered new 
and good taste ; all ball dresses are made still very close-fitting. Watered 
silk, or Moir^ as we call it, is much seen as a great novelty for trinaming 
costumes. 

At the Grande Kermesse, or fair, held in the Orangerie at the Tuileries 
garden for the benefit of the poor Paris children, all the lady patronesses 
were very elegantly dressed. There was a costume Balsamo in mauve 
color that was very becoming ; the first skirt was round, in mauve satin ; 
the second was striped silk gauze mauve and white, draped scarf-like, the 
bodice was waistcoat palet6t shape with turned-back collar in mauve satin, 
and gauze mauve-colored fichu trimmed with lace that formed chemisette. 
Then I saw a charming dress: the skirt was plaited muslin covered with 
rich Valenciennes lace ; the polonaise was white damask silk, open at the 
breast, drawn up at the hips, and trimmed with plain silk fringes ; the 
bonnet was Italian straw with white feather. 

If we are to believe the weather prophets, we are to have rain for thirty 
days to come, with storms and hail between the 21st and 27th of this 
month. One celebrated prophet says July is to be the most rainy month 
of the Summer. Now, with such a prospect in view, it is really very 
courageous for any one to venture ordering any of the exquisite costumes 
that can be had so easily at the dressmaker's. However, I see very few 
really believe the prophets, and quantities of new costumes are to be seen. 
Cashmere is fashionable ; so is Nun's cloth mixed with silk, and Moir^. 
Tartans are very much liked, as also thin foulard, and a kind of plain 
linen cloth in stone colors ; and then cotton prints are fashionable, parti- 
cularly in check patterns. The trimmings are bands of embroidered linen 
or silk, and for the cotton print and linen dresses they are biais or side- 
cut bands of silk of the tint of the darkest color of the dress pattern. 
The prints, being of such common material, must have silk trimmings 
and good ribbons to give them style. It is quite a case of '* La sauce fait 
le poisson." 

Talking of sauce reminds me I promised to send you our way of mak- 
ing the sauce Robert, so much used here for veal, pork and mutton cutlets, 
and also for *' warmed up" poultry, etc. The sauce Robert is made as 



follows: Two or three onions are hashed oif cut up quite small and put 
into a sauce-pot or pan with a little butter; the mixture must be stirred 
over the fire until it takes a brownish color, then add a spoonful of flour, 
always stirring, pour in a glassful of beef liquor, a little salt and pepper, 
and let it [cook. Just before serving the sauce in a hot dish, add one 
spoonful of yinegar and a little mustard. If the meat or poultry is served 
in the sauce as a ragout, the dish is ornamented with sliced gherkins. 
-—Augustine in Truth. 

THE BANK OF ENGLAND RATE. 

For several generations the Bank of England rate has been re- 
garded with as much solicitude as the mariner watches the barometer. 
The machinery devifed to maintain the coin reserve of the United King- 
dom and keep afloat a reliable currency became an essential part of the 
British Empire, and on the wisdom with which it was handled hung the 
fate of the bankers and merchants. Artificial aud crude as was the sys- 
tem of controlling the movement of specie, it served its purpose well, and 
acted in the nature of a financial governor at a time when there was, 
perhaps, a necessity for some such guardian over the national finances. 

But Great Britain outgrew her great bank, and year by year its powers 
became less, until it ceased to control the finances of the country. The 
Joint Stock Banks of London grew to such colossal proportions that they 
absorbed the bulk of the banking business, and obtained full sway over 
the money market. For several years past the rate of discount of the 
Bank of England has not controled the quotation for loans on Lombard 
street. When its figures have been up to 5 per cent., money could be 
borrowed in unlimited quantities at 3 per cent. When a great emergency- 
arose, the Joint|Stock Banks have co-operated with the Bank of England, 
and the outflow of specie has been prevented, or an influx started, that 
restored confidence, but the great institution, though not powerless, has 
long since lost absolute sway. 

It has been determined, therefore, to abandon the custom of fixing a 
rate which could not be varied from in any instance. A mere nominal 
figure, or more properly, an average rate, is now established, and the 
Bank oflScials are at liberty to exceed this, or cut under it as in their 
judgment may be deemed best. In other words, the Bank of England 
now discounts paper at its market value, which is determined by the rate 
of money in the abstract, the character of the borrower, the nature of the 
collateral, and the purpose for which the funds are to be used. It is an 
innovation, but such an innovation as the conservative Britisher usually 
makes — one fully justified by long experience, and not too sweeping in its 
nature. It is in fact merely giving sanction to an accomplished fact, and 
in reality involves no disturbance of the existing order of things. 

The commerce and business of Great Britain has grown too mighty for 
any institution to control. A single hand may steer the ship of state, or 
a council handle the affairs of government, but a concentration of the 
entire financial interests of the empire under a single management is not 
to be dreamed of, for the human intellect is too feeble to grasp in its en- 
tirety the necessities and exigences of the combined industries of that 
great people. 

THE "JAMESTOWN." 

Commander Glass asks as an act of justice that his side of the ques- 
tion regarding the management of the Jamestovm be given. He explains 
that the Manila rope, about which so much fuss was made, had been taken 
from the rigging left at the Navy Yard by permission of the Command- 
ant, in order to save the exposure of the new gear for several months. 
When the ship finally came down to the city in March, 1876, this old 
rope was still on board, but not charged to the ship. As much of it as 
possible was used for lashings, making tenders, etc., and the remainder, 
several hundred pounds in weight, was sold by his order to the highest 
bidder, and the proceeds turned into what is called on board ship the 
"Slush Fund." The "Slush Fund" is kept by the Executive Officer, 
and is expended from time to time, on his order, for the purchase of smaU 
articles for ship's use — cap ribbons for boys, needles, thread, postage, etc. 
The " Slush Fund" is also used to avoid frequent petty demands for small 
amounts on the Treasury, which explains the case of the ship's cook, Scott, 
who succeeded aman discharged after a few day's service, and has been paid 
out of that fund. In order to reimburse the fund, the amount was added 
to Scott's warrant. The charge of cruelty, by washing the boys who are 
dirty with the gun deck hose, is frivolous. It may not be an agreeable 
way of taking a bath, but no ill effects ever did or could follow it. The 
same remarks apply to the charges about the clothing of the boys, which 
are equally foolish and unworthy of attention. Commander Glass also 
testifies that by his order a Board of Survey for provisions was estab- 
lished, consisting of the Surveyor and two other commissioned officers, 
whose duty it was to examine the provisions supplied the ship, inspect 
the boys' meals when served, and receive and investigate complaints as to 
ciuantity and quality of food. When reports were made of any deficiency 
in the rations issued, the necessary amoxmt was always issued after due 
investigation. He concludes by saying: "Had the above testimony 
been reported in full, I believe that much misconception as to the 
Jamestown and her condition would have been prevented, and possible 
injury to the School-ship avoided." 



THIKTY-NINE MILLIONS. 

The above figures represent as nearly as possible the xmited capitals 
of four of the greatest Insurance and Assurance Companies which now 
issue joint policies through their i^ent and attorney, W. Lane Booker, 
H. B. M. Consul, and their manager, Mr. Robert Dickson, The com- 
panies are respectively the Imperial Fire Insurance Company of London, 
the London Assurance Corporation, the Northern Assurance Company, of 
London, and the Queen Insurance Company, of Liverpool. Their world- 
wide fame is sufl&cient to convince the most superficial reader that a 
policy issued by these four companies, for which each and all are individu- 
ally and jointly responsible, must be a safe investment. The agent, Mr. 
Booker, is well and favorably known, both in private life and as the con- 
sular representative of England. Mr. Dickson, the able manager, held a 
similar position with Cross & Co. for many years. The four companies 
are to be congratulated on their having such reliable gentlemen to attend 
to theii interests. 



July 20, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



8 



LIES OF THE DAY. 

A tl« hfts no Ins*, snil eAnnol atAnd : bul it Ha* wincn. sntl o«n fly f^r at tl wUIp.— 
W\Km-HT<>!t. With I he «<l«i>t«l>ility ul «Iit>. niii hut iitftnr tut>U. I<ut ali« lotlio hfiridl« 
which lUstlivm all.— IrfiHii ltuiUT4tH.v»i. A lia bomlt othvrv; odo lt« mast be thaU'hod 
wiib knothvr. or tt vtM toon nlo thruiuh.— lAiito Thuioa^wk. 

"Ami thv Parftoii utAtlo It hi* tvit that week, «ntl ho mM Ijkewlso, 
Tl.«t Alio which ia half a lit' mitvfr tho bUokiMt nf limi; 
Thftt • li« that i* all * lifi may bn iitftt anil fouitht with oatriiiht, 
Bat • lia whloh ia wl a truth la a bartlvr luatUr to Sflht,— TkhkYson. 



It Is not tnie thi\i the Chinese Kmh;v>«y, jwr Cit;/ of Tokio, have been 
tcinU'rctl .1 pulilir ritvption by the WorlciiiK'mons' p.trty.— ^That tht-y 
intotul to r»«i>tni|»rtny Ki'uniey Kaat, in his snocinl cur, iw his hniioixMl 

{:iu*wtjt. " '-'I'hat Count Smith has In'on up at (iiiwon's School «tm!ying tho 
a^i;nl^^rt' of tlie exiK*cte'l ManihiriiH.-^^That CM. lU'O will wrap himself 
in the l»r.u:on flap, ami fao>rt them through the Chinese quarter.— ■ 
That Henry I*, l^oilire will sliow thorn how to make trade dollars, ami ex- 
(lov. Low will explain to them the mystery of how to purchase them cheap, 
in tlelianre of all opixwition.— That the electric lif^ht. in the court of tho 
Valaee, enables Uilly Shaw t»» see himself as others see him.^— "Tliat 
Hurtliek contemplates emij^ratin;: to Barcelona. ^^Th at the nianufac- 
tiirin;; husinejw iloes not aii^ree with him.-^That Johnny Skae and Col. 
Fair cimmibiat*.* nowadays over Sierra Nevada.— -That Sutro has decided 
t*» sand the Selby shot-tower up to keep company with his big bore.— — 
That the embarkation will be ilelayed until after Beecher comes and goes 
Away ayain.-^— That ('barley Kunkenatein is all ctiUar and mustache. 
^— That William Ward will ci>unsel hU English friends next time he 
take» them to a theater.^^That Mr. F left his chamber door un- 
locked at the I*alace liwt Tuesilay night. ^^ That be objected to the addi- 
tional occupant uixm his return.— ^That Tisdale thinks be is an Adonis, 
and that the Occidental Hotel belongs to him.—— •That the Forest Dra- 
matic and Social Club issued invitations, payable for at the door. 
That tho funds go raised was used for paj^ing the expenses of the enter- 
tainment. ^^That any of the (Club) would steal a benefit in such a mean 
way.— —That the broker who had his face slapped by a lady found his 
face wa-s not red but 6Vcf?i.— — That henceforth he will be more loatch- 
ful.— i^Tbat the Yosomite Cologne is doing a " Slaven" business — Leigh- 
tou says so. 

THE TURK UNDER BRITISH PROTECTION. 

The Turkish problem is solved at bust in a manner that must ulti" 
mately nrove highly S4itisfactor>" to the leading powers of Europe. The 
Anglo-l urkish Alliance, which the Berlin Conference sanctioned by not 
attacking, virtually places England in the position of a protector of 
Turkey in Asia ami a guardian over the European provinces of the Otto- 
man Empire. 

This fixes the southern boundaries of Russia, and places the people of 
those districts in a most favorable position. The decadence of Turkish 
power has left them a prey to the neighboring Christian empires, whose 
dominion would be scarcely les.s blighting than has been the sway of the 
Prophet. Neither Kussia, Austria nor Italy could regenerate them, or 
improve their condition in any respect. 

England is the only European power that can infuse life into these pro- 
vinces that link the east and thf west, that lie between the effete nations 
of Asia and the progressive peoples of Europe. The British have had 
experience in the management of all the races of mankind. Their sway 
has ever been a blessing to those over whom it has been extended. Com- 
merce and industry follow in the track of her armies. Frugal with her 
boldness, she inculcates the arts of peace among her colonists and depend- 
ants, and lends capital, skill and experience to build up their mutual in- 
terests. Her rule is not that of the robber and the ignorant tyrant, but 
pai-takes of that parental care which fosters and develops while it curbs 
and controls. 

The country which England baa taken imder her care embraces some 
060,000 square miles, and has a population of 17,000,000. Its natural re- 
sources, though not of the highest character, are not to be despised. Its 
caimcities have never been fairly tested. If the system of government 
had not been of a character to repress industry and stifle enterprise, the 
inadequate methods of transportation would seriously retard competition 
with Eui'opean countries. Of gTain, cotton, fine wool, silks, fruits, drugs 
and metals, the production has been large, but nothing like what it must 
become under favorable circumstances. , 

There will undoubtedly be. therefore, a great industrial revolution in 
these provinces, and the commerce of the world is likely to receive im- 
portant accessions. Though Great Britain will gain a gnod proportion of 
this, and find employment for a large amount of her idle capital, yet all 
Europe will be benefited to some extent. France, through her Mediter- 
ranean ports, is looking to the East for traffic. Italy is conveniently lo- 
cated to enjoy a portion of the trade. Austria and Germany may expect 
the new rail route to India through the Euphrates valley, that has now 
become a necessity to Great Britain, cost what it may, for substantial 
commercial advantages. It is not likely, then, that England will experi- 
ence any opposition, either at present or in the future, from any other 
Power than Kussia, which she expects and is fully able to meet. 

THE SONOMA DELEGATION. 

Captaia Charles V. Stuart, an old pioneer and former resident of 
San Francisco, is one of the delegates fi'om Sonoma county to the Consti- 
tutional Convention. Captain Stuart is a positive man, of strong opinions, 
based on a large experience, and what is of great importance to San 
Francisco, having practically no representation in the Convention (for 
most of the delegates scarcely know the boundaries of the city, or the 
direction of the streets), he has a thorough knowledge of the formathin, 
growth, and vested rights of this citj, having occupied a seat in one of 
the early Councils, and made investments in property in the southern 
part of the city, as also at Sonoma. San Francisco owes the interior a 
debt of gratitude for electin" the Non-Partisan delegates- at-large, and is 
under further obligations to bonuma county for sending an old San Fran- 
ciscan to represent that county. 

[We most thoroughly indorse every word of the above, extracted from 
the Alta California, of the 17th July. California is indeed fortunate be- 
yond any selection of its palmiest days.— Ed, S. F. News Letter.] 

Mary Audersou, it now appears, is the wife of Ensign Fremont, son 
of General Fremont, the Pathfinder. Some traits are hereditary, after all. 



COMMUNISTIC PANDEHa 

The behavior of our local dailies with regard to tho CnmmuniHta who 
arv pleased to ,-;dl them»elve« " Workiuk'nien," luwbeeu, with one notable 
oxix'ption. both di';:radin«^ to tho iligidtv of the Press and hurtful to tho 
comnnnntv. which tt is the duty of the Press t«i protect. 'I'he exception 
we have aibuled to U the AK'i, which, throughout the struggle now jiend- 
ing between lawless va;;abonds andhcuieHt men. ha« wt)rked for tho better 
cause with a fearless spirit and indi-fatigable energy which cannot fail to 
command tho admiration of all order-loving people. Tho Cafl, the Chron- 
icU; the HutUtiu, and, to a less vieiiuis extent, the Post, liavo boon exain- 
ides of the opposite. ITnder a shallow pretext of defending the People 
irom monoptdy und corruption, but really with tho intention of catching 
a few subscribers and mass-meeting advertisements, they have prostituted 
their columns to the ba-sest uses. Throats of murder and infrendiarism 
have been (irinted in tho form of " resolutions," ** speeches," "' addresses," 
and 80 on. No sentiment could bo so vile, or subsersive of law and order, 
that they would not eagerly snap it up and print it, lest a rival should be 
ahead with the news of the day. Tho Call declared that " Mr. Kearney" 
had made it the " official organ" of his party, and had denounced the 
C/ironicle. The Chronicle swm'o stoutly that tho "great agitator" had 
advised his mob to read it only, and had anathemized the Call. Tho 
JitilU-tiii straddled the fence, now putting one unscrupulous hoof to tho 
grouud, and now the other, Tho Post cackled for the "honest working- 
class" in its usual feeble strain; and betiveen them all the Communists 
have got so ]»uffed up with a sense of their own importance that there is 
no holding them. If these papers only knew how much harm they are 
doing themselves it is likely they would change their tactics. The time 
hius not yet come when a few dirty-faced pirates can run this community, 
and when people of sweeter appearance, speech and morals have onco 
more enforced their right to rule, it is altogether probable |that a new 
deal of daily papers will be in order. 

THE CRY IS "STUiL THEY COME." 
Oiu* climate is not only a remarkably healthy one for children, but 
specially jjrolific in their production, if one may judge by the number of 
twins whose appearance is weekly recorded. Only a few months ago a 
Mrs. Flynn wiis the medium of triplets being ushered into the world and 
an object of considerable sympathy, although we believe that two of the 
little girls have since died. Now Mrs. Schenck, of 40 Austin street, 
comes to the' front with a " trinity in the flesli " in the shape of three 
plump boys. The case has been noticed extensively by the daily sheets, 
but it occurs to us that in order to raise these little citizens successfully 
the News Letter will have to come to their rescue. It will require far 
more money than is at the command of the family to attend to the wants 
of the little ones, and this should be subscribed and put into safe hands, 
where it can be dispensed as it is needed, and the surplus kept for the 
benoSt of the three brothers. 

Our Thirteenth Industrial Exhibition promises to eclipse all former 
exhibitions of the Mechanics' Institute in richness, excellence and com- 
pleteness. The San Francisco Art Association undertakes the manage- 
ment of the Art Department this year. The display of foreign and local 
works will be superb. The machinery department will contain many in- 
teresting novelties. The garden will be exceptionally beautiful, favored 
by the bounteous Spring rains, and two instrumental concerts will be 
given by our now-celebrated orchestra, which so surprised the great Bos- 
ton leader. Applications for space should be sent at once either to Mr. 
Irving M. Scott, the President, or the Superintendent, Mr. J. H. Gil- 
more, as our leading houses are vieing with each other in the exhibits. 
The Mechanics' Fair will be opened on Tuesday, August 13th. 



Webster defines "thrumming"' as "playing coarsely on an instru- 
ment," and this is exactly what Sandy Austin did this week to an indi- 
vidual named Thrumm, who was instrumental in writing some dirty 
anonymous attacks upon a lady relative of his. Mr. Austin played so 
coarsely on Mr. Thrumm's physiognomy — in fact, thrummed so lustily 
on the defamatory instrument— that it jarred again, jangled and resounded 
horribly out of tune. Mr. Austiu adopted the proper method of teach- 
ing blackguards not to insult ladies, and it would be better if his exam- 
ple were generally followed in this community. A good thra.shing was 
never more deserved, and " Sandy's " chastisement will bear good fruits 
and point a moral even if it did not adorn Mr. Thrumm. 

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor. — The Rev. l5r. Scott, pastor, will preach morning and evening 
at the usual hours. Public very cordially invited. At the beginning of 
morning service, 11 o'clock, children may be presented for baptism. 
Sunday School and Bible Classes, 9^ A.M. Prayer and praise service, 0^ P.M. 

For Mexico.— The steamship Newbern sailed yesterday with a well 
assorted cargo, valued at S54,000. 

For Honolulu.— She schooner Undine sailed on the 19th inat., with 
general cargo, valued at §18,330. 



WAKELEE'S AUREOLINE 

Produces the Beautiful Golden Hair so much Admired. 

BTTPERIOR TO TME IMPOJRTBJD AltTXCLJE 

— BY REASON OF IPS — 

FRESHNESS^ AND CABE USED IN ITS PRODXTCTION. 

PRIC£, I-AROE BOTTtES, gS, 

Manufactured by JBT. P. WA.KEI.EE <C CO., J>riiggist»j corner- 
Montgomery and Bush streets, S, F. [July 20. 

OFFICE OF THE HIBEKNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

Northeast coruer Montgomery and Post streets, San Fran- 
cisco, July 17th, 1S78.— Reduction of Interest.— With a view to investuig itg 
surplus money, the Hihemia Savings and Loan Society wiU, until further notice, 
make loans of five thousand (:?5,000) dollars and upwards at tihe rate of seven (O.per 
cant, per annum ; and will loan sams less than five thousand (&5,000) dollars at eight 



(a) percent, per amiuin. 



July 20. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



.July 20, 1878. 



ABOUT AUSTRALIA. 

editor Ne'ws Letter: Since nay arrival in Saa Francisco there have 
been put to me a guud many times whole strings of questions about Aus- 
tralia in general, ami that portion of it called Victoria in particular. 
Among the anomalous mass I noticed, nearly always, a few such as the 
following to occur: " Is it a good country to go to? "Would a man with 
a little means better himself? Ai-e there many people there? Is Mel- 
bourne like this city ? Are the mines rich ? " To answer ah such ques- 
tions in a satisfactory manner, in the course of a conversation, was out of 
the question; but to the important ones, as I thought them, I made such 
replies as I now send you. And I do so partly- because they may have 
some interest for resident Australians, and partly because they may 
henceforth save me from having to repeat them any longer. To the 
queries, " Is it a good country to go to? "and, "Would a raan with a 
little means better himself there?" I reply: The country is well enough, 
but people have to toil for a living there as in other countries, and if you 
are making a living in California stay where you are, and if you are not 
doing so in this State, try some other. Very few Americans, even in 
connection with good business houses in New York or Boston, have made 
an independence. Fanning is not- better there than here, and land dearer, 
while the ordinary occupations of life are, I conclude from observation, 
about the same. Taking into account the cost of living in the two coun- 
tries, the wages for all kinds of laboi", skilled or not, are no better tlian 
here, if even so good — certainly not at present. Here is the latest relia- 
ble information as to the state of labor in Melbourne. This was in May 
last, and it must be remembered that May is only the first month of the 
Australian Winter, the seasons there being the opposite of here: 

A large meeting of the unemployed was held on Maj* 19th on a vacant piece of 
ground on Collins street. The meeting included a larg^e number of men of all 
classes and trades out of employment, many of them being apparently in distress. 
Resolutions were passed in favor of Government proceeding inmiediatcly with all 
necessary public works, and a deputation aft-envards waited on Mr. Burry at the 
Treasury, when, in reply to their representations, he promised to ascertain if the 
alleged distress really existed, and if so, to find employment for the men on the pub- 
lic works. He ascribed the number of unemployed to the unwise tactics adopted by 
the capitalists and moncj'ed men who had been defeated at the hustings. He said 
that all the authorized public works were being carried out, but promised some tem- 
porary measure of relief, which be believed would prevent the present pressure on 
the labor market. He would undertake certain works without the authority of Par- 
liament, trustinif to obtain its sanction afterwards. 

"Are there many people there?" As to Victoria, the smallest by far 
of the Australian Colonies in the matter of territory, the population is 
over 8G;i,370 at present— far less than it ought to be, if the right sort 
could be got, such as domestic servants, farm laborers, dairy maids, rough 
carpenters for bush work and the like. Foreignei-s, including Chinese, 
are not numerous. The Chinese seem of quite a different class from those 
in this city. Merchandise, hawking, peddling, gardening, fishing and 
mining are their pursuits. There is hardly one in domestic service; neither 
do they invade the ordinary occupations of the people — no washermen there. 

California and Victoria both started as settled States about the same 
period. San Francisco and Melbourne are identical in age from their 
start to become large cities. As to population, Melbourne contains within 
a radius five miles from the Post Office, in round numbers, 275,000, e.\;clu- 
sive of the floating jjopulation. There is but a small number of Chinese 
or other foreigners. It lies on comparatively level ground, and differs 
from this city in nearly every particular, save the streets, which are wider 
in Melbourne, formed at right angles to each other, and are splendidly 
macadamized. The city proper occupies only one square mile. In all 
directions adjoining it are large and beautiful parks and public gardens, 
some of the parks comprising hundreds of acres. Several of the smaller 
ones are exquisitely laid out, planted -with shade trees and flowering 
shrubs, and most carefully tended. Starting from these parks and 
gardens are the City of Collingwood and eight large towns, to say noth- 
ing of large and populous villages. In Victoria a town means not less than 
20,000 people. Folks live in their own houses. The hotels are a mere 
nothing, in comparison to those here. If one were to attempt a strict 
comparison between the two, the best he could say would probably be 
that, taken as a city, San Francisco is far more architectural, the houses 
more regularly built, and it shows everywhere a more cheerful and a mi>re 

Salatial appearance. There is no pretence of architectural uniformity in 
lelbourne in any sense—not one fine range of buildings. There is noth- 
ing to combine for effect. That must be sought iu individual works. 
Yet, the public buildings. Post Office, Town Hall, Treasury, Government 
offices, merchants' stores — especially those of the importers of soft goods — 
and banks, are far beyond anything to be met with here. The tone of 
the city is heavy, sombre, built, as it is, mostly of dark blue basalt. No 
city in the world is supplied more abundantly with gas and w^ater. There 
is no underground drainage, and consequently no mephitic sewer gas in 
the houses ; the system of scavaging and i-emoval of fecal matter and 
house refuse, carried on under the city corporation, is nearly if not quite 
perfect. Well, partly no doubt owing to what I have just mentioned, 
it is pretty well agreed that Melbourtie is the second moat healthy city in 
the known world— Yokohama being the first. I must leave mining and 
agriculture for another time, for I fear I have already trespassed ton much 
ou your valuable space. John J. Eleasdale, D.D. 

AN ARAB AND HIS MAHG. 
An Arab cMef who lived near Bussorahhad a favorite breed of horses. 
He lost one of his mares, and could not for a long time discover whether 
she was stolen or had strayed. Some time after, a young man of a differ- 
ent tribe, who had long wished to marry his daughter, but had always 
been rejected by the sheik, obtained the lady's consent, and eloped with 
her. The sheik and his followers pursued, but the lover and his mistress, 
mounted on one horse, made a wonderful march, and escaped. The old 
chief swore that the fellow was either mounted on the Devil or the fa- 
vorite mare he had lost. After his return he found the latter to be the 
case, that the lover was the thief of his mare as well as his daughter, and 
that he stole the one to carry off the other. The chief was quite gratified 
to think that he had not been beaten by a mare of any other breed, and 
was easily reconciled to the young man, a^ the mare was an object about 
which he was more solicitous than his daughter. — Sporting Times, London. 

Human nature is pretty much the same across the water. The French 
papers that do not receive free passes pronounce the big show a miserable 
one-horse affair. 



Banks. 



NEVADA BANK OF S AN FB ANCISCO, 

8AJ>r fhaxcisco, ca.Tj. 

Paid TTp Capital :$10,000,000, Gold. 

SurpluB(TJ. S. Bonds) $2,500,000, Gold. 

DIRECTORS: 

liouis McLaiie President. | J. C. Flood Vice-President. 

John W. Mackay, W. S. O'Brien. James G. Fair. 

Cashier H. W. Glenny. 

Agent at "Virg-inia, Xevada Georg-e A. King. 

Agents at NewTork(e2WaUst.)..C, T. Christensen, C. "W. Church. 

Issues Commercial and Travelers' Creilits, available in any part of the world. 

Makes Transfers of Money by Telefjraph and Cable, and Draws Exchange at cus- 
tomary usances. This Biuik has special fauilities for dc-aling in Bullion. 

EXCHANGE on the Principal Cities throughout the United States, Europe, Japan, 
China and the East Indies, the Australian Colonies and Kew Zealand, and on Hon- 
olulu, Hawaii. 

New York Dankers Tm! B.\nk of New York, N. B. A. 

London Bankers " ' Messrs. Smitu, Paynk & Smiths. 

I TuE Union Bamk of London. 

[May 25.] ^ 

THE BANS OF CALIFOBNIA, SAN FKANCT5C0. 

Capital $5,000,000. 

WM. AI.YORD President. 

TBOSIAS BROIVN, Casbier | B. BIVBBAX, Jr., AssU Cashier 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfomia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Jai>an, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locanio, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Iucorporatefl by Royal Charter.— Capital paid op, 91, 800,- 
000, with power to increase to SIO.OOO.OOO. South&ist corner Calif or uia and San- 
some streets. HeadOfiice— 5 East India Avenue, London. Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoria and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Companj' ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America- London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Au.stralia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand — Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

WM. H. TILLINGHAST, FRED'K TOWNSEND, 

May 18. Managers. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FHANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, B. C. tt'ool- 
worth ; Vice-President, i). Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors;— E.. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, D. D. Colton, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Corresposdests- London : Baring Bros. & Co.; Cliartcred Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and Cliina. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer&Co. NewYork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago ; First National Bank. This Bank is jire- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the prmcipa! 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, OhiLa and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FBANCISCO BANK (LIMITED). 

Capital, $5,00«,000, of wbich $3,000,000 is fully paid np as 
present capital. Beserve Fund, §480,000, Sau Francisco Office. 424 Califor- 
nia street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Assistant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN; Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. London 
Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank ; New York, Drexcl, 
Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact 
all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business in Loudon and San Francisco, 
and between said cities and all parts of the world. March 30. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK (LIMITED). 
yd O^ California street, San Fraueisco.— Xjoudoii Office, 8 

■41: ."^ .-w Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co. , 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Cullcotions. buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. " " 

P. N. LILIENTHAL, Cashier. 



FRED. F. LOW, ) «.„«„„« 
IGN. STEINUART, / Managers. 



Oct 4. 



HASTINGS LAW DEPATtTMENT OF THE XTNIVERSITT OF CAL. 

All persons who «lesire to be entered as students of the Col- 
lege, will pleajse addrtiss the Dean at once at his office, Court Block, San Fran- 
cisco. For further information, see the address of the founder, 

S. C. HASTINGS, Dean. 
C. F. D. HASTINGS, Registrar. Office, Court Block. S. F. June 22. 

A GRADUATE OF A UNIVEKSITY, 

Who holds a State Teachcr^s Certificate, wishes to give pri- 
vate lessons in Greek, Latin, or Common School subjects. 
Juno 29. Address "J. R. B.," 1018 Washington street. 

REMOVAL. 

Edward S. Spear & Co., Auctioneers, will remove July 1st 
to No. 729 Market street, between Third and Fourth, opposite Dupont. Reg- 
ular Sale Days— Wednesdays and Saturdays. July C. 



July 20, 1878, 



CALTFOUNIA ADVERTISER. 



THE THREE CX>FFINa 

Threo ct>fTii)8 awnit their final rcixiso 

In the HUcit'iit cIuisL<i-s' k<^'v|unt;i 
And n Urief lioiir hi'Dt-e tho li*U will close 

Un the ft>riiiH beueiith them HloepinK'. 
The tint \& ii Kiii^ who hath rnletl the land 

As hia f;ahci-8 did befoi-e hiiu ; 
A jeweled swptrt' is placed in his hand 

'I'll bhow how well ho bure him. 
The next is a Chief from the battle-field, 

^\'olm^K■d, and bn>nzed, and hoary; 
By hitt ttide are ix-stini,' his tiword and shield, 

The emblems of martial glory. 
The third is a lowly Son of Sony, 

With no state jwmp attended ; 
Tho lay of his Ivre hath sounded hmg 

Thriiuyh tlie isles— but now it is ended. 
Hai*k! what is that at the postern gate, 

I^ike the roar of distant water? 
'Tis the foe with boundinj; hopes elate 

Keturued to the work of 8lau;:;hter! 
"Ho, King, awake! re-ascend thy throne, 

And round thee summon thy sa^'es!" 
From the pale mute lips there is answer none, 

While tlie storm without still rages. 
"Ho, Chief, awake! to the tents repair — 

In the van lead on thy legions!" 
They listen, but all is silent there — 

Still and hushed as the Polar regions. 
From the Poet's coffin a sigh is heard, 

And the lyre at his bare feet laying 
Starts into life, like the trill of a bird 

Whose melody knows no staj'ing. 
*Tia an old, old theme, but it fires the blood 

Of the troops, with none to lead 'em, 
And they fight as the valiant always should 

For the love of their faith and freedom! 
Wlien the sun goes down in a radiant glow, 

With molten clouds attendant, 
The three nailed coffins are now laid low — 

The Cross is in the ascendant ! 

—London Sunday Times. 

NEW MOVE AMONG MANUFACTURERS. 

Adam Smith remarked that whenever a lot of manufacturers assem- 
bled together, it was pretty certain they were concocting a plan to get 
their hands into somebody else's pockets. This was at a time when free 
trade doctrines had not taken so firm a hold on the British mind, and 
when manufacturers were always scheming to get assistance from the 
government and obtain jirotection against competition. The estimate of 
this wise man would not have been hightened had he lived in our own 
day on this side of the Atlantic. Manufacturers long besieged Congress 
with indifferent success, but in the midst of our great Civil War, when 
other men were thinking of saving the nation, they were piling up bar- 
riers against foreign competition. A tariff of the most outrageous char- 
acter was thus fastened on the country, and we have had a fair opportu- 
nity to fully test the virtue of protection. Forty per cent, on cotton 
goods, 35 per cent, on flax goods, 33 per cent, on manufactures of hemp 
and jute, 45 per cent, on iron and steel, 3u per cent, on leather, 30 per 
cent, on paper, 50 per cent, on woolen goods, 58 per cent, on silk goods, 
99 per cent, on salt, 50 per cent, on paints and colors, 52 per cent, on 
glass, imposed for a period of fifteen years, ought certainly to have ac- 
complished something toward establishing these industries on a firm foot- 
ing. On the contrary, a htnger period of nursing is asked, and we find, at 
the ])resent time, the average value of the manufacturing establishments 
in the United States about 33 per cent, of their coat, thousands of them 
idle, and laborers compelled to accept wages even below the prices paid 
in the Old World. 

Unable to make much of a showing on the theory of protecting home 
industry, our manufacturers are now sedulously inculcating doctrines 
equally unsound. They now declare that the inventive genius of the age 
has been stimulated too much, and production is ahead of consumption, 
and the world has reached that stage in which Avork cannot be found for 
its inhabitants. A host of plausible writers are now engaged in dissemi- 
nating this doctrine on the other side of the Rocky Mountains, and an 
agent is now here in this city with a view to ingrafting it on the platform 
of the Workingraen's Party. Exactly what is to be obtained by the 
adoption of these ideas is not clear, unless it is intended as the initial step 
toward a repeal of the ]jatent laws, so as to discourage inventions, and 
ultimately to a government proliibition against building any more factor- 
ies, machine-shops or mills. There is, beyond question, some deep design, 
and manufacturers expect to reap some substantial advantage at the ex- 
pense of the rest of the country. 

The history of the printing press clearly exposes the fallacy of this de- 
lusion regarding -the danger to labor from improved machinery. When 
the first steam press was erected for the London Tim-cs, the employees 
threatened to destroy it. At that time, there were but few journals in 
the world, and but a few hundred persons employed in the business. Im- 
provement after improvement has been made, till a single printing press 
of to-day does the work of a thousand men, but there are now thousands 
employed in the various departments of journalism where only dozens 
were when the work was done by hand. 

Statistics of the progress of the manufacture of textile fabrics in the 
United Kingdom show that, in 1850, there were 3:30,924 persons employed 
in making cotton, linen, jute, hemp, silk and woolen goods. In 1874, 
there were 1,004,566 — an increase of 203 per cent. In 1850, there were in 
operation 25,755,423 spindles and 304,438 looms. Twenty-four years 
later, the former had increased to 51,077,300, or 98^ per cent,, and the 
latter to 667,658, or 113 per cent. It will thus be seen that the number 
of persons employed in the factories has increased as rapidly as the addi- 
tion to the machinery, the total augmentation of looms and spindles being 
211A per cent. The additional labor required to handle the increased 
product after it leaves the factory, the hands required to produce the raw 



material, the trnnHTK^rtafcion and the mnnufnctitrer of the machinery it* 
Bidf, hnvo incroiMtod in a greater ratio. With »uch fact* as these before ue 
it is idle to talk of even the possibility of tho world sufFering from tho 
introduction of machinery, no matter how jierfect it may be. 



Savings and Loan. 



THE GKRUAK SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCTETY. 

Deat8CheN|>i»ruii(l I^clhbiiuk, 7io52B ('iillforiilnHireet,Naii 
Friincisco. Ofkicers : rresidciit, L, CioTTK!. IkiAiiit ok DnuxruHs.- frt'd. 
Koeilinj,', Chas. Kohler, Dan. Moycr, Edw. Kruso, Oeur^'O H. KgRcrs, N. Van liprgcii, 
H. L. Simon, Claus Sprockols. Socrotary, GEO. LETrE; Attornev, JOHN K. 
JARUOK. filfty la. 

MASONIC SAVINGS AND LOAN BANK, 

Nn. 6 Post Ntreet, Mnsonlc Tcinplc, Snn Frauclsco, Cnl.— 
Moneys rucctved ou Term and Ordinary Deposits; dividotids paid acnii-ainiually; 
loans made on approved security. (March 2.] H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK —GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 8300,00'} 

Offii'crM: I*rcMi<lciit, Joliii I'arrotl; Vicc-Prcsltlciit, Jerome 
Lii'coln ; Secrutary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans ma4c on 
Real EsUvte and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Fra ncisco. ^ Oct. 14. 

FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bnsh street, above Kearny, O. Slalie, Director. I^oans 

made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



411 

interest. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Tlie Gerniasi Savings aii«1 Loan Sociely.— For the linlf year 
ending: June 30tli, 1S7S, the Board of Directors of tho German Savings and 
Loun Society has declared a dividend or. Term Deposits at the rate of eight (8) per 
cent, per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of six and two-thirds (Hj) per 
cent, per annum, free from Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the 16th day of 
July, 187S. By order. [July 29,] GEORGE LETTE. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 532 California street, corner 
Webb.— For the half year emliiijf with June 30, 1873, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of ei}?ht (8) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and six and two- 
thirds (63) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of Federal Tax, payable on 
' " Tuesday, July W, 1S7S. [June 29.J LOVELL WHITE. Cashier. 



and after Tuesday, 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Saving's and liOan Society, C19 Clay street.— At a meeting- of 
the ^ard of Directors, held this day, a dividend, free of Federal Tax, of seven 
and one-half (7^) per cent, per annum, was declared on all deposits, for the term end- 
ing June 29th, 187S, payable on and after July 15th, 1878. 
July 13. CYRUS W. CARMANY. Cashier. 

THE AVERILL MIXED PAINT 

Ismannfactnrcil from strictly pure AVIiite I^ead, Zinc, and 
Pure Linseed Oil, to which is added Water GlaSs, which chemically unites the 
iBgredients and holds them in solution, so they cannot separate. As a house paint 
it has no equal, producin^j a brilliant g-Iossy finish, impervious to the weather, and 

Will I^ast Twice as liong- 
as any other paint made. It is of pure white, and any Shade or Color desired, mixed 
ready for the brush, so that any one can apply it. 

Our wagon and lu'chinery paints, from the more common colors to the finest ver- 
milion, arc specially desirable. 

Our fire-proof roof, barn and hridg'e paint, nianufactured from oxide of iron, is the 
best and cheapest paint for the purpose that can be produced. 

Put up in J, J-, 1 and 5 gallon cans, and in barrels, sold by the g^iUon. Send for 
sample card of colors and price list. Address, 

CAI^IFOKNIA PAINT COMPANY, 
July 13. 329 MARKET STREET, San Francisco. 



A. J. Plate. 



H. A. Plate. W. B. Cotrel. 

A. J. PLATE & CO., 

Importers aud Bealers iu Guns, Rifles, Pistols, Sporting- 
Material, 
Masonic, I. C. O. F. and Ililltary Goods of Every Description. 
—sole agents Foa the — 
Celebrated Xtemington Ai^nis. 
510 Sacramento street, between Montgomery and Sansome streets, S. P. 
^^ New Work Made to Order. July 13. 

SCHWEPPE'S SODA WATEE! 
With HENNESSY BRANDY, forms a perfect combuiation. 
SCHWEPPES TONIC WATiR! 
The most pure and perfect appetizer known. 
SCHWEPPE^S POTASS WATEE ! A sure cure for dyspepsia. 
SCarWEPPE'S MALVERW S^LTZEE! 
Bottled at the celebrated Malvern Springs, Worcestershire ; highly recommended 
by all Physicians. I. SCHWEPPE * CO., 

Berucrs autl Ox:for4l streets, I^oudon. 
Regular Consignments received by £!ENJ. F- KILEY, 

July 13. 318 Front st., up stairs. 

EEMOVAL. 

Tlie Office of the Golden Chariot STiningr Company, ]>iana 
Gold and Silver Mining Company, Golden Gate Con. Hydraulic Minmg Com- 
pany, Minnictta Belle Silver Mining Company, and Hazard Gravel Mining Company, 
has removed from Room 22, Merchants' Exchange, to 

Booms 13 and 14, 318 Pine Street. 
July 13. J. T. McGEOGHEGAN, Secretary. 

DE. G'TOOLE'S OFFICES 

Are moved from 906 MarJtet street to California Savings 
Bank Building, corner Market, Powell and Eddy streets. Entrance on Eddy 
street. July 13- 



H, 



BEMOVAI. 
W. JPatrick, Teacher of the Piano, has moved his res- 

, idence to 113 PAGE STREET, San Francisco. July 13. 



E. H. LLOYD, 
Attomey-at-Law, Boom 13, Nevada Block. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETtER AND 



July 20, 1878. 



Theatrical, Etc. 



California Theater. — Very rarely has it been our good fortune to 
enjoy a dramatic performance which so thoroughly deserved the excellent 
reputation it has <^»btained as was the case in Diplotmu-y, produced last 
Monday eveninf? at this house. In these times of crude composition, pla- 
giarism and prolific adaptation, it is indeed refreshing to_ find a comedy 
drama which, both in motive and action, is novel and interesting, and 
which at the same time is as far removed from the ranks of the modern 
French school as it were possible, considering its origin. For, its results 
are strancre when we view its authorship. Sardou \vrote Dora with but 
one essentially French character in it; that is to say, the plot was handled 
according to a Frenchman's ideas and tastes, but the very element which 
of late has seemed to govern the French dramatists in their work — the 
pandering to vicious sentiment and the excess of doithlc entendre — is con- 
spicuously absent. In adapting this play to the English- speaking stage, 
Messrs. Saville and Bolton Rowe have been enabled to retain the chief 
elements o£ success, and not— as is usually the case for decency's sake — 
cut out the pith, leaving the unsatisfactory husk for the benefit of their 
countrymen. In consummating their excellent work, they have necessa- 
rily made some radical changes in the objects of the story. They have re- 
placed the purely local allusions to Versailles and the Spanish conspiracy, 
by the broader motive of the Eastern question; they have reduced five 
acts to four.; they have made brothel's out of characters that are friends in 
the original, and have rendered more conspicuous the part of the 
"Countess Zicka," at the expense, perhaps, of the original heroine 
" Dora." Add to this, that they have placed before the public a literary 
work of exceptional merit, and we have to acknowledge that Dipfomari/ 
is the par excellence of a comedy uf intrigue. It is a play of situation 
rather than of character, although each individual is portrayed with a 
clearly defined touch and brilliant exactitude; and although when the cur- 
tain falls upon the last act we have gained considerable information as to 
their destiny, we are very little nearer an insight into their nature than 
at the close of the first act. The story of Diplomacy has been so freely dis- 
cussed in the columns of the press that comment is needless; and we pass 
at once to the actors who are called upon to delineate the principal char- 
acters. Miss Jeff"r'es Lewis as the "Countess Zicka" flashed like a me- 
teor of artistic perfect! )ii throughout the four acts, and in a measure con- 
trolled the interest of her audience. She gave to this i-o/c a degree of wo- 
manly vindictiveuess that was absolutely startling, while in the tenderer 
emotions— notably in her heart-rending appeal to "Julian" for forgiveness 
— she showed a culture and genuine interest we have rarely seen equaled. 
In the speech in which she describes her past life — its trials and temjtta- 
tious — the subtle suggestion of thought and feeling, the delicate portrayal 
of intense agony and despair, controlled by a lasting hate, was simply su- 
perb ; while the manifest uneasiness in the last act, when it gradually 
dawns upon her that she is discovered, was rendered with consummate 
skill and Jinesse. A praiseworthy feature in this talented lady's 
acting is the abandon with which she identifies hei-self with the char- 
acter she portrays. She leaves a feeling with her audience that, 
perfect as she may be as "Zicka," she would have controlled the same 
interest and obtained the same success, had she been cast for the more in- 
definite part of "Dora." As the latter we regret the unsatisfactory 
efforts of Miss Maud Granger to cope with the exigencies of the part; 
she either did not appreciate or was unable to portray the beauties of 
this character. In the third act she seemed to arouse herself somewhat 
from the inanimate style she seems to affect, but as a whole her perform- 
ance was colorless and unsympathetic. Among the male characters of 
the play Mr. Warde, as " Henry Beauclerc," takes the palm for subtle 
intelligence and careful delineation of his part. He played the gentle- 
manly and aristocratic diplomatist with a sangfroid positively refreshing, 
at the same time preserving the integrity of his position as elder brother 
intact. Mr. Montague was suffering the first two evenings from a severe 
cold. We therefore defer a criticism of his " Captain Julian Beauclerc " 
until next week. Mr. Barton Hill, on Wednesday evening, appeared 
in bis stead, although some minor points of business in the subor- 
dinate action of the play were lacking in his performance, still where 
real action was necessary, as in the "grand trio" in the second act, or 
during the exciting action of the third act, the natural instinct of the 
actor rose equal to the occasion and infused a magnetism which Mr. Mon- 
tague was prevented from imparting to his audience. Mr. Carroll, 
as " Count Orloff," played his part in a manly, vigorous style- 
just a little stiff, but withal very true to life. In the "trio" 
scene, at the end of the second act, these gentlemen acquitted themselves 
creditably, playing their parts for all they were worth. As "Baron 
Stein," Mr. J. W. Shannon made quite a hit, achieving a suc- 
cess only second to that of Miss Lewis. This is a part that Mackay 
would have reveled in — an unctuous, plausible, tricky old diplomatist, 
whose very catlike tread is pregnant with deception and conspiracy. The 
perfect self-command this gentleman exercises oi er himself is simply 
wonderful, and deserves the bighe^ commendation, especially in the 
scene between himself and " Zicka," after the wedding, in which he in- 
cites her to rob " Beauclerc's " dispatch-box. Mr. Long, as "Algie Fair- 
fax," rendered some valuable assistance in a light part, as did also Miss 
Emily Mestayer, as the " Marquise." The mise en scene was good, espe- 
cially the second and third acts, although the oppointments in the fii-st 
act might be improved upon. The delays between acts were long' and 
rendered doubly annoying by the wretched performances of the orchestra 
and the ceaseless cries of the vendors of candies, etc., who are now per- 
mitted to annoy the audiences at this house. This is one of the old-time 
abuses, fast dying out in Europe and the East, but only lately foisted 
upon San Francisco theater-goers, Viploni'icy is 1 k ly to have a long 
run, as its success is assured. 

The farfiwell testimonial to Mr. T. W. Keene, at the California 
Theater, to-morrow evening, promises to be a most brilliant affair. It 
will positively be this popular and deserving actor's last appearance prior 
to his departure East. Whilst we cannot but regret that at this time 
many of the faces we have grown to love in the old California Theater 
company are leaving us, yet we trust always to have them with us in 
spirit by hearing of their successes elsewhere, and Mr. Keene we are 
sure will gi^e us that pleasure, even if he d<ies not return. The bill for 
Sunday night is the Dukt's Motto, in which Mr. Keene plays " Henri de 
Lagardere." He should and will have a crowded house. 



■Peter's Fence have fallen off four-fifths, as cimipared with last year. 



Bush Street Theater. — Tony Pastor's second programme has not been 
so good as that of last week, being to a certain extent a repetition of the 
old successes of the company, and where any novelty has been pro<luced 
it is decidedly of a weaker character. The kickers — the Daly Brothers, 
Emerson and Clark — are very good, the altitude to which they reach be- 
ing almost incredible. One of the party takes a table, jdaces upon it a 
chair, then stands upon the chair himself, holding the hat out at arm's 
length, the hat being kicked from his grasp by one of his confreres. 
Their performance is more of a gjinuastic exhibition than a song-and- 
dance performance. Mr. Rogers and Mis^Vickers also deserve the high- 
est prai.se, their efforts being artistic, bright and clever. The best work, 
however, the gentleman has given us was his imitation of a noted actor as 
" Fagin," the Jew in Oliver Twist. This was very realistic and true to 
nature. Mr. Barry is very amusing, bit gives us nothing new; the same 
complaint being applicable to Watson and Ellis. The Kernel Brothers 
treated us to a new act, and Bryant and Hoey were really excellent in 
their musical specialties. The company and their entertainment is really 
good; and if they would only infuse a little novelty into their pn>- 
grammes, and leave Tony Pastor and his motley songs out, they would 
be highly acceptable and very entertaining. 

BeddTOln's Academy of Music— The Octoroon has proved a sufficient 
attraction to be continued throughout the week, with fair success, moderate 
houses having been the rule, with the exception of last Monday, when 
the management issued a general invitation to the officers of the British 
man-of-war Turt/uoise, and their appearance, in full dress, not only gave a 
brilliant effect to the — usually neglected — Mezzarine boxes, but drew a 
proportionately larger audience. The piece in every respect remains the 
same, except that use and custom has made it run somewhat more evenly. 
Miss Hose Wood still affects the picturesque but very out oi place cos- 
tume, which has marred her performance from the commencement. Mr. 
Mackay's " Pete" grows upon one; it is really excellent and very well 
sustained, and does great credit to this meritorious and pains-taking 
ai-tist. Miss Sylvester continues to take liberties with all the convention- 
alities of the part of " Dora Sunnyside," and barely atones for her eccen- 
tricities by her piquant and refreshing naivete. Next week we are pro- 
mised Fnnn Singapore to Suez, a modem play of the " Overland Koute" 
type, with a strong cast, and some excellent scenery. 

Theatrical Notes. —It gives us much pleasure to note the appoint- 
ment of Mr. Martin Joyce to fill the vacancy in the box-office at the 
Bush-street Theater, vice Mr. Kirby, who has gone East in the employ of 
Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Joyce, during his long term of office at the Califor- 
nia Theater, by his integrity and general deportment, made himself hosts 
of friends, who will doubtless greatly rejoice at his return to his former 
line of business.-^— Mr. Kennedy, having leased the Opera House from 
Mrs. Emerson, opens it upon August the 3d with — what are promised to 
be— some extra attractions.-^— Mr. Edward Burt also opens the Grand 
Opera House, late in August. We are informed that Beecher will give 
his lectures in the latter building. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE. 

Thirteenth Industrial Exhibition, San Francisco, Cal., 187S. 

Tbe Alaiia^ers linve tlie honor to announce to tfae Public 
that the THIRTEENTH GRAND EXHIBITION UF SCIKNfjK, ART AND IN- 
DUSTRY, given uuder the auapices of ibe Mechanics' Institute, will upcn at the Pa- 
vilion, on Market, Eighth and Mission streets, on Tuesday, Ang'USt 13th. 

Great and unusual attractions will be presented to visitors, Aliuing, Agjieultural 
and other Machinery will be in motion. Pacific Coast Manufactures,' Minerals and 
Products of the- Soil will be fully represented, beside many new and interesting nov- 
elties never before exhibited on this Coast. 

Tl^e Art Department will be under the supervision of the San Francisco Art 
Association, a guarantee for excellence and completeness. Local .\rt will be speuially 
represented, as also works of noted foreign artists, selected from the private galleries 
of this city, 

Tbe Jlorticultnral Oarileu, so popular heretofore, will be made still more 
attractive this year ly the addition of many new features. 

The Music. --Each afternoon and evening a first-class Instrumental Concert will 
be triven by the best soloists and ftCcompUshed musicians of this city, with a daily 
change of programme of the best and moh-t popular music. 

No expense or pains will he spared by the Mauiigement thot will add to the com- 
fort or convenience of visitors. 

Applications for space or information can be obtainRd from the Secretan', at the 
office, 27 Post street. IRVING M. SCOTT, President. 

J. H. Culver, Secretary. [July 20.] J. H. GILMORE, Superintendent. 

CALIFOKNIA THEATER. 

Barton A. I^awlor, Alnung-ers: Barton Ilill, Actiiiiu: manager. 
Instant Success of MR. H. J. MONTAGUE and his New York Companv, in 
Sardou's latest success. DIPLOMACY, which will be presented MONDAY EVENING, 
July 22d. ever>' evening during the week and at Saturday Matinee, with Scenerj', 
Costumes and Appointments entirelv new, and a cast iucluding: the Misses MAUDE 
GRANGER. JEFFREVS LEWIS, EMILY MESTAYER, HATTIE ROCHE, JENNIE 
ARNOT, Messrs. H. J. MONTAGUE. F. E. WARDE, J. W. CARROLL, J. \V. SHAN- 
NON, J. N. LONG and JOHN WILSON. Seats at the Box Olfice six days in 
advance. July 20. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Barton A liHwIor, ]flfanagers; Barton Hill, Acting 91 ana^er. 
Sunday Evening, July 2tyt, Farewell Testinii^inia! to T. W. KEKNE. I'ositively 
his LAST APPEARANCE j.rior to his departure for the East. THE DUKE'S MOTTO, 
wiith a powerful cast. Box Sheet now open. July 20. 

BUSH STREET THEATER. 
/"Ihnrles E. Iiocke, Proprietor.— Bvery eveninjs^, Inclailinx 

\y Sunday, Wednesday and Saturday Matinees. Second Week. Entire Change 
of Programme. Every Act a Specialty. Every Specialty a Feature. TONY PASTOR 
in Entire New Budget of Songs. An entire new melange of Song, Fun and Comedy, 
the whi)Ie forming the most elaborate of Vaudeville Programmes. Special attention 
called to the i>opular Ladies' SATURDAY MATINEE. Box Office open continuously 
for sale of Reserved Scats, from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Carriages ordered for 10:30 p.m. 

BALDWIN'S THEATER. 

Thomas Ittagrnire, Manager; Freil. I..yster, Acting: Kfanagr^*!*; 
G. R. Chipmau, Treasurer. Last night but one of the great hit of the seaion 
THE OCTOJtOON! 

Old Time Plantation Scenes ! Old Time Plantation Songs ! All the Star Company ! 
LAST OCTOROON MATINEE, SATURDAY, at 2 o'clock r.M. Sunday Evening, July 
2 1st- LAST PERFORMANCE OF THE OCTOROON ! 
Monday— FROM SINGAPORE T O SUEZ. July 20. 

MADAME JULIA MELVILLE SNYDER, 
ft.~t ^ ^Insou street, between Bush anil Siitter.—Tocal Mnsic 
\^ JL%i for Opera, Concert or Parlor. Piano and Elocution. Dramatic Elocution 
and A'oice Culture Specialties. Terms made known at residence. May 25. 



July 20, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



SIONAL SERVICE METEOROLOQICAT. REPORT. WEEK 
SNDINQ JULY 18. 1878. SAN f'WSaiaOO, OAI.. 





IliyhfMl ami 


LotCftit 


9af*otrt0f(>r. 




Pri. 12. 


Sat. 13. 

so 00 


Sun. 14 

a).i)« 


Mon 15. 


Tue. 16 


Wed 17 

2»,'.« 


ThrlS 


SO.Ol 

iu.uo 


•.ii.ss 


2V.9J 


20.11.". 
'20.00 



73 



MaxtmutH nud HtHiiniitn Thrrntotnvtrr* 

&7 I M I M I 52 1 &i I 

Mean Daily Htnniditjf. 

7i! I 7U I 71 I 8:2 I 81 t 

rr^aUtnif Wind, 
S\V. I s\v. I SW. I w. I W. I 

Wlnd—Mil>-it Travvifd. 
213 I 3iS I -iSt I yyi I 21!) \ 

State of n'father. 
Clear. I Clt-ftr. ! Clear. | Frtir. | Fuir. [ 
Jtatnfall in TwcHty-four Hours, 

I I I I .01 1 



02 

55 

W. 

275 
Fair. 



Total R ft in Tinring Srasnn hrrfinnin;/ tTaly 1, 1S7S... .01 inches. 



SANITARY NOTES. 

Ninety-seven deatba occurred this week, as compared with 76 last 
ami !C» for the currespondin',' week last year. Of these 14 were Cliiaese, 
4 accidental, 1 homicide and 1 suicide, and 28 were under 1 year of age, 
and an equal number between 20 ami 40 years. The mortality (22) in 
the Eleventh Ward continnos far above that of any other ward, the 
Tenth having 9, the next hi^rhest; zymotic deaths were, 8 cholera infan- 
tum, 3 diarrhea, 3 typhoid fever, 1 diphtheria, 2 whooping-cough. There 
were 4 deaths from cancer and 8 from inflammation of the bowels; 4 
pneumojua, 1 bronchitis and 13 consumption. Scarlatina prevails in the 
neighborhood of Washerwoman's bay, and whooping-cough is prevalent 
over the entire city. 

The long rowa of fashionable equipages, and the throng of persons 
hastily wending their way aleng Market street la'^t Monday, announced 
tt> the fashionable world that the great exhibition of the year was open. 
It required great patience to work one's way through the mass of people, 
all eager to get in, but once inside the " Pavilion," the spectator felt 
that Slessrs. Kennedy & Durr had indeed, as they claimed, the largest 
and most complete stock of dry goods ever shown in San Francisco, and 
the largest and best arranged store in the city. The Pavilion extends 
from 8.'t4 to 830 Market street, the finest location in the city. The firm 
has on exhibition the latest styles and patterns in silks, shawls, dress 
giiods and fancy goods of all kinds, embracing, of course, the latest novel- 
ties from the emporiums of the world as fast as they appear. The cim- 
stantly arriving and departing crowds attest the success of Kennedy & 
Durr's great enterprise. 

Tourists attracted by the gorgeous and tasteful display in the win- 
dows uf the Diamond Palace should not he content with an examination 
of the beautiful and artistic jewels reposing on their many-colored silken 
beds and revolving in the reflection of countless mirrors. By crossing the 
liubicou of a marble step, they will find themselves in a perfect palace of 
Aladdin, surrounded by cases of the rarest jewels, watches, and articles of 
vertu. What will particularly attract the tourist is the Colonel's collec- 
tion of jewelry made from g<)Id-bearing quartz and every known mineral 
from the different mines of Nevada, California and Arizona. Such a col- 
lection cannot be found in any other house in the world, and should be 
seen by every visitor to the city of San Francisco. 



Excursion Tickets to Monterey.— To-day the Southern Pacific 
Kailruad Company will commence the sale of round-trip excursion tickets 
to Monterey at greatly reduced rates. These tickets will be sold on Sat- 
urdays only, for the 8:30 A. M. and 3:30 p. m. trains. The run of the lat- 
ter train will be extended to Salinas on Saturdays to accommodate this 
travel ; the Monterey and Salinas Valley Railroad making close connec- 
tion witli this train for Monterey. Tickets good for return on the follow- 
ing Monday, arriving in San Francisco at 10 a. 3I. and 3:40 P. M. 



Our Hanunam Baths still continue to enjoy an ever-increasing 
patronage from residents of the city; while to the wearied traveler and 
the overland tourist they are a blessing beyond all description. Tlie 
steam_ baths are a pleasant adjunct to the Hot Air Rooms, while every 
conceivable shower that was ever invented is at the disposition of the 
bather. The Turkish bath is indeed the luxury of the age, and the man 
is yet unborn who can supersede it with a better or more sanitary 
invention. 

■WingDrillsof the FirstRegiment—TheFirstRegiraent, N. G. C. has 
engaged Horticultural Hall, where wing drills will take place on Monday 
evenings, July 22d and August 19th {Right Wing), under the instruction 
of Colonel Oscar Woodhams ; and on July 29th and August 26th (Left 
Wing), instructed by Lieut. -Colonel David Wilder. The regimental band 
will be in attendance. Dress parade and other evolutions will be gone 
through, making it interesting. 

1853— 1878.— Mr. and Mrs. F. Dnhring will have asocial gathering 
of their friends, on the occasion of their silver wedding, at Sonoma, July 
27th, 1878, at 8 P. M. Dancing at 9 o'clock. No presents will be received. 

There wiU be a cricket match to-day at the Recreation Grounds, 
between the first eleven and an eif^hteen of the Occident Cricket Club. 
Their first match. 

J, M. Litchfield continues to turn out the fine custom made clothing 
he is so noted Un: The fit is, as ever, superior, the finidh par excellence, 
and the place 415 Montgomery street. 

Krug Champagne. — Private Cuvee, in quarts and pints; Shield — 
Krug — in quarts and pints ; Premiere Qualite, in quarts and pints. For 
sale by Hellman Bros. & Co., corner Front and Jackson. 



The old firm of E. K. Howtw & Co., importeni and manufacturern of 
wtMidvii iiud willow ware, are intructucing a great many novidtien in goods 
thiM seiison. The house hiui the agency of the Pacific Coniage ( 'ompany, 
and also deals largely in broonm, umtches, etc. Tlieir olticei* and aiilen- 
roi»mH are, as evfr, at 118-122 Front street. Country dealers will do well 
t<i inspect thtir .splendid stock. 



A rare opportunity for purchasing gas chandeliers, fancy pUnnbing 
ROodB, etc., is now otfered at McNally & Hawkins' ohl established firm. 
No. G07 Market street, Grand Hotel building. Their eli-gant stock of 
gixids can be obtained at greatly reduced prices. C-all ami see them, and 
you will surely purchiwe. Plumbing, gas and steam fitting promptly at- 
teniled to ut lowest rates. 



PRESIDENTS, SECRETABIES AND MAN'iGING DIRECTORS OF 
MINING COUFANIiS. 

Plcnse propikrcyoiir reporlH for the "Pnclllc CoiMt Aniiiinl 
.Miriiii',' ItL'vicw iiml Stuck LciltCcr," the ncuussary lilaiika for wliicli have been 
left lit tlic UiffurLiiit Miiiiii;,^ Odiccs. 

11 i^ ruajiuftluUy au(,'L,'cstt;d that the Ilei>ort sliould embrace: A brief history of 
the iniiie and a dcaeriptioii of the company's works, niacliuicry, etc. ; a syiiopsia of 
the Sniioriiitemlont's unnual report ; the Treasurer's exhibit, etc. 

Stockholders and the stock-dealing )iublie gonurally dcyiru a statement of the 
amount of money received and disbursed, and fur what purposes. They alao desire 
to know what work has been done, and what is in jirogress. Give the people the 
facts in relation to the mines. Itemembcr that in addition to the immense edition 
that will be printed for home circulation, thousands will go into the hands of cap- 
itjilists in the Eastern, Western and Southern States, and thousands into Europe 
and Atjia. 

Let every mine on the Soast be represented in the Directory department, and let 
every mine possesshig merit and fair prospects be well written up in the Editorial 
department. 

If there is a Secretary in the city that has not received blanks for his Reports, let 
him send his name at once to R. S. LAWRENCK, Editor, Room 75, Rusa House. 
Corrcspo lid e lice. 

Gentlemen in the interior to whom we have addressed Circulars will please send in 
their Reports at the earliest practicable moment. Send us all the facts in relation to 
the District and each particular mine. The influence of the publication will bo 
world-wide. 

The work will be published by the old and reliable house of Francis & Valentino, 
517 Clay street. July 20. 

Xo LET, 
Queen's Theater, Dunedin, Nevr Zealand. 

Tills elegraiit and commodioas Theater, sltnated lu the 
main thoroughfare in the heart of the larirest city in New Zealand, can be ob- 
tained for long or short dates on very moderate tenns. From its central position, it 
always commands large and fashionable audiences to legitimate entertainments and 
first-class talent. The interior has recently been sumptuously furnished, Dress Circle 
and Stalls having partitioned seats in Utrecht Velvet and Leather, and other appoint- 
ments of the most approved kind. The stage is well furnished with Scenic Proper- 
ties, and the necessary requirements for Opera, Concert or Drama. 

The building has been pronounced the best ventilated and most comfortable Theater 
in the Australasias. Seating accommodation, 1,500. All rates, water and gas are 
included in the hiring. 

Population of Dunedin and suburbs, about 26,000. 

Correspondence and communications invited from friends, responsible managers, 
etc. For terms and dates apply to GEORGE R. WEST, 

Theatrical and Concert Agent, Music Warehouse, Dunedin, N. Z., Sole Agent, 

Where all professional correspondence can be addressed, and advice or information 
obtained. July 20. 

DAY SILVER IHINING COMPANY. 

Notice la hereby g-iveu that at a meeting- of the Board of 
Trustees of the above named Company, held on the eleventh day of July, A.D. 
1S78, the Secretary was directed to notify holders of stock sold at delinquent sale 
July 9th, 1878, and bought in by the Company, that the same could be redeemed 
upon payment of assessment and charges if presented within ten (10) days from pas- 
sage of the order. J. W. PEW, Secretary. 
July 20. OflBce— No. 310 Pine street, Room 15, San Francisco, Cal. 

THE NEW gymnasium" 

Athletic Cnrriculiim, Xo. liti'Z Sutter street. T. DC. C. A. 
Building, San Francisco. Prof. ALFRED PEHRIER, Teacher of Athletics; 
Mons. A. VAUTHIER, Assistant Teacher of Athletics; Prof. HARRY MAYNARD, 
Teacher of Boxing. The Best Appointed Gymnasium on the Pacific Coast. Open 
Daily (Sundays excepted) from 10 o'clock a.m. to 5:30 P.M., and from 7:30 to 10 r.M. 
Terms— PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Adults, S2 per month. Boys and Misses under 
10 years of age, $1 per mouth. Lessons in Boxing and Fencing, Extm. June 22. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Oflieeof the Enreha Consolidated niiiilug: Company, Xevada 
Block, Rojm No. 37, San Francisco, July 15, 1878.— At a meeting of the 
Board of Directors of the above-named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 33) 
of Three Dollars per share was declared, payable on Saturday, July 20th, 1878. 
Transfer Books clostd until 22d inst. 

July 2Q. W. W. TRAYLOR. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French Savlng;s and I^oan Society. 411 Bnsh street.— The 
French Savings and Loan Society has declared a Dividend of seven and one- 
half (7i) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, for the half-year ending June 30, 
1878, payable on and after July i7th, 1878. By order. 
July 20. GUSTAVE MAHE, Director. 



S' 



avory & Moore, 143, New Bond street, London, prepare 



The Best Food for Infants. Supplied to the Royal Families of England 
and Russia, To be had of Chemists, etc., everywhere. 
The Best Food for Infants. Most digestible. Contains the highest 
amount of nourishment in the most convenient form. 

Malted on I^iebijar's Principle. Sweet and wholesome in itself. En- 
tirely free from Beet-root Sugar, the bane of Condensed Milk and Swiss Foods. 
The Best Food for Infants. More closely resembles healthy Mothers' 
Milk than any other kind of Food. 
A Thoroug:hly Cookeil Food. Always ready for use. Saving Mothers 
./\ and Nurses much time and trouble. 

The Best Food for Infants. Contains all the elements necessary for the 
Growth, Health and Vigor of the Child. 
Savory *& Moore, 143, New Bond street, London, and sold by all Chemists. 
[July 20.] 

OEEICES OE THE AEROPLANE NAVIGATION CO.. 

Jan. 4. No. 607 to 615 Merchant street. San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LHffTER AND 



July 20, 1878. 



'The World," the Flesh, and the Devil 

[By a Truthful Penman.] 



The returns of the Registrar-General for Ireland show some satis- 
factory results during the past twelve months. The population has 
slightly increased, and now stands at 5,^40,000. There is a continuous 
immigration — slight, perhaps, but steady; and this is accompanied by a 
declining emigration. The country, therefore, can hardly be goinfr alto- 
gether to the bad under Saxon domination. The marriages were five to 
every thousand of the mean population. The deaths were in a ratio of 
seventeen per thousand- — a slight increase on the previous year. Zj^motic 
diseases were somewhat more fatal than in former years.— An officer of 
the Chinese navy, Lin-Tai-Tsan, has been appointed to the flag-ship of 
the Admiral Sxiperintendent of the Naval Reserves now attached to the 
Particular Service Squadron at Portland, in order that he may have an 
opportunity of witnessing the steam tactics and evolutions to be performed 
by this large fleet. ' — The Japanese corvette Seikci has ' ailed from Lisbon 
for England. ^^By the opening up of Siberia, we le:an from Moscow 
that some of the leading merchants there have f'^rmid themselves into a 
company for trading direct with Siberia. Two vessels will be, during the 
course of the month, fitted out by them, and will convey from the Yene- 
sei to the Neva, sugar, oil, kerosine, candles, and other pn^ducts of 
Kussia, returning in the autumn with corn, isinglass, precious stones and 
minerals. The company will also send a steamer for permanent river 
service on the Yenesei. Intelligence from Siberia likewise states that the 
expedition of the Taissian Geographical Society, \mder the command of 
Baron Aminoff, for exploring the river basins of'the Obi and Yenesei, 
has arrived at Yenessisk.^^The funeral of the late King of Hanover 
took place in the little Protestant Chapel in the Kue Chauehat. From 
the Arc de Triomphe, near which the late King residt^d, all along the 
Champs Elysi^es and the Boulevards a dense crowd was gatliered to view 
the procession as it went by. In the chapdk ardentc which was formed 
in the Courtyard of the royal mansion, the Crown Prince and the Prince 
of Wales received the mourners. Tjie Prince of V^'ales did his best to 
persuade the Queen and the Princesses not to follow the King's remains 
to the Church, but without avail ; they adhered persistently to their de- 
termination. The funeral car was of imposing magnificence: the lofty 
carriage with silver wheels was drawn by horses of which the plumed 
heads and the feet were all that appeared from out the caparison of black 
velvet sown with silver tears ; the body of the car was likewise silver, 
while shields bearing the initials of the deceased Monarch embroidered in 
gold adorned it. The rich canopy was almost hidden under a gigantic 
crown of natural flowers, and had four immense black plumes at the cor- 
ners. The pall was borne by four high dignitaries of his late Majesty's 
court. In front of the house walked the servants of the house, their 
scarlet liveries crossed by mourning scarves ; by the side of it were a 
dozen men bearing large crowns, and iive-and- twenty with batons sur- 
mounted by bouquets. Two of his Majesty's carriages, covered with 
black and silver hangings, and fourteen funeral coaches followed. The 
Crown Prince of Hanover and the Prince of Wales were chief mourners. 
An entire division, under the command of General Lefevre, was present 
to pay musical honors to the late King, as also detachments of the Garde- 
Republicain-k-Cheval, a battery of artillery, etc., the whole under the 
supreme command of General Aymard, Governor of Paris. The Corps 
Diplomatique was very fully represented, haviag at its head Prince Orloif, 
in the full uniform of a general, and wearing the Grand Cordon of the 
Legion of Honor. The President was represented by his son, M. Patrick 
de MacMahon.~^The Alexandria correspondent of the Loudon Times 
furnishes bome interesting statistics of the recent passage of the Suez 
Canal by the fleet of sailing vessels and steamers which conveyed the In- 
dian contingent from Bombay to Malta. There were twenty-eight vessels 
in all, sixteen sailing ships and twelve steamers. The first arrived at 
Suez from Bombay on May 16th, and the last, with the exception of the 
Indian dhow, left Port Said for Malta on May 29th. Eight tugs were 
employed in towing the sailing vessels through the Canal. The average 
time in the Canal of the steamers was only thirty hours, and of the sail- 
ing vessels forty- four, averages seldom beaten in the history of the Canal. 
Over half a million gallons water were supplied to the fleet at Suez, be- 
tween 3,000 and 4,000 tons of coal at Port Said, and something under 
£2,000 was paid for fresh provisions, yet only thirteen days were spent in 
Egyptian watere. Admiral Willoughby deserves great praise for the per- 
fect success of his ai-rangements, which were much facilitated by the cor- 
dial co-operation of the Canal Company.— ^Mr. Johannes Eckart, of 
Munich, claims to have discovered a method of keeping fish perfectly 
fresh for many daj's after capture, his plan of procedui-e consisting in im- 
pregnating them by means of hyli-aulic pressure with a weak solution of 
salicylic acid, packing them in casks or cases, and pouring gelatine over 
them. The latter serves to prevent their becoming stiflf and dry. Pre- 
pared and packed in the above manner, they may, it is said, remain ten 
to fifteen days, and even longer, en rouL^, without detriment to their flavor 
or appearance ; and Mr. Roosen, of Hamburg, who is turning this new 
system of preservation to practical account, has received the most satis- 
factory reports respecting his consignments of fresh and salt water fish to 
distant countries. Trout caught near Munich, and treated according to 
Mr. Eckax-t's plan, arrived, it appears, at Bergen, in Norway, and in New 
York, in a perfectly fresh state ; and sea fish dispatched from llingkjobing 
in Denmark, to Dresden, Leipsic, and other inland Germau towns, have 
found such favor as to encourage several Consum-vereine to give orders 
for weekly deliveries. Sample consignments have also been made to Eng- 
land, and Mr. Roosen proposes to arrange for regidarly supplying the 
London market. As one of Mr. Eckart's patent impregnating machines, 
large enough to hold 400 lbs. of fish, will prepare some 8,000 lbs. per diem, 
a c(m8iderable amount of piscine produce can thus be quickly preserved 
for dispatch to any destination ; and since ice is altogether dispensed with, 
and no necessity exists for sending the fish by fast trains, the cost of 
transport is, of course, greatly reduced. American papers say that 
Edison, the inventor, has perfected a fog horn that can be heard ten 
miles ; but when it comes to an invention for getting his hired girl up in 
the morning, he smiles sadly and falls to musing on the infinite.-^— It is 
not generally known that R.A. is equal to £300 per annum, that being 
the sum which the Royal Academy pays annually to the f(trty Acade- 
micians.— ^The Shah paid a visit to the office of the Paris Fifjaro while 
it was being printed. So greatly fascinated was he b; the machine that 
they could hardly restrain him from taking the papers otf the cylindei-s. 



Insurance. 



FIRE, I.IFE: A9ri> MARINE. 

INSURANCE AGENCY HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

No. 314 Cal.fornia Street, San Francisco- 
Capital Kepresented $11,860,000. 



Girard Ins. Co Philadulphia, Pa. | People's Ing. Co Newark, N. J. 



Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. 

New Orleans Ins. Ass'n .... .New Orleans 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Texas 

Tr;ide Ins. Co Camden, N. J. 

[March 30.] 



St. Paul F. & M. Ine. Co. . .lit. Paul, Minn. 

Home Ins. Co Columbus, Ohio 

La Caisse Generale Ins. Co . . Pai-is, France. 



AGGREGATE ASSETS, S38,7S9,G65 ! 

Imperial Pire Insurance Company Of liOndozt. 

London Assurttnce Corporation Of London. 

Northern Assurance Company Of London. 

Queen Insurance Company Of Liverpool. 

A. Joint Folicy Issued hy the Fmir Comjj'anies. 

W. liAXE BOOKER A^eut ana Attorney. 

ROBERT BICKSOX Manii§:er. 

July 13. 317 California St., San Francisco- 

HOME MUTUAL INSUBANCE COMPANY OF CALIFOEKIA. 

Principal Office, 406 California Street, San Francisco. 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1877, $M5,291 ; Liabilities, &S,{)52 ; Suqilus for Policy 
iloldirs, ^tatJ.y:".D. J. F, Hou^'litou, Presidtut ; Geo. H. Howard, Viee-President : 
Charles K. St. r , Secretary. K. H. 31AUILL. H. H. BIOELOW, General Agents. 

iJ RECTORS.— San Franci eo— Geo. H. Howard, John H. Redinytou, J. F. Houyhton 
R. li. uray, Robert Wan,, John Ourrey, L. L. Baker, W, f. Whittier, C. 0. Burr, E. 
M. lluot, W. H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood, George S. Mann, Citus 
Wilson, W. T. Ganatt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling, A. Block, A. K. P. Harmon, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Uodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch— V. D. Moody, Chauncy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert's. Far- 
relly, Joseph B. Marltn, W. B. Hardy, T. B. Simpson. San Die^'o— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento — Mark Hopkins, D. W. Larl, Julius Wetzlar, James Carolau. San Jose — 
T. Ellard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Pfister, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John Auzerais, John Balbach. Stockton— H. H. Hewlett, Chas. Beldins', 
J. D. Peters, A. W. Simpsnn, H. M. Fanning:. Maiysville— D. E. Knight. Grass 
Valley— \Vm. Watt, T. W. Sigournej'. Portland, Oregon— W. S. Ladd, C. H. Lewis, 
P. Wassermau, B. Goldsmith, 1). Muclcay. Virginia City, Kevada— John Gillig, L'^aac 
L. Reijua. Martli 17. 

. FIKE AND MAEINE INSUBANCE.— UKION 1I<S. CO. OF S. F. 

The California liloyclN.— -Establisbetl in ISG1.»- UTos. 416 an<I 
41>> Califiirnia street. Cash capital ¥7.50,000 in Gold. Assets exceed §1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid SocUrity ! 1 DiRECTOIlS. 
—San Fraxcisco— J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Moses 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, Antoine liorel, Charles Kohlcr, Joseph Seller 
I. La\vrence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandenstein, Charles Eaum, James Motfitt. Ed- 
ward Cadwalader, Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, \V. M. Hoag, Nicholas Lu- 
lling, John Parrott, L. A. Booth, J. Baum, M. D- Sweeney, Bartlett Dne, Gustave 
Touchard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Ducommun, Wm. Scholle, 
John Conly, I. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, J. 0. Eldridge, A. B.Phipp&, Jas. M. Goewey. 
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Charles D. Haven-, Secretary'. Geo. T. EonEX, Siu-vcyor. July 23. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 

FIUE AND MARINE. 

^^asb Assets, 9450,000.— Principal Office, 218 and 230 San- 

V> some street, San Francisco. Office ris : — A. J. Bkyakt, President; Richard 
IVKRS, Vice-President ; Chaklks H. Cosiiiko, Secretary ; H. H. Watson, Marhie 
Sur\'eyor. Boaiid ok Directors : — Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. O'SuUivan, 
A- Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corhert, George O. 
McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Buckley, 
P. J. White, E. M. Root, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld, Daniel 
Cailaghan. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Scale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 16. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSUBANCE CO., OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted tlie business of JAte Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to overFoL'RTEEN Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Slutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed hy the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has comii'ied mththe new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 2-J.] 323 Montgomery str eet. 

THE SWISS MASINE INSURANCE COMPilNIES COMBINED. 

Snftzerland. of Zarieli, Capital 5,000,000 francs: Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basic, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies arc liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
tained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, our Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HENRY BALZER & CO. , Agents, 213 Sansome St., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 
/"lapital $5,000,000.— Agrents: Balfonr, Onthrie A: Co., DTo. 

\j 230 California street, San Francisco. No. 18. 

THE THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE CO. (Limited.) 

E. N. HOOPER. Agent. 
June. 1. 1 Office : 303 California Street. 



F 



MORRIS SPEYEE, 
ire and Slarine Iu>inrance Ag:ent, 307 California street. 

Dwelling, 507 Post street. January 1, 1S7S. Jan. 12. 

1878-79. 
PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES. FOR CITY AND COUNTY PURPOSES. 

Notice is hereby {s^lven that a certifiefl copy of the Personal 
Property Assessment Itoll of this City and County fur the fiscal year 1878-70, 
has this day been placed in my hands for collection. Taxes thereon are now due 
and payable. Taxes remainini^ unpaid after JIUNDAY, the FIFTH DAY OF 
AUGUST ensiling, wUI then be delinquent, and five per cent, will be added thereto. 
WSI. JIITCHELL, Tax Collector City and Comity of S F. 
July 8, 1873. July 13. 



July 20, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



9 



HOW HE "WON HIS STARa 

[by u r k k k . ] 
For the fonl in tlie valo where the river flowed 
The t'oKmel n-ule hftnl, iinil swore am ho rode ; 
His iiiituth was t*et un<l hi8 fnco ha<l |>:ili'd, 
]''i>r he knew thnt hist tniojient hnd fiillen and fnileiL 

"Who's thiit, dismounted nnd ttphished with innd, 
Prippiii;,' with water luid stained with blouil? 
Irt it the Captain? It can't be true! 
l>o my eyes deceive nie ? Pray (!od they dol" 
A.s the hnrryin^ troojwr came full in sigut 
His face jfrew paler, and well it mi;^dit, 
Kor he never had dreamed, or thought, or guessed, 
That the man of all tithers he loved the best, 
Who had followed him often thronijh flood and fray, 
WouM leave the fieUl on n battle day. 

"Haiti" and the Captain's feet were stayed. 

"Where are you going?" the Colonel said. 
Quick came the answer, read)' and short: 

"We're whipped, and I go to the rear to report-." 
No look of suspicion or doubt to complaiu, 

" No wasting of moments, no pause to explain ; 
But notiui; the Cohmel's blank dismay 
With a quizzical glance, he strode away. 

The Colonel rode on to the river below 

Where his troopers had blundered and charged the foe ; 

Over the river to mn the day, 

Up to the bank where tlie foemen lay, 

But the bank was steep, and tlie rifle shot 

In their very faces c*me thick and hot. 

In vain the shout and the saber's gleam ; 

Their steeds slipped back in the rushing stream. 

Back they rode to the other side ; 

Back throu'^h the river with life-blood dyed ; 

But one, when he saw how still and brave 

His wounded comrades sank in the wave. 

Had faced about, through a leaden rain, 

And plunged in the whirling flood again. 
"I'll save who I can ; it won't last long;'* 

Steadily swam he, high and strong, 

Thirteen times through the leaden rain 

Over the river, and back again. 

The Colonel down from his saddle leant. 

His stern face changed and his brow unbent 

As he questioned, " Who and where is he?" 
"It's yonr brother. Captain, Company D. 

His horse is dead, but the way is short ; 

They've sent him on to the rear, to report." 

Two summers of fight and foray had flown. 

And the old-time ties had stronger gi-own ; 

But never a word of the tight ia the tide: 

Never a word on either side 

Till that darksome day when the foe drew near, 

And the Colonels' voice rang steady and clear: 
"To the crest of the hill, ere they flank our line! 

\Vlio'll ride for the crest, brave comrades mine ?" 

Fii-st to the front was the Captain, then ; 

He rode fur the crest with but sixty men. 

He gained the bight and the foemen reeled. 

But be fell that day on a bloody field. 

Prone from the saddle he forward fell. 

The staunch young trooper who rode so well ; 

But took, half rising from where he lay. 

His parting shot at the coats of gray. 

One question he asked through the pain he felt, 

When at his bedside his brother knelt, 

With the old boy look — and it smote like a sword — 
"Did yon think I ran from the fight at the ford?" 

Never a bullet could do him harm 
When they brought him home to the dear old farm ; 
In the toil-worn gai-b of the trooper lay 
Only the dead but kindly clay. 
To the soil that he cherislied his coffi-n fell. 
Draped in the colors he loved so well ; 
Ou bis brawny shoulders a Captain's bars. 
But over his bosom he wore the stars. 
San Francisco, July 12th, 1S78. 



COURRXEIR DE LA MODE FARISIEinTE. 
Never in the history of France, not even under Louis XIV., the re- 
nown of whose fetes still dwells among us, nor under Louis XV., nor yet 
during either the First or Second Empires, when luxuriousness seemed to 
have reached its greatest possible extension — never, I say, was there such 
a whirl of gaiety as there is in Paris at present. Never has the gay 
world danced so much, dressed so brilliantly, been more splendidly enter- 
tained, seen more that is rare, singular and astonishing. Long will this 
year of the Exhibition be green in their memory. Everywhere and every- 
where every day, there are fetes, ceremonies, grand dinners, enormous 
balls, concerts, races, and every other imaginable and unimaginable spe- 
cies of entertainment. M. and Mme. Bardoux have just given a bal- 
spectacle-concert, to which the originality of its idea gave quite a special 
character. They conceived the happy thought of representing for the 
amusement of their guests the Ballet des Fleurs, taken from fia,nzeau's 
Opera "Leslndes Galantes," which was represented in 1739 befox-e Louis 
XV., and which was on this occasion placed on the stage with all the cos- 
tumes of the period, and danced by the Corps de Ballet of the Opera. A 
long galley had been constructed on purpose, with the stage at one end ; 
thewalls were hung with red velvet and the magnificent tapestries of the 
national Garde Meuble. There were seats for 800 ladies, whose toilettes, 
all light in color, all decolletees, and whose coiffures adorned with flow- 
ers, offered a sight as charming as it was uncommon. In the reserve seats 
in the front row were the Countess of Flanders and Mme. la Marechale 



de McMahon. The former, as fair as over, was the guc-sl of the evening; 
t(he wore a dress of tunpiiue blue, covered with old lace, and in her beaux 
cheveaux bhuuls a simple bamJeau of diamoiuls. Mine, la Marechale 
whoso toilettes are always quiet, wore a dreHS gris de lin, adorned with 
drooping bunches of sweet pen, ami she had, also, in her hair the «ame 
flowers fastened in with strands of diamonds. Mme. Bardoux, the wife 
of the Minister, a very pretty woman and very fiislinguef, was in white 
satin with wreaths of rose blossoms without foliage. First of all, the 
most celebrated artists of the principal Parisian theatres sang some of 
their best pieces, then the Corps de Ballet danced a Pavane. This is a 
dance o( the sixteenth century, which was much in vogue under the Va- 
h)is, and afterwards under Louis XIII., who himself composed a charm- 
ing air to which the Court Pavanes were afterwards danced. Some con- 
certed pieces, executed by members of the CNmservatoire, followed. Then 
came the great aud anxiously-waited for attraction of the evening— the 
Ballet des Fleurs. It was exquisitely danced, aud excited universal en- 
thusiasm. Let us see what the danseuses, who represent the flowers, are 
like. They wear short skirts with enormous paniers and long corsages, 
making their waists as fi4e as a wasp's ; low in front only, and covered 
with wreaths of flowers. All had their hair powdered. They formed a 
bouquet from which came forward the stars of the opera, Mines. Laure 
Fonta, Sangalli, Sanlaville, and Biot. The Forget-me-not in a sky-blue 
dress ; the Pink in white taffetas, covered with wreaths of strijied pinks ; 
the Honeysuckle, in silk damask, color, a pale vert d' eau ; the Helio- 
trope in a dress of silver-grey with bunches of the lilac flower ; the Ver- 
bena with bright rosege bouquets on a pale silk skirt ; and the Rose, the 
queen of flowers, represented by Laure Fonta, in a dress of gold brocade 
covered with wreaths of roses of the richest hues, and with her lovely 
locks powdered. with diamond stars. They executed to admiration the 
old steps, the studied poses, and the quaint dances of other days, and so 
different to ours, and the si^ectators were irresistibly carried some two 
ceturies into the past. 

^Vhat can I say after this about the other Ministerial receptions? At 
the Ministere des Finances, the dancing was great and the supper was 
gay. There was no stint of diamonds; of white dresses ; of silk dresses 
of two shades of pink, adorned with bouquets of the red rose dn roi ; of 
hair hanging down the back bound with bows of ribbon. 

Now for a word or two on the Grand Prix, although last Sunday's race 
is a little far back in the world. Your papers have already given full 
details of the sport. The weather was sufficiently fine to allow the new 
dresses, mostly short, which had been ordered for the occasion, to be dis- 
played in all their glory. The stands and the paddocks looked like fields 
of corn and corn flowers, there were such numbers of ecru dresses, such 
quantities of pale blue and red ribbons. The Queen of Spain wore a ba- 
tiste dress of white and lilac stripes. Mme. la Marechale was in pale 
grey, very simple. The Shah had on a plain cashmere tunic embroidered 
with gold and not a single jewel! Surely a Prince who has brought with 
him four millions of francs to spend on any trifles which may take his 
fancy ought to sport his diamonds for behoof of the Parisian badauds on 
the day of the Grand Prix. The Duke of Aosta, that handsome cavalier 
with the black mustache, is talking to the lovely Countess of Flanders, 
who is most tastefully dressed and wears a charming bonnet, which came 
from the atelier of our old friends Mmes. Henry and Schneider. 

Parisian inconstancy is often amusing. The Prince of Wales is always 
a favorite, but the lion of the time is now the Shah— that big baby who 
has the right to wear a crown, and who comes to spend his holidays in 
Europe, and now particularly, it is said, in France. This unhappy sover- 
eign in vain announced in the papers that he was going to travel incogni- 
to ; he cannot come, or go, or live, or move at home or abroad, without 
being the object of the scarcely pardonable curiosity of a crowd of sight- 
seers who never let him escape from view. On the Boulevards, at the 
Exhibition, no matter where, suddenly everybody begins to run in a cer- 
tain direction. Is it fire ? is it a mad panic of the crowd ? Where can, 
we go to be safe? Be tranquil ; it is only the Shah — making a sorry pun 
on the word chat — the mice who are running after him. — Geo. de Ladoz, in 
Coining Events. 

THE BERKELEY GYMNASIUM, 
A Preparatory School to the TTniversity. 

A first-class Boartliaig- School, cstal>]ishe<l in the Interests 
of higher education, and in oppueitiun to the cramming system of the small 
colleges and military academies o£ the State. The next term will commence July 
24th. Examination of candidates for admission July 22d and 23d, By request, in- 
structions have been provided during the Summer months for students preparing for 
the August examinations at the University. 

For catalogues or particulars address , JOHN F. EURRIS, Berkeley, Cal. 

Note.— We desire to call special atiention to the organization of our Grammar De- 
partment, separate from the Academical, and solicit the ijatronage of parents and 
guardians of small boys. June 8. 

WASHINGTON COLLEGE, 
■Washington, Alameda County, California. 

The Thirteenth Semi-Annual Term of this institution will 
commence on THURSDAY, August 1st, 1878. For fidelity and ability in 
teachers, for purfxises of a solid, practical education, and for healthfulness and beauty 
of surroundings, this institution will compare favorably with any on the Pacific 
Coast. For catalogues and further information, address 
July 6. S. S. HARMON, Principal. 

CALIFORNIA PAPER COMPANY. 

Office: No. 10 California street, S. F.: Mills: at Stockton, 
California, Manufacture and offer for sale : News Print Paper, Job Print Pa- 
per, Straw Wrapping Paper, Binders' and Box-Makers' Straw Board. Any sizes aud 
weights of above made to order. EGBERT J UDSON, President. 
EUGENE T. COOPER. Secretary. July 13. 

A YOUNG LADY 

Of refinement desires a position as Governess orCompan-, 
ion. Is competent to teach En;;lish, French, Music and Drawing. Address 
GOVERNESS, News Letter Office. June 8. 

E. H. Tharp] THARP & KNOX, [Geo. T. Knox. 

Notaries PnMic and Commissioners of I>eef)s, No. 316 Mont- 
gomery street. Loans made on approved Securities. Real Estate bought and 
sold. Collections made. June 8. 

CHARLES LE (JAY, 
American Commissioa Merchant, - - 1 Rue Scribe, Paris. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTPER AND 



JiOy 20, 1878. 



THE NEWS LETTER'S TVTENTY-SECOITO BIRTHDAY, 
^to-day the News Letter completes the twenty-second year 
of its existence, an age which, in this country, is unusually great 
for a newspa-per. During thia long period, the Xfews Letter has 
certainly passed througli all the varied experiences which can well 
fall to the lot of a paper. It has attempted much, dared much, and 
accomplished much. It has corrected abuses and encouraged enterprise. 
It has never shrunk from assailing crime in high places, or from protect- 
ing the weak from the oppression of the strong. It has performed many 
signal public services— notably, the uprooting of medical quackery. It 
has exposed fraud wherever it could be unearthed. It has frightened, 
ridiculed, or persuaded innumerable wrong-doers into a sense of what 
was right. In pursuing this course, it has neither shown fear nor favor, 
an«l has, therefore, doubtless made some enemies ; but for every one of 
these it has gained a thousand friends, as its present prosperity and popu- 
larity amply prove. For many years past no paper in America has been 
so respected for its opinions, so widely quoted, or so universally read as 
the News Letter, and the cause is not far to s^ek. In the first place, its 
pages have always been written by the very best literary talent that money 
could secure. There is not a clever pen on the coast, in whatever direction 
its cleverness may lie, but what either is or has been a contributor to the 
News Letter. In the second place, this paper has no equal in the cosmo- 
politan and all-comprehensive nature of its contents. We can say, with 
pardonable egotism, that every number is an unrivaled repe^-toirc of wit, 
wisdom, and information. What theme is there to which the Ncids Letter 
does not tune its harp, sharpen its sword, or train its intellect every week ? 
And is not every department excellent in its way? Who can doubt the 
solid knowledge of the man who writes " Biz," the perspicacity of the 
stock reporter, the scorching satire of the immortal Town Crier, the lite- 
rary acumen of the book reviewer, the nice taste of the art critic, or the 
sound judgment of the theatrical expert? The leading articles of the 
News Letter are acknowledged to be, by all odds, the best written on the 
coast, and its feast of local news and gossip the most choice and com- 
plete. Not a single prominent interest of the city, State, or nation, 
ever escapes its comment, and its utterances were never known to 
"straddle the fence." But, not content with confining itself to what is 
generally known as '* news," the News Lettei- ransacks the world for all 
that is fresh in science, instructive in literatxu-e, or beautiful in poetry. 
Its selections, culled by a master-hand from sources many of which are 
accessible to that hand alone, have earned for the paper a high reputation 
among those fastidiously cultured classes who would scorn to glance at 
any periodical but this. Turning again to a more practical feature, the 
News Letter offers to business men an opportunity of advertising " where 
it will do the most good," and in a manner which brings about the most 
immediate results. Our Notabilia have made the whole world laugh, and 
»re so Irequently copied by other papers that the advertiser generally 
grows famous before he knows it; while the more serious forms of adver- 
tising with which our columns abound are given great weight by circulat- 
ing among the very best and most opulent classes of society. These are 
the reasons why the News Letter' is so much talked about, so much read, 
and so much sought after. And now, having presented ourselves with a 
little laudation as a birthday gift, we beg to thank our contributors, our 
wonderful growing list of subscribers throughout the world, our ad- 
vertisers, and our readers generally, for their appreciation of our trans- 
cendent merits, and to inform them all that the old News Letter will in 
future be more deserving of their favors than ever, in that henceforward 
it will appear in the shape it takes to-day, namely — 24 pages, including 
the tinted covers, which are themselves a most excellent medium of pub- 
licity for those who believe that to advertise is to grow rich. 

THE PATRIOTIC JANUS. 
The meanest of men, and the most self-disrespectful, is the man who 
denies his coimtry. Peter, who deniec^ his master, was a model of honor 
beside one of these, for the loudest-voiced chanticleer might crow a mil- 
lion times, to say nothing of three, without making the renegade weep. 
Yet there are plenty of such men among us, without counting the Irish, 
whose tendency in this direction is too well known to need comment. It 
is all very well for a man to become a citizen of this country, and, having 
become such, it is his duty to speak and think well of it; but it is not 
his duty, nor is it becoming to him, to speak against the land of his birth. 
Yet, if he did even this "honestly and in the face of the world, the most 
one could do would be to call his good taste into question. It is only 
when he suits his sentiments to his company that the forsworn foreigner 
becomes utterly despicable. There are, for instance, persons born in 
England (we cannot call them Englishmen) who, in the company of 
Americans, can see no good in the mother- country, while in the company 
of Englishmen they are Johnny Bulls of the first watei', and enemies of 
everything republican. It is seldom long before they are found out, and 
then of course they lose the respect of their original people, who want 
them no longer, and of their adopted brethren, who cannot lielp regret- 
ting that such unworthy fellows have inflicted their citizenship upon 
them; but at the same time their conduct is distressing to men of more 
grit and bottom. 

The marriage of Miss Kittle W. Jenks, granddaughter of the late 
George S. Bang?, and daughter of Alb-rit Jenks, of San Francisco, to 
Cai>tain (.'harles L. Sonntag, San Francisco, was solemnized last Tuesday 
night at the Woodrutf House, Chicago, Bishop Cheney officiating. 



THE NEWS LETTER'S SOLILOQUY. 

I'm twenty-two years old to-day ; 

Not very old for you, 
Dear reader, but consider, pray, 

The work I've had to do — 
The trials, the tempests, and the risks 

Which I have battled through. 
Ah, me ! on this, my natal day, 

I clutch them up in sheaves — 
These pages, dim and yellow now, 

These musty, dusty leaves, 
These printed cobwebs of an hour 

Which my creator weaves. 
A thousand times I've leapt to life. 

Armed cap-a-pie for fight ; 
With jewels of thought and words of steel 

My armor glistened bright ; 
And week by week I've cleared the lists. 

And turned the wrong to right. 
My laurels? Here they are, preserved — 

A few old numbers, dead. 
Forgotten, moulded long ago, 

Yet, once, of each 'twas said: 
" A splendid paper, sir, to-day! " 

Bah! pride from me has fled, 
For well I know that all my kind. 

How well soe'er they speak, 
How good soe'er their thoughts and words, 

Or grand the goal they seek. 
Can only flap their wings and crow, 

And die within a week. 



ANOTHER MEDICAL (?) INSTITUTE. 
On Clay street, between Montgomery and Kearny, on the south side, 
there are displayed several signs announcing that Doctor A. C. Stoddart, 
M.D., relieves the atflii-ted, cures the diseased, and would be delighted to 
have y(m walk in and enjoy a "free" consultation. We thought when 
we exposed the Luscomb-Thornton combination, and other kindred dens 
of quackery, that we had chased the last quack doctor out of the city, 
and effectually checked a trade which is ten degrees worse than grand lar- 
ceny and meaner than the occupation of a sneak-thief. Dr. Stoddart 
pursues exactly the same method as his numerous confreres all over the 
continent, and has, of course, several runners out. The runner meets a 
man on the street, claims acquaintance with him, finds out that he is from 
the country and under medical treatment. This information he often 
gets from hotel registers, or by hanging round the invalid's lodging house. 
The runner then informs the poor dupe that the latter's disease is just 
what he has been suffering from himself, and that, when on the verge of 
the grave, he was snatched from the jaws of death bj'- the skill of " Doc- 
tor A. C. Stoddart, M.D." He is just going to get his last bottle of medi- 
cine, and won't the gentleman from the country accompany him ? It costs 
nothing, and the doctor is such a perfect gentleman, etc., etc. The rest 
of the story is soon told. The poor roped-in individual goes up to the 
ofifice, is put in a dark room, frightened out of his wits, and bled out of 
the last dollar he has, only to find out, when it is too late, the true charac- 
ter of the institution. Doctor A. C. Stoddart, M.D., is assisted by a tall 
convict, whom he palms off as a physician. One poor fellow came here 
recently, looking for a respectable practitioner, was roped in, and fleeced 
of S50 in advance. On examining the card of the concern, he found out 
that the name of the physician whom he supposed he was consulting was 
not on it. The "Institute" denied that he had been duped, and claimed 
that "all the physicians" came here to consult, and that it was all right. 
Another went there with dj'Spepsia, and wastold that it was a " godsend" 
he had come that day. In three days more he would have been dead, as 
they were convinced he was suffering from organic disease of the heart, 
and there was a hole eaten right through that organ. They fleeced him 
of S50 down, and made him promise to come back next day with SlOO 
more. All the medicine he got was a black bottle. In fact, all 
that a man has to do to verify the assertions in this article, is to tie his 
face up in a red handkerchief, put on an old suit of clothes, and cough 
feebly anywhere near Pacific or Jackson street, and a sympathetic runner 
will introduce him to "The Doctor " in no time. "Doctor" Stoddart 
has come here since our last " Quack List " was published, but the Neivs 
Letter is, as ever, ready to give him proper attention and make public his 
many and varied att ainments. 

THE ODD PELLOW^S' JOINT STOCK BANK. 
The ■work of subscribing the guai'antee fund to the Odd Fellows' 
Bank is progressing most satisfactorily. President Heller, Messrs. Lissak, 
Randolph, Tilton, Levy, Patrick, and the Secretary, Mr. Benson, are 
still at work reorganizing, havibg been reappointed at a meeting held on 
Wednesday evening to complete their labors. The new condition of 
things was freely discussed and stockholders congratulated at the solid 
basis on which the Bank now stands. The sum of §250,000 is required 
as a guarantee fund, of which §126,000 has been subscribed by depositors, 
the balance accruing from fresh sources. The quarterly statement, 
shortly to be issued, will show a list of 4,000 depositors, forming a capital 
of §3,000,000. The completion of the guarantee fund will give a subscrip- 
tion of §300,000 above all liabilities to depositors. By turning the Bank 
into a joint stock company, it is placed in a position of financial solidity 
bej'ond all possible disaster. One quarter of the entire capital subscribed 
will, by resolution, be paid in at once. 

The query is daily propounded to us, Wlio is to carry on the vast 
traffic heretofore done by our late friend, Isaac Friedlander ? It seems to 
us a great shame that this large business, heretofore conducted with great 
and eminent ability, should be scattered to the winds. Why is not an 
effort made by the employes of the late Grain King to secure this branch 
of trade. One would suppose that li. Emmet Doyle, so long at Fried- 
lander's desk, would be able, with McLaughlin and Bert, attaches of the 
house, to secure the needed capital to carry on successfully a portion at 
least of the grain and shipping business, which fur more than a quarter of 
% century has been conti-olied by the firm of Isaac Friedlander. Who will 
gife the boys a lift? 



July 20, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"Hwnr tlie Crier!" "What the devil art IboaT* 
'One llml will play Iho ttovil. sit. with you." 

" He'd a Mtiutt in bin tail as Ions as a tiail, 
Wbicli made him crow bolder and boldor." 



A horrible tragedy hiis jui»t been enacted at Sacramento, and which 
ilhistrates man's perhdy and woman's fatal sin of curiosity. A young 
lady, livings' on Elderberry street, recently jilted a young taxidermist, 
wh«im she was to have married ne.\t FnU. He diHcovered who his dread 
rival WHS. and reproached the faithless sweetheart for her perfidy. Durinj,' 
the altercation a beiuitiful «ky terrier, belonying to the latter, couceiveti 
its mistre-ss to bo in danger, and sprang upon the discurdeii lover. 'J'he 
incensed uiau at once killed the animal with liis caue. Afterwards he be- 
came apparently rec»mcilcd to the change of atfairs, and offered to stuff 
the dui: and leave the country for ever. In a few days the pet was re- 
ceived by the girl nicely mounted, hut with a singular tag attached to its 
uollar. This, bore the words, " Don't scorch its tail." Day after 
day the puzzled young woman racked her brains over this legend. 
What an absurd thing 't Who woidd ever want to scorch 
a stuffed dog's tail, anyway? She at once concluded her old love had be- 
come crazy through disappointment regarding herself. All the same, 
however, as our lady readers have already surmised, it was not long be- 
fore she (lUi light a candle, and held it within an inch of her deceased 
pct".s caudal appendage. Our innumerable intelligent readers can imagine 
what fcdlowed. In the dog's body was concealed a pint can of nitro- 
glycerine, the fuse of which extended through the tail. The only piece 
of the girl which could be found after the explosion, lover No. 2 now car- 
ries round in his locket, while the villain of the tragedy has fled to for- 
eign lauds to become a Corsair, or bank President, or something. 

A young lady traveling in the stage-coach from Eedville to the Yo- 
seraite, a week or two ago, was suddenly requested by one of the passen- 
gers to conceal about her a large solitaire diamond ring, as some suspi- 
cious characters were seen ahead. The latter turned out to be highway- 
men in good earnest, and went through the passengers in the most ap- 
proved Vasquez style. After they had departed it was discovered the 
young lady referred to had swallowed the diamond in her fright. On 
reaching the next station the owner of the ring suggested au emetic, but 
the lady had time to think it over, and refused to take the dose unless 
she was first paid a hundred dollars salvage. This was refused, and now 
the ring owner is following the fair swallower around the country, se- 
cretly sprinkling Ipecac in her food and generally putting up jobs for the 
recovery of his property. He had her arrested for theft, but the Judge 
dismissed the case, and the indignant female has since tacked on an addi- 
tional fifty dollars for storage. The stone is worth two thousand dollars, 
and the case grows daily more interesting. We shall keep our readers 
duly advised of the outcome of both. 

Mr. BrickTwedel, the Supervisor, ought to be satisfied. He has had 
liis unexampled integrity and uuheard-of honesty paraded in the newspa- 
pers to his heart's content. Not only this, but he has frightened his col- 
leagues into humbly begging him to come back into the fold, even if they 
have in future to let him into the little jobs from which, we suspect, they 
formerly kept him imprudently out. If anything more sublimely absurd 
than this pout, kiss and make up business has ever occurred in this vi- 
cinity, we should be glad to know it. The mystified public will please 
hereafter picture in its mind's eye Mr. B. seated on the right hand of the 
Chairman, clad in virgin white, and with a saintly nimbus around his 
head, one hand picking out Sunday-school hymns on a golden harp, while 
the other — well, the other will be quietly groping round under the table 
for stray checks and other little "divvya" of the day. 

A gaunt young female, with a step like a flat-boatman wading ashore, 
came into this otfice last week and requested the publication of an original 
poem, entitled, "Why Should the Spirit of Mortal Be Proud?" She said 
she would do even better after the winter preserves had been put up and 
she had finished making a new polonaise that now exclusively occupied 
her intellect, but her pastor and many friends were quivering with anxiety 
tosee the above-mentioned gem in print without delay. We don't see any rea- 
son ourselves why the spirit should be proud of a mortal who would pirate or 
further perpetuate "Lincoln's favorite poem," and the most hackneyed 
piece of rhymed balderdash in the country. The name of this foe to the 
human race is Clara Dorfendigger, and at whom we beg herewith to point 
the unending finger of scorn and things. Clara^ reform. 

The pleasing custom of fraternal slaughter still exists among the brave 
descendants of Brian Bhoru in Canada every twelfth of July, and it is a 
poor day when the slain do not equal the original loss at the battle of the 
Boyne. One of the saddest incidents connected with the troubles at Mon- 
treal, a week ago, is the case of Mr. Phelim McCinniss, who, in order to 
avoid trouble, had a reversible green overcoat with an orange lining. He got 
along very well until the evening by changing his coat as often as circum- 
stances required, until he unfortunately found himself between two squads 
of Fenians and Orangemen. He had just succeeded in turning his left 
sleeve when — well, may his soul rest in peace ! 

In another column will be found a description of the arrival of a real 
young mermaid at the Westminster aquarium. It has been visited by 
thousands of bachelors in fishy circumstances, but she is so scaly and cold 
in her manner that not even the offer of one undivided half of a coral pal- 
ace has as yet induced one of them to take the marine matrimonial 
plunge. They retire murmuring in a melancholy manner the old refrain : 
" I wish I was a fish with a great long tail, 
A tiny little tittlebat, a winkle, or a whale, 
At the bottom of the deep blue sea." 

A party of yoimg stock brokers, who had dined well and wined 
better, started out to serenade a young lady in a hack. Tlie driver mis- 
took the directions, and the evening was foggy; but the crowd were slightly 
disgusted after singing " Baby Mine" three times without being invited 
into the house, to find that they had been performing in front of a Found- 
ling Hospital the whole time. In vino veiHtas. 

The other day, as two newly arrived Micks were walking up Kearny 
street, a pavement trap-door opened and a Chinese store-porter emerged. 
" Be gorra !" said one of the Paddies, " if the haythens haven't got a tun- 
nel clane thro' from Chinee, bad luck to thim !'* 



The corruption of thf'"*'^y ReSOrt S. ^ ^ 

extended even to the foitu ' " " 1 to 

an astrologer the other da.^N HOUSE, PESCADEEO. ujiy 

soothssvyer for nix years, a)losrotlior witli tlie <letaclied rottB«r«jvnd 
l)aid §2 50 for a first class 'f >t« attnictivo fcaturua, luive boon newly furniwl^,j.j^ 
of good news and the life-'"r t*'" "-^^^I't'"" ^' i-'J'cs^- T''"?« ^"^J"'."?'. '" ^U, '9 



ii-uiile resort,^, can niiiku 110 mistake in deciding u| , 



mustache. So far from tl 
just lieard that her unmi EASILY REACHED, has 

married a widow with foui * ■, i- . ... , » . •, aded 

. 1] I • 1 ■ ii c ■ «u<^" of 'ts eliniivtL', thu hcjiuty of its scenery, aiu, 'v 

hoodlum hid in the refrige,,,,^^!,^,,,,^. ,^.^ i,,,,^,, Those ^xtraordinarypcbllittlo 

Johnny s new suit ot ch)tl,ite3, opals, sappliires, etc., woro never so nuniuffsity 
our aheet-anohors fail us, J thrown up inunense numbers of curiously-shi 
A hrtrriWw «»o-h*- f..,n 1 subicutcd to the everlasting motiona of the tir< ., 



The other day a man got 
be awakened. By that " 



■JO is obtainable in the PeBcadero river. 
.3 fixed to suit the times. 



him. Notwithstanding h(. 

the order of a Director, 

seat of the car, where he i' . . ^ ^. 

Honda, send on and ran"«' «"*' I"'*"*""*-**" »>y *";« " 

, ^ ' , 1 1 • . Jia as tlic only i>laco for a ^jood bath oi 

ductor punches a hole m ti ,„„n«i,>,-^ »r ti... rinnr. «»^ i.i,rh v.-,.t*.r 



rA„ :i (before 
t^f^lilbout 
^l by 



':e swimming baths, , . 

on Central Avenue, Alameda BeacI^^ ^^ 
elite 

on the Pi 



'Jle in 
con- 



l uionstei's of the deep, and high water at all t"^^^' 



be a 



he owed the company ovei 

mass-meeting or somethiDj^o^^tio^g j^^ j^^^^^^ Unattended. 

Ixn so :sfrom San Francisco by steamer NEWARK— ( 
Landlord iViiilV,-'xjinii-inA.J["im..£Wtln-iid hu hnraii, 

I've not had a wink of sleep. 

Landlord Mine, Landlord Mine. 

I swear I'm almost dead, 

Most a gallon I have bled, 

There are bed bugs in my bed, 

Landlord Mine, Landlord Mine. 
At one of our local theaters a daring and adventurous steropticon 
man has been presenting the figure of a beautifully dressed young lady, 
whose garments gradually dissolve into thin air, one by one, disclosing 
in the end a modern edition of the Venus d'Medici. Immense crowds of 
unbelieving and synical bachelors gather to watch the process with awe- 
struck countenances. A wicked friend of the writer's says that as the 
primary formation is reached, the silence is so deep one can almost hear 
the pacls drop. 

Be it remembered that before the late city election each and every 
member of the present Board of Supervisors laid his hand upon his 
would-be-municipal-heart and solemnly declared that he, at least, would 
keep the streets clean if elected. Well, they were elected, since when 
another year's filth has been added to the quarter century of muck through 
which we wade. It is just possible that these perennially registered vows 
may be kept by doomsday, but so far doomsday has the call in the pool. 

We have received from the eminent photographer, Mr. Muybridge, 
a series of small photographs, evidently intended to represent a trotting 
horse in an epileptic fit, or something. It may be all very good fun for 
Mr. M. to stand coolly by and take pictures of a poor animal in the 
agonies of blind staggers or stomachache, but he will find himself in a 
tight place when the Prevention of Cruelty Society gets wind of it; and 
so we tell him. 

The cook of the Rolling Lizzie had the bad taste — being a good cook — 
to fall into the bay last Sunday and get drowned. The President of the 
contemplated Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Shell Fish smiled 
when he heard of the accident, and said that there was a poetic justice in 
it, and that now the shrimps' turn bad come. Somehow the latter do 
seem to be a little fatter the last day or so. What friend of his will throw 
overboard another cook? 

"The Recollections of a Cab Driver," is shortly to be issued by 
Bancroft. What a terrible list of robberies, extortions and violence will 
be then unfolded! One remarkable fact is that half the bald-headed caji- 
italists in the city are trying to discover the number of the particular cab, 
whose history is given. " Hope it aiut my regular man," said a broker, 
the other day; horrible idea, by Jove! " 

It seems Jim Fair has a brother in Ireland, from whom he is es- 
tranged, and who every year gravely put a notice in the county newspa- 
per, warning tradespeople not to trust Jim on his account. The last ad- 
vertisement contained the additional line, "American papers please 
copy." Jim's brother needn't worry. Out here we don't trust him on 
any account. 

The "Record," of Peru, HI., intimates that its editor is coming out 
in this direction, next Fall, and that the T. C. will get a "regular west- 
ern head" put on him if we say anythingjmore about the Jtecord's steal- 
ings from this column. His is a very poor article of Peruvian bark. 

A Dutch peddler rang the bell of the Ellis-street Convent the other 
day, and tried to sell some new patent milk bottles. The Sister Superior 
said that if it hadn't been Saint Hannah Maria's day she would have hit 
him over the head with a flat-iron. 

The editor of the Alta says " Kearney is now standing at the verge of 
an awful chasra." Then there must be a good chance for the militia to 
fix bayonets, take off its shoes, sneak up behind and suddenly prod him 
overboard. 

The famous Athletic Base-Ball Nine are on their way hither ; and 
already our local players take turns in pounding each other in the stomach 
with a mallet. There is nothing like preparation in advance. 

Is it not a significant sign of the frivolity of the times that in Peta- 
luma the other day two funerals were adjourned half an hour to see a 
circus procession pass ? 

The State Advisory Board have suggested that the training-shipput 
off its cruise until August. " This scheme is Glass — the very sun shines 
through it." 

A horse named Mongolian won the Ladies* Plate at New Orleans the 
other day against foxnteen others. The Chinese must go like the very 
dickens. 

The Ceylon sponge fisheries are said to be nearly exhausted. Thank 
Heaven, we have an endless supply in our native bar-rooms. 

Hadn't some of the dailies better bring out the.Mollie McCartliy 
race in book form, and be done with it. 

The last issue of a scurrile, not to say reptile, contemporary calls the 
Town Crier a "funny man." Is it possible we have deserved this? 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LET«ER AND 



July 20, 1878. 



IE NEWS IiETTER'S TWENTY-S 

To-day the News Letter completes t 

its existence, an age which, in this c 
a newspp.per. During this long peril 
tainly passed through all the varied ex 
1 to the lot of a paper. It has attemptt 
pmplished much. It has corrected abuses 
nas never shrunk from aBsailing crime in 1 
the weak from the oppression of the stron 
lal public services — notably, the uprootinc 
' exposed fraud wherever it could be un 
!culed, or persuaded innumerable wrong-i 
) right. In pursuing this course, it has nei 
1 has, therefore, doubtless made some ene: 
ge it has gained a thousand friends, as its i 
ity amply prove. For many years past no 
leapected for its opinions, so widely quote- 
iNews Letter, and the cause is not far to si 

,bu liavp alwavs llPPn -urfitfi." 1 — J-' '" ^ 

"Coming Events " says; That the reason of 
Bismark having urgently pressed both upon En- 
gland and Kussia the necessity of coming to 
terms was the fear which he had cause to enter- 
tain lest the Czar, if hard pressed for money, 
should apply to the private treasure of the Em- 
peror of Germany. That there is every proba- 
bility of a meeting of the three Emperors taking 
place as soon as the main work of the Congress 
13 over, for the purpose of arriving at a common 
understanding on the suppression of Socialism. 
That it is asserted in diplomatic circles that, in 
consequence of the real work of the Congresa 
being actively carried on by private interviews 
of the Plenipotentiaries, there is every chance of 
a treaty being signed next week, after which the 
minfir points would be left to the consideration 
of the second and third delegates. That one of 
the most interesting features of the Paris Exhi- 
bijiion are the " promenade conferences " in the 
gallery of Anthropological Sciences, under such 
cicerones as M. de Mortillet and Dr. Bertillou. 
That the King of Portugal has arrived in Paris 
under the name of Duke de Villavicioaa, with 
his morganatic wife, Countess di I'Edla, and his 
son, the Duke of Coimbre. He is at the Grand 
Hotel, on the same flat as the Duke d'Aosta. 
That a schoolboy of fifteen years, at Erankfort, 
has been condemned to two months iraiMson- 
ment in a fortress for having expressed his regret 
at the failure of the Nobling attempt. 




("lomraeuciugr Suiiflay, July l4tli, 1S7S, 
J Passenfjer Tniins will leave San Francisco, from 
Passeii'rer De^wt on Townsend street, between Tliird 
and Fourth streets, as follows ; 



Q QA A.M. daily for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollistor, Tres 
'-'•^^ Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all Way 
Stations. ^^ At Pajaro. the Santa Cniz R. R. con- 
nects with this train for Ajttoa and Santa Cruz. 
6^^ At Salin.vs the SI. & S. V. R. R. connects with 
this train for Mo nter ey, g^™ Staoe connections made 
with this train, g^^" Parlor Car attached to this train. 



1 O 4-0 ■*'^'' ^''''y ^"'" ^*" ^°^^ ^^^ ^^'^-J' Stations. 



3^C\ P-M. daily (Sundays excepted) for Gilroy, Pa- 
*^yj jaro, Hollister, TresPinos and Way Stations. 
^^ Stage Connection made with this train at Santa 
Clara for Pacific Congress Springs. 

E^*g " On Satltrdays only, the Santa Cruz*ll. R. con- 
nects with this train at Pa-taro for Aptos and Santa 
Cruz. Rrturniso, passengers leave Santa Cruz at 4:30 
A. 11. Mondays (breakfast at Gilroy), arriving in San Fran- 
cisco at 10:00 A.M. 



A. zj-O '"'"' t'^'^'^J') ^""^ S^'* ^^^^ ^^^ ^^ Stations. 
I* OA P.M. (daily) for Menlo Park and Way Statioua. 

^r* SUNDAYS an EXTRA TRAIN will leave for San 
Jose and Way Stations at 9:30 a-m. Returning, will 
leave Sail Jose at tf:00 p.m. 

^^ Excursion' Ticukts to San Jose and other points 
and return sold on Saturday's and Sunday mornings. 
Good for return imtil following- Monday inclusive. 

A, C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 

H. R. JUDAH, Assistant Passenger and Ticket Agent. 



iKOVTHEKMr DIVISIONS. 

^Sf- Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Lauding, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave, Los 
Angeles. Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton, Colorado River 
and Yliia. July 20. 



S. p. C. R. R. 

CNAEEOW GAUGE.) 

XEW ROUTE TO ALA9IEOA, SAN JOSE 
AN1> SANTA CKUZ. 

SUttMEE ARRANGEMENT, 1878. 

Conimcuclng' Sntarday, June 1, 1S7S, 
and until further notice, trains and boats will leave 
San Fniuciseoat the New Ferry Landing, Market street: 



K (^/^ a. M., via Alameda Ferry, daily, for Alameda, 
^* ^ ^-^ West San Leandro, West San Lorenzo, Mount 
Eden. Alvarado, Hall's, Newark, Mowry's, Alviso, Ay- 
ncw's, SantaClara, San Jose, Luvelady's, Los Gatos, Alma. 



9 0r^ A, St., via Alameda Ferry, daily, for Alameda; 
• ^v-' Newark, Alviso, Santa Clara, San Jose, Los 
Gatos, Alma, and all Way Stations, connecting at Los 
Gatos with Colgrove's stages for Oil Wells, Patchen, 
Mountain Charley's, Martin's Ranch, Scott's Valley and. 
Santa Cruz, or via Wright's Summit, Hotel de Itedwood, 
Conutock's Mill, Mason's Grove, Sequel to Santa Cruz. 
Also connecting at Los Gatos with Blabon's stages for 
Saratoga and Congress Springs. (Dinner at Los Gatos.) 



p. M., via Alameda Ferry, daily, for Alameda, 
Newark, Santa Clara, San Jose, Alma, and 
all Way Stations. 



4.20' 



giT* On Saturdays only stages will connect with the 
4.20 P.M. train at Los Gatos for Santa Cruz and Saratoga, 
Returning, leave Santa Cruz at 4 a.m., Monday (l)reakfast 
at Los Gatos), arriving in San Francisco at 10.15 A-M. 



Ferries aud I<ocal Trains will Run as 
Follows: 



LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO DAILY. 



LEAVE HIGH STREET (ALAMEDA) DAILY. 



p.SL 
•3.00 



•Sundays only. 
TUOS. CARTER, 
Superintendent. 



GEO. H. WAGGONER, 
[June 1.] Gen. Pas. tfc Tkt Agt. 



C. p. R. R. 



Commencing Wednesday, 7uly 10th, 1878, and un- 
til farther notice, Trains and Boats will Leave 
SAN FRANCISCO: 



7f\f\ A. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
*\j\J Street Landing — Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Soni>nia), Oalistoga (the Geysers), 
ami Sacramento. Connecting at Davis (Sundays except- 
ed) for Woodland, Williams and Knight's Landing. 

(Arrive San Francisco 8:55 p.m.) 



8f\C\ A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
•"'-' land Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland (Or.), Colfax, Reno (.Virginia City), Pali- 
sade (Eureka), Ogden and Omaha. Connects at Gait 
with train arriving at lone at 3:40 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:35 p.m.) 



8 0/^ A.M. (Sundays only). Special Train via Oak- 
• Ox/ land Ferry, arrives at Martinez 10.15 A.M. 
Returning, leaves Martinez 4.10 P M,, arrives San Fran- 
cisco G:00 P.M "Excursion. Tickets at Reduced Rates." 



9^i\ A.M. (Sundays excepttd). Northern Railway 
• Ot/ Accommodation Train (via Oakland Ferry) 
to Martinez. (Arrive San Francisco 3:35 p.m. 



land Ferry and Nilcs), stopping at all WaySta- 
Arrives at San Jose at 5:30 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 A.M.) 



3 0/\ P.M. (daily) Northern Railway Passenger Train 
• *^" (via Oakland FeiTy) to San Pablo and Mar- 
tinez. (Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



4- no ^'^'^- (<^^'^>') Express Train (via Oakland Ferrj'), 
'**^^ for Lathropand Stockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
ner, Mojave, Newhall (San Buenaventura, Santa Barhara), 
Los An'qeles, "Santa Monica," Wilmington, Santa Ana 
(San Diego), Colton and Yuma (Arizona Stages and Colo- 
rado River Steamers). 

"Sleeping Cars" between Oakland, Los Angeles and 
Yuma. Connects at Niles with train arriving at San 
Jose at 6:55 p.m. (Arrive San Francisco 12:40 p.m.) 



A f\C\ P. M. (Sundays excepted; VallejoSteamer (from 
J^'^jy^ Market Street Landing), connecting' with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento ; and at Sacramento with Pas- 
senger Train, leaving at 9:35 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thurs- 
days and Saturdays only, forTruckee, Reno, Oarsou and 
Virginia. 

" Sleeping Cars" between Vallejo and Carson. 

(Arrive San Francisco 11:10 a.m.) 



4 A A P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
,\J\J (from Wash'n St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sacra- 
mento at 9:00 A.M., daily. (Arrive San liVancisco 8:00 p.m. 



4 A P.M. (daily). Through Third Class and Accom- 
•<-*" modation Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, 
arriving at Los Angeles on second dayat 11:55 a.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 7:30 a.m. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS 



From * 


'SASr FRANCISCO," 


Daily. 


TO 

OAKLAND. 


< 

a 

.J 

< 


Si 




to 

3 


>- 

4 

03 










hjs 




a 


o 


A. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


Il(i 10 


12.30 


7.00 


B6.10 


S.OO 


8.00 


7.30 


B6.10 


7.C0 


1.00 


8.00 


7.30 


ta.so 


t9.30 8.30 


8.00 


7.30 


1.30 9.00 


8.30 


p. M. 


p. M. 9.30 


10.00 


S.OO 


2.00 


10.00 


9 30 


tl.OO 


3.001 10.30 


p. w. 


8.30 


3.00 


11.00 


10.30 


3.00 


4.00 


11.30 


3.00 


9.00 


3.30 


12.00 


11.30 


4.00 


(3.10 


P. M. 


4.30 


9.30 


4.00 


p. .M. 


p. M. 


ts.io 




1.00 


5.30 


10.00 


4.30 
5.00 
6.30 
6.00 


1.30 
2.00 
■3.00 
4.00 


12.30 
1.00 
3.30 
4.30 






4.00 
5.00 
6 00 




10.30 









11.00 








11.30 







12.00 


0.30 
7.00 


5.00 
6.00 


5.30 
6.30 








3.10b"7.<-'O 


7.00 








9.20Ib>3,10 


8.10 


tChange Cars 


Change Cars 




10,30:c'1030 


9.20 


at 


at 




B11.45!b»1145 


10.30 


East Oakland 


West O'kland 







Bll.45 





B— Sundays excepted. c— Sundays only. 

'Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 

To FERNSIDE — except Sundays — 7.00, 9.00, 10.00 
a.m., aud 5:00 P.M. 

To SAN JOSE— Dai l y— f9:30 A.M., .S:00, 4:00 p.m. 



To "SAN FKASCISCO," Dnlly 


. 


&3 




-< 




>l§i p| pBOM 


sis 

a 




i! 


k^ 


= 23 OAKLAND. 




-i 
< 


-i5 


1^3 


< (Broadway.) 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. A- M. 1 A. M. 


P. Jl. 


B6.30 


B5.40 


B-5.00 


(6.45 


n.03 B 5.101 B 5.20 


12.20 


8.00 


7.30 


B»5.40 


7.55 


8.15 B 5.50, B 6.00 


12 50 


10.00 


8.30 


■B25 


11.15 


11.36 6.40 


6.50 


1.20 


p. M. 


9.30 


7.00 


ni.45 


p. M. 7.40 


7.20 


1.60 


3.00 


10. .30 


8.03 


p. SI. 


tl2.03 8.40 


7.50 


2.50 


430 


1130 


9.00 


3.40 


4.03 9.40 


8.25 


3.20 


5.30 


p. M. 


10.03 




t4.45 10.40i 8.50 


3.50 












11.401 9.20 






4.00 1 12,00 
6.00 p. M. 














12.40 10.20 


5.20 




0.00 


1.00 
3.00 






1.25 10.50 
2.40 11.20 


6.60 






6.25 






■3.20 
4.00 




4.40 
5.40 


11.50 


6.50 
8.00 






6.00 




6.40 




9.10 


Chang 


eCars 


0.03 


tChange Cars 


7.50 




10.20 




t 
aklnd. 


B*7.20 
B'S.30 
•10.00 


at 

East Oak-land 


9.00 
10.10 






West L 

















!l 



B— Sundays excepted. 
♦Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 
From FERNSIDE— except Sundays— S.00, 10.00, 
A.M,, and 6,00 p..v. 
FROM SAN JOSE-Daily— 7:05 and 8:10 A.M^ 



CREEK KOl^TE. 

From SANFRANCISCO-/)ni;y-Bfl;30,E7:20, 8:15,9:15, 

10:15, 11:15 A.M , 12:15, 1:15, 2:25, 3:15, 4:15, 5:16, 

0:15 P.M. 
From OAKLAND— i>ai/y-B6:-20, b7:10, 8:05, 9:05, 10:05. 

11:05 A-M.. 12:0.5. 1:05. 2:1.5, 3:05, 4:05, 5:05, 6:05 P.M. 

B— Daily, Sundays excepted. 



Official Schedule Time" furnished by Andersox & 
Rasi)olp£I, Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. TowNK, General Superintendent. 



S. p. R. R. 

(NORTHERN DIVISION".) 
SPECIAIi APTNOlUrCEMENT. 

/^omtncnciii^ SatiirJay, July 13, 1878, 
\_j EXCURSION TICKETS will be sold by this Com- 
pany from SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN JOSE AND OTH- 
ER POINTS AND RETURN, 

At Greatly Reduced Rates. 

(Tickets to San Jose, good for Return by either the 
Southern or Central PaciOc Railroads.) 

These Tickets will be sold ONLY on SATURDAYS and 
SUNDAY MORNINGS. 

The RETURN TRIP Ticket will not be good for pas- 
sage after the MONDAY following the date of purchase. 

TICKET OFFICES— Piissenger Depot, Townsend St., 
and at Valencia street Station. 

A. C. EASSETT, Superintendent. 

H. R. JUDAH, Ass't Passenger and Ticket Ag't. 

Notice. —SAN JOSE Excursion Tickets (via C. P. R. 
R.) can be purchased at the offices of the Central Pacific 
Railroad, Oakland Ferry, foot of Market street, San 
Francisco; also at the several Ticket Offices in Oakland. 
rJnIv 20. 1 

CtJNARD lInE. 

British and North Americau Royal 
Mail Steamships between NEW YORK and LIV- 
ERPOOL, calling at t^UEENSTOWN, sailing from New 
York EVERY WEDNESDAY. 

BOTHNIA My 15- Je 19— Jy 24— A 23- .... -0 2 

ALGERIA My22— Je26— Jy31— ....— S 4-0 9 

RUSSIA My 29- .... — Jy 3— Ag 7-S 11-0 16 

SCYTIilA Je 5-Jy 10-A14..S18-O23 

ABYSSINIA -Je 12-Jy 17— A 21— S 25-0 30 

Passage can be secured and all information given on 
ap|)Iication to WILLIAMS, ULANCHARD & CO., 

May IS. 218 Califomia st. 



July 20, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVEKTISEU. 



13 



Notabiiia. 



* ' T^ell. X don't caro! SatAn wna ttharp niid knew wliut he wns About," 
BAiil u Itulv wtioMc liusl>Aiicl WHS liuUling tliu Hr«t woinnn reaiiouHiliIe foriiU 
tlie tnnihle in the world. "Ht* knew uii);hty well tlmt if he offered the 
ftplile to A<hau tirst he wouUI eat it all up himself aiul not yive Kvo a 
tiiHlf, iinti (io to he Mure of ^.'ettin;,' botli int^i a aorape lie gave Eve the fir»t 
chinue »t it." Well, if that ia true, tliey must huvobeiMi an ill-mannered 
couple. Where we dine, we notice seores of couples tbut don't act that 
way, but seeni nnxiuus to at leiist fairly divide their tid bits. But then 
the e/i/r iif San Francisco vLsit :^ictihi's 'Ji<»tiUiraiU, on Sutter street. The 
neatest, cleanest and best place in the city. 

The Irish Home Rtilers do not illustrate that amity which one would 
e.\|>t;et t>> hud in gentlemen bavin;; a common object 8o much at heart. 
The other niyht an honorable member of that pei-suasion was confiding- 
certain of his notions to Mr. Speaker and a more than usually patient 
House. The wurst of the obstructives, sitting: immediately behind the 
man in pos^esijion, hissed into his ear, "You'er an infawrumer, sorr." 
Turninf; tpiietly round, the orator retorted with bitterness, "If I had you 
outsoide oi'd punch your head." 

It is the confession of a widower, who has been thrice married, 
" that the first wife cures a man's romance, the second teaches him hu- 
mility, and the third makes him a philosopher." But our first has tau^dit 
us what his third did. We are now a philosopher. The true philosophy 
of life is to dine well, but you can't dine well unless your food is cooked 
to a turn. IJur first taught us that, by buj-iug a I)e La Montanya cook- 
ing range, and by its aid giving us dinners, they have made us a pbiloso- 
2)her. Jackson, below Battery. 

A French paper humorously illustrates the high charges in Paris 
during the Exhibition. At a restaurant, a gentleman who unmistakably 
does not belong to the light-fingered tribe, is openly — not furtively — shov- 
ing the spoons and forks into his pocket. The oarcoii says: "Allow me 
to observe, monsieur, that you are putting the silver articles in your 
nocket." "Well! are they not comprised in the dinner bill? I thought 
by the charge it included everything on the table! " 

A genius dow^n East intends applying for a patent on a machine 
which, he says, when wound up and in motion, will chase a hog over a 
ten-acre lot, catch, yoke, and ring him ; or, by a slight change of gearing, 
it will chop him into sausages, work -his bristles into shoe-brushes, and 
miinufactnre his tail into a corkscrew. That wonderful machine has been 
admirably photographed, and is now aiTumg Bradley & Rulofson's celebri- 
ties. They never miss a curiosity. The greatest photographers of the 
^'6, undoubtedly. 

My friend, if thou wouldst have knowledge of men, take all thy pos- 
sessiims, even unto the uttermost shekel, and enjoy thyself in the enter- 
tainment of each and every one who will gratuitously partake of thy 
bountiful goodness. This, so long as thy purse shall last. Then, when 
thou hast spent thine all, shalt thou have great wisdom, for thou shalt 
have learned that for what thou gavest thou shalt find none to offer unto 
thee a dinner in return ; nay, not so much as a sardine. 



A ^tty clergyman, accosted by an acquaintance by the name of 
Cobb, replied: " i don't know you, sir." " My name is Cobb, sir," re- 
joined the man, who was about half seas-over. '* Ah, sir," said the min- 
ister, " you have so much corn on that I did not see the cob." If the 
man had only taken Goldai Plantation Whisky he would have shown both 
the com and the cob ; in short, he would have been as true as all honest 
men are. F. & P. J. Cassin, Front street, are the agents. 



If Adam could for ten minutes come to life would he recognize the old 
place, the same old city lots, the same old lemons, oranges, figs, elephants, 
snakes, dandelions, pie plants, peanuts, sassafras and persimmons that he 
used to name up and chalk down? All would begone. He would recog- 
nize naught. But if he happened to wander into the negro minstrels he 
could hear the same old jokes. 

"We watch eagerly for the editor who first has the hardihood to 
"discover signs of returning properity." The papers began to discover 
signs much earlier than this last year. Probably there are fewer signs ; 
a good many bankrupt business men have taken down theirs during the 
past twelve months. But there is one sign in San Francisco that is al- 
ways in demand. The famous G-erke Wine is ever in demand. It ia sold 
by Landsberger, 10 and 12 Jones Alley. 

About the time a boy begins to think his mother doesn't know enough 
to select his clothing for him is a dangerous period in his history. If she 
has energy and muscle he can yet be saved. 

Just Published. — Every body should read the eighty pages, "An 
Appeal to Jews to Stimulate them to obtain a Higher State of Civiliza- 
tion," and other miscellaneous matter for the advancement of moral dis- 
cipline, by Semper Veritas. Sold at Archie Sinclair's book stand, south- 
east comer of Sutter and Dupont streets. 

" How nicely this com pops! "said a young man who was sitting 
with his sweetheart before the tire. "Yes," she responded demurely, 
"it's got over being g reen." 

For upwards of thirty years Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrdp has 
been used for children. It corrects acidity of the stomach, relieves wind 
colic, regulates the bowels, cures dysentei^y and diarrkcea, whether arising 
from teething or other causes. An old and well-tried remedy. Twenty- 
jive cents a bottle. 

The late Pope was a most merciful and bumane man. He left a pro- 
vision that his memoirs should not be published for ten years after his 
death, and made it a sine qtui non that the editor of them should drink 
nothing but N.vpa Soda, 



Country Resorts. 



SWANTON HOUSE, PESCADEBO. 

TlilM Popiilnr Ifolel, tosotlicr witli the <letnvlicil CottHS-eH, 
wlUch iiru not thu luiist of its attrictivu luaturca. have boun nowly furriinhuii 
throiiKhiuit, uiitl uru now opuii for tliu rucepLion of ffuoats. Tlioao ilusiriiig U> viuit 
thu uinyt ciijoyublu of ull our smi-sido rum>rl^, cuii niuku no misUike ui deciding upon 
Posouiero. 

IT IS EASILY REACHED, 
and is unsurpassed in the excellence of its climate, tho Imimt;' of its Bccnory, ami in 
the attractivciiess of its truly rcniarI<abIo sea buiwh. Tliosy cxtraoniiimry jit^blilus, 
among wliich arc to be found ngntos, upals, sajiphiros, etc., were nevur so mimi-rouH 
aa now, Iho past Winter huvinjf thrown up immense nuiniierti of curiously ■hIhujciI 
stoiica, whiiOi for a'/ps huve been subiected to the everlaatinjf motions of tho tiruiutid 
Pncillc. t.;i.»01) TKOUT i''iSllING is obtainable in the Peseadero river, 
t*?" The hotel prices are fixed to suit the times. [April 27. 

TEKR&CE SWIMMING BATHS, 
Foot of Webster Street, on Central Avenue, Alameda Beach. 

Now o|*eii to tbe pnblJc, anU pronoimeed by tlie ^^elitc"^ of 
San Fnineisco and Uuklaiid as the only jilace for a ^uod bath on tho Puciliu 
Coast. Perfect sticurity against monsters of the deep, and high water at all times 
of day and night. 

Special Accommodations for Ladies Unattended. 

Reached in thirty-five minutes from San Francisco by steamer NEWARK— depot 

on tho prenuses-or C. P. R. It. to Mastic Station, and from Oakland by horse-cars 

at Broadway Station, runuint,' within two blocks of Laths. 

BATHS, 25 CENTS, 

Includhiff Private Hoom, Sathing Suit, Towels, Shoiver JiatJis, etc, 

July 13. R. HALEY, Proprietor. 

OCEAN VILLA, 
Santa Cruz, California. 

Genrge Iff. Bliss, Proprietor.— LHrge, wcll-rnrnislicd Rooms, 
Single or in Suites. Uottag'es for families that desire them. Grounds large, 
romantic and pleasant. Situated forty feet above tide water, having a beautiful view 
of the Bay, Ocean, City and Mountains. Promises e.^tend to river's edjje, affording 
rare facilities for Boating, Bathing- and Fishing. No pains spared to please our 
guests. P. 0. Box 10(i. July 13. 

THE GKAND CENTRAL HOTEL, OAKLAND, CAL. 

JC. Olinsteil is liappy to auuouuec to his i'riciiils and the 
• public that he has become associated with MR. J. W. BLACIt, and it is pro- 
posed to make THK GRAND CIONTRAL as popular as it was during his former three 
years management. The prices for board and rooms are as reasonable as any one 
could desire, and the house and table will be kept fully up to its former reputation. 
Oakland, May 1, 1878^ May 18. 

PACIFIC OCSAN HOUSE, SANTA CRUZ, CAL. 

This cle^iiEit cstablishuieiit has been coiiii»leteIy reiiovateil 
throughout, and oifers special attractions and inducements to the public. 
The addition of a large play and CItOfiUET grounds, the increasing of DANCING 
accommodations, are the latest improvements for the pleasure of the guests. It is 
the ONLY hotel at Santa Cruz that can claim pre-eminence as a FIKST-CLASS 
HOUSE of entertainment, being the best regulated and sustained in this famous 
summer resort. [May 11.] J. H. HOAULEY, Pioprietor. 



PABISIAN HOUSE, San Eafael. 

The proprietor of tlie above favorite resort takes pleasure 
in infornui.g his patrons and the public that he has entirely renovated his es- 
tablishment, to which he has added a splendid Garden, with Arbors, Swings, and ev- 
erything for the comfort and amusement of visitors. Board and Lodging for Fam- 
ilies by the week or month at moderate prices. 
April 13. ETIENNE SIVIEROU, Proprietor. 

JULIAN'S HOTEL. 

The Ijargrest Country Blotel in the State. —Daucan's mill, 
Sonoma County, California.— J. JULIAN, Proprietor. — Terminus North Pacific 
Coast Railroad, and Connecting Point of all Stage Lines for the North Paeifie Coast. 
A favorite resort for Tourists, Hunting and Fishing Parties. April 13. 

PACIFIC CONGRESS SPRINGS. 

Open for the seasou on and after April 20 th. TakeS. P. B. 
K. first afternoon train to Santa Clara, and connect with stage for Springs. 
Time, S^houi-s. Good hunting and fishing; livery stable; telegraphic communication. 
April 8. LEWIS A. SAGE, Proprietor. 

TAMALPAIS HOTEL. SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

This honse has been i Itoron^hly renovated and newly fnr- 
nished, and is now open to the public. Persons wishing rooms should apply 
early. Climate unsurpassed. Terms moderate. Special Rates for Families. 
June 22. OSCAR LEWIS, Proprietor. 

SPORTSMEN'S EMPORIUM. 

Fishing- anil Hunting Pants and Stockings. Rods, Reels, 
Flies, and the Celebrated Si.'i-Splice Ramboo Salmon, Gritse, Bass and Ply 
Rods. Also the largest and finest assortment of Guns, Rilles, Pistols, Fishing Tackle 
and Spnrting Articles on the Pacific Coast. Breech and Muzzle -Loading Double and 
Single Guns from the best makers ; Remington Sporting Rifles ; Ballard, Sharp and 
Svinchester Rifles. Also the largest and most complete assortment of Sporting and 
Gunmakers' Materials in the United States. LIDDLE & KAEUING, 

April 27. 533 Washington street, San Francisco. 

SANTA CRUZ, 

Apartments consisting of two bedrooms and parlor, nicely 
furnished, with use of kitchen, in a private family. House and grounds close 
to sea-beach. Price, $40 per month. For particulars apply at this office. July 29. 

* SANTA CRUZ. 

Liddeirs Cottages, on the Beach, Pleasant and Commo- 
dious Rooms. Fine Scenery. §10 per Week. Surf Bathing Included. July 13. 

WiLSOS WniTE.] WHITE & KUHL, [H. G. Kuhl. 

Merchandise Brokers. Orain Sacks, TVooI Bags, Gniinies 
and Jute Goods generally. No. 316 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Fran- 
c isco, Cal. P. 0. Box 2,113. June 15. 

djh^l ^d\^\ Salary. Permanent salesmen wanted to sell 

^^ I .-^" 9% W staple Goods to dealers. No peddling, E.xpenses paid. Address 



Sept. L] 



S. A. GRANT & CO., 2, 4, 6 and S Home St., Cincinnati, O. 



gb ^Ttt g'/'kirf'k a Year. Agents wanted. Business legitimate. 

^/^iy\J\9 Particulars free. Address J. WORTH & CO., St. Louis, Mo. 

O Gold Plated AVatches, Cheapest in the known world. 

Sample Watch Free to Agents. Address A. COULTER & CO., Chicaeo. 



*3 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LITTER AND 



July 20, 1878. 



'Biz. 



The export movement of grain is not as active as we could desire, 
owing to light receipts of Wheat, the necessary result of a late harvest 
and the inability of farmers to give needed attention to the forwarding of 
the same to market when their whole time and energy is yet required in 
the harvest field. Only three ships have been cleared thus far during 
July for the United Kingdom, out of some forty vessels now on the 
berths. As before stated in the News Letter, July is not the month to 
look for any great outward movement in Wheat— too early in the season 
— and it not unfrequeutly happens that parties having vessels under char- 
ter for July loading find themselves in a tight place for Wheat, and per- 
haps forced to pay more or less demurrage before being able to secure all 
the carg(j. Several round purchases of choice Wheat for Spot delivery 
have been concluded at §1 70@S1 65, the latter the closing rate. 

The French bark Concordia has been chartered, at £3, to load 600 
tons Barley for Iquique. The bare announcement of this caused prices of 
Feed grain to advance from 90c. to SI 05 per ctl., while many farmers are 
storing their Barley in preference to making prompt sale to exporters. 
This is the more surprising when we consider the immensity of this year's 
crop, and the certainty of low prices for a long time to come, chiefly for 
want of an outlet abroad commensurate vnth the magnitude of our 
surplus crop. 

Com and Oats. — The stock of the former is exhausted, and we are 
compelled to draw upon Nebraska for needed supplies. Price, SI 90@S2 
per ctl. for Yellow, and for White S2 3n{SS2 50. The growing crop will 
be large. The stock of Oats is light, and we draw much of our supplies 
from Oi'egon and Washington Territory. Price, §1 35@,S1 65 per ctl. 

Potatoes and Onions. — Supplies of the new crop are both large and 
free, causing low prices to prevail; for the form,er $1 25@S1 50 per ctl., 
and for the latter 90c.@.?l. 

Hides and Tallow. — There is a good demand for the former at 15@ 
15^c. for Dry, and 8^',9c. for Wet Salted. Tallow is in lessened demand 
fur export, and may be quoted at 7(5j7ic. for ordinary, and 8@9c. for 
E-efJned. 

WooL — The present receipts are chiefly from Oregon, selling at 16@, 
18c. up to 20@24c. for selected lots of Fleece. In a few instances 25@27c. 
has been paid for Choice Oregon valley clips. Our receipts for six months 
of the two past years show a very large falling this season — say, 9,000,- 
000 lbs. This is the fruit of last year's drouth, and the fearful mortality 
of large flocks of sheep. It will take years fur us to recover the loss, as 
the severe Winter storms of this year and the cold Spring caused a fearful 
mortality among the lambs of the flock. 

Honey and Beeswax. — This season's crop of the former will be large 
but of the latter small. The present rate of Strained Honey, 5(S)7c. ; 
Comb, 10@l2ic. ^ lb. The ship St. David, for Liverpool, carried.lOO 
cases Iloney. 

Fruit — Our market is glutted \vith Oranges from the Society Islands. 
Imports this year have been large, say 3,500,000, and the price has fallen 
to S5@10 ^ M. Our spot sujiply of Apples, Berries, Figs, Peaches, 
Plums, Pears, etc., is very large and free, and the quality of this season's 
fruit superior ; prices for Strawberries and Blackberries so low as scarcely 
to pay for picking. Plums, of choice quality, have declined to 2c. ^ ft. 
Our local canners are full of business putting up large supplies of the 
choicest fruit— Jams, Jellies, etc. A very large quantity of Apricots has 
been canned, so also of Cherries, Currents, etc., and now Peaches and 
Pears command their attention. 

Freights and Charters. — There is of late rather more outside freight 
offering for Liverpool, such as Salmon, Orchilla, etc. ; rates, however, are 
very low. Wheat charters to the United Kingdom are at date scarce, 
and the rates both low and nominal, say 45CS;50 shillings. We have in 
port at this date a fleet of 45 disengaged vessels — registered tonnage, 53,- 
4G8 tons. The engaged fleet on the berth for Grain, some forty large 
ships. We do not look for any activity in the freight market for some 
weel« to come, as there are now more vessels chartered for Wheat than 
can be loaded or dispatched in all the month of August. 

From Hawaii. — We have had two arrivals from Honolulu this week. 
The bark D. C. Murray had for cargo 5,875 pkgs. of Island Sugar. The 
steamship Zelandia, from same, had 7,276 pkgs. Sugar, 2,343 bags Paddy, 
991 bags Rice, 52 bags Coffee, and 78 bales Pulu. 

General Merchandise Marts. — Business for the most part is quite in- 
active in imports, particularly from the hands of rfgular importers. At 
the same time the general jobbing trade of the city, in nearly every de- 
partment, is fully up to the average of past seasons. Money is very plen- 
tiful, and the Savings Banks are steadily dropping their rates, and for 
large suuis 7 per cent only can be obtained, although 8 to 9 per cent, ax-e 
regular rates. 

Bags. — The demand for Burlap gra^n sacks is good. Sales for the week 
1,500,000, 22x36 standard, at ll@llic. cash, lli@Il.?c'. time. 

Boras. — Trade is slack, at old prices, say 5@5^c. for Concentrated, 
7^@Sc. for Refined. 

CoaL— Imports large. Sydney Steam has been sold at So 50@5 75. 
All other kinds in same proportion. 

Coffee. — Stocks large, and the market excessively dull at 18c. for prime 
Green's do\vn to 14@-16c. for inferior Pale. • 

Chemicals.— Stocks large, and the demand light. At auction 75 drums 
Caustic Soda sold in order at 4Jc., cash. 

Dry Goods. — The market at date is quite firm at full prices, with an 
upward tendency on all staple goods suited to the Fall trade, and this in 
sympathy with the market East. The New York rates exhibit a recent 
advance of 2^ ^ ct. 

Fish. — The market for Case Salmon is quite firm, at SI 30@1 35 for 
1-lb. Oregon, S2 50@2 55 for 2-lb. cans, and S2 6Q@2 05 ^^ dozen for 2^- 
Ib. tins. From present indications this year's catch of Salmon in tlie 
aggregate will equal that of last year. Up to this date we have received 
102,711 cases, but Oregon has and is shipping direct to Liverpool several 
cargoes of Salmon. 

French Goods. — The French bark Valentine, 145 days from Bor- 
deaux, is to hand with a full and well assorted cargo. Business in this 
line is slack. 



Metals. — The steamship Zealandia, from Sydney, is to hand, with 474 ' 
ingots Tin. Oregon is now sending us charcoal Pig Iron of very superior 
quality. The general market is dull, and prices of all sorts and kinds art; 
both low and nominal. 

Nails.— Imports as well as stocks large and free, and prices down to 
S2 S5@3 ^ keg. 

Oils. — The market for Coal or Kerosene in bbls. has dropped to 17@ 
18c. ; cases, 20@22Ac. A vessel is now loading fur Oregon with 5,000 ciisea, 
nearly one-half of which is .^aid to be California Earth Oil. California 
Castor, Sl@l 05, in cases ; do. Cocoanut, 50@55c. ; do. Linseed, 70@75c. 

Orchilla.— The ship St. David has sailed for Liverpool with 213,700 
lbs. in transit. 

Provisions —The market is firm. Bacon, ll@13c. ; Hams. 14@16c, 
for sugar-cured covered; Lard, 10^@lHc. ; Butter, choice, 23@25c. : 
Cheese, W(a'l2hc. 

Quicksilver —The City of Peking, sailing this day for Hongkong, will 
carry upwards of 1700 flasks, price 41@42c. The receipts for the past six 
months are 10,000 flasks less than for same time last year, and our ex- 
ports are 12,000 less. 

Rice. — The Zealandia from Honolulu brought the equal of 3,000 bags, 
price 7c. The general market e.xhibits strength which will no doubt cause 
an advance ejre long. We quote China, G^(d)7hv. 

Sugar. —Our spot stocks aggregate 20,000,000 lbs. The Zealandia and 
D. C. Murray, from Honolulu, made large addition.'^ to our stock. The 
demand for Refined is good for the season ; price, ll@llic. for White, 8 
@9c. for Yellows. Prices for the most part remain the same as for six 
months past. 

Teas. — On the 16th inst. S. L. Jones & Co. held an interesting auction 
sale of 3,000 pkgs. new crop Japans, of the importation of Macondray & 
Co., and of the celebrated brand of M & Co. The trade was well repre- 
sented, but the bidding was not very spirited. Pajjer Teas sold at 30c. 
for standard Greens; Gunpowder, 78@64c.; Souchong, 63@,67c. 

Tobacco. — The leading houses in the trade report considerable activity 
in choice brands of Virginia manufactured stocks, with large additions of 
fresh stock, now daily arriving by rail from the East. 

Wines. — The demand for all imports is very light; at the same time 
the export demand for Native is less urgent. This year's vintage will be 
large and good. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's stenniers will sail as Tollows at 12 St.: 
CITY OF PEKING, July 20th. for YOKOUAMA and HONGKONG. 

ALASKA, July 19th, tor PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at ACAPULCO, 
SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA, LA LIBERTAD and PUNTA ARENAS. Tickets to 
and from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rat«3. 

ZEALANDIA, August 5th, at 12 o'clock, M., or on arrival of the English mails, 
for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. $10 additional is charged for pas- 
sage in Upper Saloon. 

CITY OF PANAMA, July 20th, for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, 
and TACoMA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for PORT- 
LAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing, at 
Wharf Office. For freight or passage applv at the olfice, cor. First and Brannao sta. 

July 20. WILUAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents. 

OEEGOIT STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Direct Mail I^liie to Portland and Astoria. --Regralar Sleata- 
erstoPORTLA.^D, fn..ni San Francisco. Icavinj: EVERY FIVE DAYS from 
Folsom-street wharf.— New Iron Steamships GEORGE W. ELDER, CITY OF CHES- 
TER and OREGON, connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads 
and their connecting Sta^e Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho 
Territories, British Columbia and Alaska. Through Tickets at reduced rates to Ta- 
coraa, Seattle and all points in Washington Territory. Freight received daily. For 
passage or freight apply at the office of the company. No. 210 Battery street. 
Jane 22. K. VAN OTERENDUHP, Agent. 

SHORTEST, MOST DIBE'.T AND CONVENIENT LINE BETWEEN 
SONOMA AND SAN FEANCISCO. 

The uew and eleg'ant steamer <■ Sonoma,'* Captain Stofen, 
Commanding, will leave Sonoma Landing every MONDAY, WEDNESDAY and 
FRIDAY at 8 a.m. Returning, will leave Jackson -street wharf, San Francisco, 
every TUESDAY, THURSDAY and SATURDAY at 12:30 r.M. Passage, §1 50. For 
Freight apply ou board. May 4. 

FOR NEW YORK. 
Dispatch Xjine, from Vallejo-street Wharf. 

The Ai Celebrated Clipper Ship ^- Vouus America,*' Baker, 
Commander. — This splendid ship is well known, and ha^in^ large engage- 
ments, will receive Quick Dispatch. For balance of freight apply to 

GEORGE HOWES & CO., 302 California street. 
Consi^ees in New York : Messrs. Sutton & Co. June 29. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
for PORTLAND. (.)re-on), every 5 days, direct, and for LOS ANGELES, SANTA 
BARBARA, S.\NTA CRUZ, SA.N DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leanng SAH FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the Sau Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers. 

Ticket Office, Xo. 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKJNS & CO., Agents, 
March 10. No. 10 Market street. 

TT S. MAIL LINE FOR PORTLAND AND ASTORIA, OREGON. 

Cabin Passa$?e, «5 : Steerage, 82 ; Frci;;rht. gtl per Ton— 
The Oregon Steamship Couiimny will dispatch the new and splendid Al Iron 
Steamship OREGON, F, Connor, Commander, from Folsom-street wharf, on SAT- 
URDAY, July 13th, at 10 o'clock a.m. Tickets sold at the Company's office, 210 Bat- 
tery street; also at 214 Montgomery street. 
July 13. K. VAN OTEREN PORP. Agent . 

" PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

For Honolulu. To sail on or about July 13th. The Steam- 
ship WILiHNGTON, Fuller, Master, will sail as above. 
July 6. WILLIAMS. BLANCH.A.RD & CO., Agents. 

NOTICE TO PASSENGEES BY CITY OF PEKING. 
he snillug of the steamer is postponed till Saturday, the 

20th inst., at 12 noon. (.July 20.] WILLLAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agente. 



T 



July 20, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



15 



ART JOTTINQS 

There maybe some doubt iin to tlie propnetv of 1mvini*nn Art 
Ctallt-rv att K'lit'd t<> tlie iti)nii.il Kairt* li^hl Ity the Mt'(>hHnii.-H' Institute- iii 
tlii-f city, ii'»w that wo have an Art AtwiK-iatinii. whore all nu'ritnrioua 
workH by lucal artirit^ i.-aii rt-iulily tiiul ^pare, lu well im contributions from 
privato tvllfftious of forL-i^rn pictupfji, wl)o;$u ownen*, from n desire to en- 
cotiriiijo the ftiW(«ciution, ar« willing to hmn them for a neason. It isuivtMl 
tliat attractive picturu;! are not to ho hail in itntKcioncy to enable the Art 
AjWMH'iation to keen it* "liHin* open for any i-onsitlerablo part of the time. 
Kh'j>iint ^alleriea have Iwen leaaed and fitted with all the aucetwories 
needful for the projKT display of art. and then lie idle — practically so — 
for eleven months out itf the twelve in each year, and all for lack of pie- 
turejt to make and keep on the walls a creditable display, bo as to make 
them a constant attruvtion for well-to-do visitors from the interior, 
who ci>me to the city in large numbers the year round, especially in the 
Summer months. 

Twenty years ago, when the Mechanics* Institute held its first oxhi- 
bition, we had no Art Associati«»n, and a display of pictures at the Insti- 
tute buildiuL' was quite in keepinjr with the provincial character of art in 
this city. 'Ihe local artists — mostly portrait painters at that — could be 
told otf on the fin^^ers of the twct hands, but what was fit and appropriate 
at that (lay is so no li>ujs'er. The friends of art in this city have banded 
toLjether, in their thiiil attempt, to establish an art institute, and it de- 
m:uids the undivided etf<trt of all the artists and patrons of art to make it 
a success. Twice bef«)re has the movement succumbed to divided inter- 
vtits; and if for auy cause it is allowed to die again, many years will ]>ass 
away bef<>re it is again brought to life. The managers of the Mechanics' 
Kair laat year /armid out, to an Eastern picture-maker named Gale, the 
privilege of furnishing; the gallery with paintings, and right royally did he 
till the contract. The. r4iom w;i3 full to overflowing, and several gross were 
lying stored upon the floors, both above and below stairs. It is safe to 
sjiy that such a di.splay of the " queer" in art was never before seen in 
this city, and, judging from the outcome, the like of it will not be here 
again for some time tv come. 

.San I'rancisco was considered to be a most healthy goose, and the 
feathers to be plucked were thought sufficient for several nests; and, but 
for the unanimous vr>ice of the press, the matter would have gone well 
enough for the speculators. The alarm was given, however, and these 
choice specimens of factory art met with the appreciation such stuff 
deserves. 

It is proposed, this year, to make the art gallery at the Pavilion one 
of the chief attractions, and its management has been placed in the 
hands of Mr. Martin, the eflicient overseer of the Art Association gal- 
leries, and all the artists arc assiired that their ci>ntril)utions will be 
properly placed, and not hung under the shadow of an acre or so of com- 
mercial pictures. 

It was ;isserted last year that the local artists were invited to occupy 
the gallery with their pictures, and that the managers let the decorative 
contract to Gale after they had declined to exhibit. This is not so ; for it 
is well known that the arrangements were made with this art peddler 
st'viral moiiths l>efore the artists were advised that a fair was to be held at 
all. An artist, now visiting this city, was asked by Mr. Gale, in April. 
Inst yair, to consign one or more of his works, as he had the contract for 
sitpphjing the show, and was to receive the premium for best display. It 
will be remembered that Mr. Gale had a number of good pictures in his 
lot, which were designed as dummies, or stool-pigeons, to give character to 
the rest, and the works of this artist were solicited for that purpose, ofcourse. 
If they sold at the artist's price, well and good, and if not they served a 
good purpose in giving the others tone. It is now hoped that our artists 
and patrons of art will contribute liberally of their best pictures to this 
exhibition, so that in future the Institute, if it must exhibit art as well as 
mechanics, will have no occasion to unwittingly attempt to perpetrate a 
swindle upon the public as they did last year, and as they assuredly would 
have succeeded in doing, but for the timely and thorough expos^ the affair 
received at the hands of the press. 

The present prosperous condition of the Art Association is owing in 
great measure to the practical and energetic action of its President, Mr. 
Irving M. Scott, who is also at the head of the Mechanics Institute. Mr. 
Scott believes that the art gallery at the Pavilion is a matter of import- 
ance, and, in the interest of art, he is opposed to flooding this market \vith 
trash, in order to make a big display. He has no sympathy with the ac- 
tions of those in power last year, and througli his advice, as a sincere 
friend of art, the exhibit this year has been entrusted to the management 
of the Art Association, and it is hoped that no dog-in-the-manger policy 
will be manifest in the ranks of our local artists. Let all contribute of 
their best work, and use their influence to induce art collectors to loan 
their best pictures, to the end that a showing shall be made not only more 
meritorious but more attractive than any preceding one, and thus demon- 
strate the non -necessity of handing over the gallery to an itinerant picture 
hnvber. 

Art matters in general are as dull as usual at this season of the year. 
But few pictures are being put out, owing to the absence of art patrons in 
the country and at the Paris exhibition. A jjicture which attracts great 
attention just now is "The Honeymoon," by Sig. Vargas, a young Span- 
ish artist, just from Mexico. It represents a young wife in the act of 
taking a stitch in her husband's shirt front, and he in return is imparting 
a kias. The picture indicates the primitive style of handling wh^ch pre- 
vails in the art schools of our sister republics south. The name attached 
to the picture is all that saves it from the condemnation, in a moral point 
of view, uf the good people of San Francisco, and even the title is by 
many considered ton thin to conceal the utter abandon which lurks be- 
neath. The idea of a husband and wife thus saluting each other is quite 
beyond our comprehension, and so it is decided that the title is a misno- 
mer, and not to be considered — that the picture means bad and is bad. The 
filthy photographs of nude art with which many of the shop windows are 
filled are duly appreciated. The nude in art is artistic, but a young hus- 
band kissing his wife is wrong, very wrong. 

THE * * AUTOMATIC. " 

What makes the seamstress' toil but play, 

As silently, without delay, 
It shapes each tuck to fold away? "AUTOMATIC." 
What sews with speed, and runs so light 

O'er silken robes or fleecy white. 
And leaves no aching bones at night? ** AUTOMATIC." 
Office of "Automatic" Machine, 124 Post street. 



Cradle, Altar, and Tomb. 



CRADLE. 

Ar.Tsrnrt -In this rity. July 17th, to the wife or I.onpoJd Altschu!, a son. 

ri NMNnii \M 1m l!iir* rH> . .'liily 17th, to the wife of 'P. W, (;mlni^^'hanl. twins. 

I'lT.niii us- At so;i, .lune L'ntli. t" ttio wife of (_'apt.iiii W. !■', I>ilililmrii, u ilautfhtcr. 

KiiANhLi.N — In tlii,4 lity. July ir>tli, Ui the wife of .lowph Fnuikliii, a son. 

UuKKK In this city. July l^t''. t»> t'lc wife of M. (Jrueii, u liiuiKlitur. 

(IKORMMAYKR- -In this city, July lOtli, to tho wife of M. 11. (.IrnsHinaycr, a son. 

HruuRs— In Uiis city, -Inly l-ltli, to the wife of Wni. Hughes, a daughter. 

Jamkson-Iii tliis lily, July lOth, to the wife of H. Janieson, a son. 

Kixo— In this I'ilj'. July llth, to the wife of J. King, a dauglitor. 

LvoNs — In this uity. July l.'.tli, Ui the wify of K. 0. Lyons, a son. 

Soi/OHON— In iliis city, Juli' l(Jth, to tho wife of Isadorc Solomon, a daughter. 

ALTAR. 

Avkrill-Allfrbv— In this city, July 15th, J. L. Averill to Mrs. S. F. Allfrey. 
Bi.UMBNTnAL-BARiicil— Ir. thifi city, July — , B. Bluinoiithal to Johanna Barueh, 
Eikkukn'kottek-McNally— In this city, July llth. E. Kikerenkottcr to K. McNally. 
Jatiskx-Ash— In this city, July 10th, George M. Jiinsen to Katie M. Ash. 
Mack-Maulkr— In this city, July 6th, Jiicob Mack to Metii Mahler. 
Masdkl-Hiksciifelokr— In this city. July 14th, Eniaimcl Mandol to C. Hirschfelder. 
MrLCiiKV-Mi'LCUKV— In this city, July 10th, Matthew Mulchey to Mary Mulchey. 
MttiirnY-O'BiUKN— In this city, July 10th, P. J. Murphy to Annie M. F. O'Brien. 
Parker-Le Grand— In this city, July 15th, J. M. Parker to Miss C. A. Lo Grand. 
Urillv-Whrlin— In this city, July Hth, John J. Ucilfy to Mary Whelin. 
Sculoss-Coiirv—Im this city, July 14th, Ben. Schloss to Lizzie* Cohen. 
Sta-mpkr-Golpbrro— In this city, July 14th, Joseph W. Stamper to Frances Goldberg. 
SWAND-WiLLMAN— In this city, July ISth, Guorge E. Swand to Charlotte Willman. 

TOMB. 

CoAKLEY— In this city, July 10th, John Coakley, aged 47 years. 

Carroll— In this city, July 17th, Thomas H. Carroll, aged 1 year and 9 months. 

Hi'R.ST — In this city, July 10th. Patrick Hurst, aged 65 years. 

HoRTos— In thia city, July 14th. Pemberton B. Horton, aged 34 years. 

liYNXn —In this city, July 16th, Honom S. Lynch, aged 02 years. 

McUoMNBLL— Inthis city, July 15th, Willie H, McDonnell, aged 4 years. 

MimPUY— In this city. July 15th. John F. Mur))hy, aged 23 years and 11 months. 

Moxauan— In this city, July 14th. J. W. Monahan, aged 34 years. 

McAdams- In this city, July 14Lh. Donald McAdams, aged 311 years. 

McRpnv— In this city, July 17th, Mary Murphy, aged 43 years. 

Parker— In Alameda, July 17th. John Parker, aged 64 years. 

Rose- In this city, July 14th, Chris. Rose, aged 26 years. 

SiEBRixuT — In this city, July 10th, Louisa Sicbrecht, aged 41 years and 8 months. 

Scn.MiDT~In this city, July 17th, Alexander Schmidt, aged 41 years. 

TiTTEL— In this city, July 17th, Ernest Tittel, aged 24 years and 6 months. 

AVkbcott— In this city. July 17th, Ella B. Wcscott, aged IS years and 6 months. 

JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMTTNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 
TTIlie attention of Sportsmen is invited to the folloirinfc 

JL Ammunition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and P 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps ; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding ; Joyce's Gas-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Pin-fire and Central-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
aU gun-makers and dealei-s in gunpowder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Dec. 30. 57 Upper Thames street, London. 



ASHTON'S LIVERPOOL SALT. 

This celebratetl brand of Salt lias been in constant nse for 
more than half a century in the Eastern States, where for dairy purposes it 
commands double the price of any other brand of Liverpool Salt. The undersigned 
ure sole agents here, and offcritto the trade. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
Jan. 5. 213 Califoniia street. 

PURTHER REDUCTION. 
THE SEATTLE G O A Ii , 

CHEAPER TJXAJSr THJE CSJEAPEST. 

J^" Ask Your Dealer for it. 

[June 22.] 

SILVER KING KORTH MINING COMPANY, 

Pinal County, Arizona. 

Office: Room 36, No. 330 Pine St. (Academy Building), S. F. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE, ~~ 

NEVILLE & CO., 
113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 

San Francisco. [May 24. 

REMOVAL. 

Laver & Cnrlett, Architects, fnrnisb Plans, Specifications 
and Superintendence for the Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Houses, 
and every description of Building. Office : 19 S. F. Stock Exchange Building, Pine 
street, San Francisco. [Take the Elevator.] June 15. 

THOMAS DAT, 

Importer of every variety of Oas Fixtures, Crystal, Oilt, 
Steel and Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
Bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 and 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco^ ^ ^ Jan. 27. 

FRANK KENNEDY. 

Law Office, 604 Mcrcbant Street. --Probate, Divorce, Banh> 
ruptcy, and other cases attended to. llcnts, and all other demands, collected. 
Bad tenants ousted. Charge taken of real estate for residents, or absentees. Charges 
very reasonable. Jan. 12. 

NOTICE. 
Ijlor tlie very best pliotograptas go to Bradley & Rnlofson's, 



in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. 



S' 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 
o1<l by all Stationers. Sole Agrent for the Uuited States: 

MR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N, Y. Jan. 5. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Redaction in Price : Wholesale Price, 60 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price. CO cents per barrel, at the worlcs tit the SAN PKANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second St. Jan. 12. 

H. S, Crocker. H. S. CKOCKEE & CO., [Jou.s- D. Yost. 

Stationers and Printers, Xo.'s 401'40» Sansome street, Shu 
Francisco. March 9. 



16 



SAN" FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 20, 1878. 



■W^HERE ARE V7ICKED FOLKS BURIED? 

"Tell me, gray-haired sexton." I said. 

"Where in this field are the wicked folks laid? 
I have wandered the quiet old church-yard thro'. 
And studied the epitaphs of old and new ; 
But on monument, obelisk, pillar or stone 
I read of no evil that men have done." 
The old sexton stood by a grave newly made, 
With his hand on his chin, his hand on his spade ; 
I knew by the gleam of bis eloquent eye 
His heart was instructing his lips to reply. 

" Who is to judge when the soul takes its flight? 
Who is to judge 'twixt the wrong and the wright? 
Which of us mortals shall dare to say 
That our neighbor was wicked who died to-day? 

"In our jourrtey through life, the farther we speed, 
The better we learn that humanity's need 
Is Charity's spirit that prompts us to find 
Rather vii-tue than vice in the lives of our kind. 

"Therefore, good deeds we record on these stones ; 
The evil men do, let it lie with their bones. 
I have labored as sexton this many a year, 
But I never have buried a bad man here." 

— British Colonist. 

CYPRUS. 

The Anglo-Turkish Alliance is an accomplished fact. Henceforth, 
England is bound to defend the Asiatic possessions of the Sultan against 
the aggressions of the Czar. This means that England, at all hazards, 
will guard the road to her Indian Empire. As she was boxmd to do that 
anyhow, it was better that she should do it with the owner of the country 
as an ally than as a possible enemy. The Christian races being cut off 
from Turkey and given their independence, a homogenous Empire re- 
mains, to assail which there can be nodecent pretext. England guaran- 
tees the independence of that Empire, and the better to enable her to 
carry out her guarantee she acquires Cyprus, which she will doubtless 
turn into an impregnable fortress like unto Malta and Gibraltar. Cyprus 
lies within forty miles of the coast of Asia Minor, and occupies a com- 
manding position with regard to the Suez Canal. It also is important 
as a point from whence the proposed Euphrates Valley Railroad [Eng- 
land's future road to India] can be effectually protected. An account of 
a place that is about to cut so important a figure in European polities 
cannot fail to be interesting. One hundred and forty miles long byforty 
miles wide, its population is estimated at about 200,000, of whom two- 
thirds are Greeks, and the rest Moslems, Maronites, Armenians, Roman 
Catholics and Jews. It is intersected from E. to W. by a range of mount- 
ains, called Olympus by the ancients, whose principal peak, Oros Stavros, 
is 6,595 feet in hight. It often suffers from drought, its largest stream, 
the Pedia (the Pediaeus of the ancients), being sometimes entirely dry. 
The inhabitants must then depend mostly upon cisterns, as the wells are 
nearly all brackish. Aromatic herbs of all kinds grow spontaneously. 
Cotton, wine, tobacco, silk and fruits, all of fine quality, are produced. 
Several dyewoods and drugs also grow on the island. The minerals are 
numerous, including the precious metals and copper, and many precious 
atones, but the mines are neglected. The wines of Cyprus, especially 
from the vineyard called the Commanderia, from having belonged to the 
knights of Malta, enjoyed great celebrity in former times, and the pro- 
duction exceeded 2,000,000 gallons, but has now dwindled down to less 
than 200,000. Two common qualities of Cyprus wiues, black and red, 
with a strong taste of tar. from being kept in tarred casks, are exported 
to Egypt, but never to Europe. Larnaka, where the European consuls 
and the i)rincipal foreign merchants reside, and Liraasol (anc. Amathus), 
are the chief commercial emporiums of the island. Eamagusta (on the 
site of ancient ArsinoiJ}, so famous under the Venetians, possesses an ex- 
cellent spacious port, sheltered from all winds, which could easily be 
deepened to accommodate hundreds of large slips; but at piesent it is 
so choked up with filth that it can only hold about a dozen small craft. 
Locusts commit great ravages in the island, but in spite of this evil, and 
of the abuses in assessing and collecting the taxes, the prosperity of 
Cyprus is on the whole increasing. Many of the oppressions have been 
removed ; the peasants are freely permitted to sell their produce, and ag- 
ricultural employment is abundant. The wheat and oats are inferior, 
and the annual grain crop is small. Colocynth is extensively cultivated. 
The cotton crop in 1857 amounted to about 2,700 bales. During the 
American civil war it reached over 8,000 bales, but has since fallen off. 
Madder root forms a principal production, the greater part being ex- 
ported to France, and the rest retained for home consumption. The ab- 
olition in 1835 of the monopoly on carob beans {ccratonia siliqim) rapidly 
increased their production. In 1852, tfae exports of carobs amounted to 
1,350 tons, and in 1857 cargoes were for the first time exported to Eng- 
land. In 1864, the exports of them amounted to 7,087 tons, valued at 
about §175,000, and they have since increased. British and American 
m mufactiires are imported from Syria, Smyrna and Constantinople ; 
hirles, coffee, sugar, cloth, fowling pieces, tine powder, small shot, salt 
tia'i, and Swedish iron, from France ; ghtss, steel, German iron, nails, pa- 
per, etc., from Trieste and other Austrian ports. The island forms a part 
of the vilayet of the islands of the Mediterranean (Jezaii'i Bahri Setid). 
C i-pital, Nicosia (Turk. Lefkosha). The archbishop of Cyprus resides at 
Nicosia, but his title is Tuetropolitan of Constautia (Famagusta). By the 
CO mcil of Ephesus, in 431, his independence of any patriarch was de- 
cl Lred, and he still retains it. Thus the Church of Cyprus, which has, 
be tides the metropolitan, five suffragan bishoprics, is considered one of 
the independent groups into which the Greek Church is divided. For 
the Catholics of the Latin communion, who do not excead 1,000, there is 
a bishop at Faraagusta ; and there is also a Maronite bishopric of Cyprus. 
The island of Cyprus occupies a distinguished place both in sacred and 
pro'ane history. It early belonged to the Phcenicians of the neighboring 
C)a9t. It was afterward colonized by the Greeks, who founded there 
seve.al independent kingdoms, and passed successively under the power 
of 1 1-^ Pharaohs, Persians, Ptolemies and Romans, excepting a short 
period nf independence under Evagnras, in the 4th century B.C. It was 
one of th^ chief seat-s of the worship of Veuu.s, hence called Cypria. 
Salamis, Citium (whence the Biblical name of the island, Kittim), "Ama- 
thus, Pa.ihus, Soli, etc., were the most remarkable ancient cities. At the 



time of the crusades it was detached from the Greek Empire, and made a 
kingdom for Guy of Lusignan. From his descendants it fell to the Ven- 
etians, and in 1570-71 was subdued by the Turks after a brave defence. 
From 1832 to 1840 it was governed by the viceroy of Egypt. Recently, 
the interest of the public in the history and antiquities of Cyprus has 
been excited by the discoveries made by General Cesnola, the American 
consul at that island. The decipherment of the Cypriote inscrijjtions 
was attempted by De Luynes and Ruth on a supposed identification of 
the words Salamis and Amathus. The recent discovery by Lang of a bi- 
lingual inscription in Phceuician and Cypriote proved it to be a wrong 
basis. The labors of Hesychius, Birch, George Smith, and of Brandis, 
whose discoveries were published in 1873 bv Curtius, have shown that the 
language of the Cypriote inscriptions is a Greek dialect, approaching the 
Arcadian, but possessing many peculiarities. The writing, which is not 
Greek, but of unknown origin, is usually from right to left and syllabic. 
Some of the characters represent, however, different forma of the vowels, 
and others consonants only. 

ENGLISH BICYCLES. 

G. L.CITNNENGHAM, 
206 Sansome street, San Francisco, 

Is now prepared to fill orders for Duplex Ex- 
celsior, Stanley, Club, Gentleman's, Challenge, 
Premier, and all other makes of English liiuycleg. 

Price, from £60 to 9160, 
according to quality of material and size of 
machine. G. L. CUNNINGHAM. 

Importer of English Bicycles, 
206 Sansome st., office of Macondray & Co., 
Juue 22. San Fridcisco, California. 

Stock Brokers. 

William E. Hale.] HALE & PACHECO, [Romvaldo PAcnEco. 

Commission Stock Brokers, 317 JUoiitg'Omery street (Nevada 
Jilock). Stocks carried on margin and liberal advances on active accounts. 
iJune 22.1 




K. S. Latham.] LATHAM & KING, [HoMEn S. Kino. 

Successors to James H. I>atbam <1' Co., Xo. 313 Piue street. 
Stock and Money Brokers. Stocks bought and carried on margins. July 13. 

Daniel Z. Yost.] [J. W. ERECiiisRiDQE, Member S. F. Board. 

BEECKINRIDGE & YOST, 
Stock Brokers, 30-1 Sloiitg: ornery St. [Mareh 16. 

SuERWooD Callaquan.] [Jeremiac Lykch. 

CALIAGHAN. LYNCH & CO., 

Stock Brokers, No. 509 California Street, San £'rancisco. 

[April 27.1 

Geo. C. Hickox. E. C. McFAaLA^1{. 

GEO. C. HICKOX & CO., 

t Commission Stock Brokers (San Francisco Stock Ex:- 
/ ehaage, No. 230 Montgomery street, San Francisco. May 4. 

Alexakdbr Austin. 



J. M. WALKEa. 



S' 



tock Brokers, 

streets, San Fraucisco, 



Jennisqs S. Cox. 
J. M. WALKER & CO., 
Nortbwest corner Montgomery antl Pino 



March 30. 



S' 



E. BOSWELL.] 

tock Brokers, 

California 



B. BOSWELL & CO , E^- C. Bates. 

. 31S California street, San Francisco, 

March 30. 



Newton Booth, 0. T. Wbeeler, Sacramento. 1 J. T. Glover, W. W. Dodge, S. F 
W. W. DODGE & CO., 

Wliolesale Orocers, corner Front and Clay streets, Sau 
Francisco. April 1. 



S' 



TABER, HARKER & CO., 
nccessors to Phillips, Taber A' Co., Importers and ^Miolesale Gro- 
cers, 108 and 110 California street, hclow Front, San Francisco. April 15. 



CASTLE BR0THERS,--[E8f.ablished, 1850.] 

Importers of Teas aud East India Ooods, Nos.213 and 215 
Front street, Sau Francisco. Jan. 13. 



BaaxjcE, 



esr PRINTS 'sii 

537 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

BELOW MONTGOMEliy. 



NOBLE & GALLAGHER, 

Importers anil Dealers In Painters^ JUaterials, Honse, Si^n 
and I^esi;ij Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glazierti, No. 438 
Jackson street, between Montj,'omery and Sausomo, Sau Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomined aud Colored. Jubbing promptly attended to. ilay 13. 



F 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 
iiiest and Cheapest Meat-flavoring Stock for Sonps, Illade 

Dishes and Sauces. March 2. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT 

[sa snccess and boon for ivliich Nations should feel g^rate- 
i'ul. See " Medical Press," " Lancet," " iJritish Medical Journal," etc. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

('^antion—Crennine only witb fac-siniile of Baron Iiiebig:*s 
J Si;5nature, in blue ink, across Label. " Consuniptioa in England iucreased teu- " 
foldin ten jears." March 2. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

To be had of all Store-keepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale oul.vj, C. David & Co., 43, Mark Lane, 
London, England. March 2. 



July 20, 1878. 



CALIFOUNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



OUR EXTRACTOR. 
XVom City and Country Press. 



We learn from llu* S'tlt Lukr IhmM ilia( Cjiptiiu 
dl-u'vtTtii a jiliiii t\v wtiu'h iiitiivi- !iiil|»luir'> innv hf tv\ 
tort^or \MiU-r. ItcV^ninir- tImC with one uf ltl!<'tiiriitt< 



iMVfll, or Ihiil plncf, hue 
III "itlimii lufl. irmi rc- 
f rotniiioii frone, costlns; 
not uviT two hutidn-il dollari*. \\v run work four liiiii(lr»-<i ton« piT inonlh.^— Four 
0"iuT8 of till' Xi-vHtta .Mlniiij: I'oniivuiy, tit Nvw York Fliii, Yiiha County, arrivi'ti 
at Murvttvilti) on Monday with otumc j:i:i.tfn) in f;oId diii'l, llio rcfiilt of wufliin;: 
oulftnco NovonibiT— ^nowi'i />f//io»T(i/.— liojriinHn:.' Hie crop prospccla of tliiit 
county, tliu San It'uijo AVir* cnys: "Itiniiyhc timt tlio rnst hiis nol been co dc- 
slrmnivi' Ui llio whcMt crop in llu> mountafii dfslrlctc of tin.' Valli' dt' I.O!< VidiiH. 
Ilu' (.uyiiniacii or .JuMnn, hul stUl It tint* dnnniew! it niiHi-rialty. The lioney vifkl 
if ixpfcu-d 10 I)f yootl, but llio crop will tn* Ijiti--— Ki-poiis from Oregon indicate 
a more bopi-lul vlt-w ol the yraiii prosp-ctft. In nnuiy placet? Hit" Itiiluroof the 
crops lp only purtliil, iind fn»m the I'iipiT rohinihia tlnTi- ie i'Si)ccltKl as lar™L' a 
Bitrplui* ns lust yi-ar.— .Sac/'<i//j<'H/t> />((.— Tin- j,'raiu of I'lnci-r cuiiiity is li^fhtund 
fuiil.iind the crop win be li-cn by onc-Imlf tliuu Uml of 1877.— iVacYr //«^/-(i/(/.— 
'\'\iv MurynUU A)>}>fiU eays tbut ihv wbcni crop of the Stnie Ibis year will not bo 
oiu--biill lltui of lti77.-^Tlif Souomu Vulloy Narrow Otiii<,'f iljillroad lias been tii- 
corporalrtl. Tho road Is lo t-stcnd IVom iIk- nioiiib of Volay Cn-yk, on San Pablo 
Day, throii:;Ii Norlolk to Sonoma. The c;ipltJiI stock is two hundred thousand dol- 
larp. — //((//'W.»/ry /■';</fr/;ri*<'.— The ;:niln crop of Kern county is et^tiniated at 
double thai of any former year — AVm (>jf/mr.— Some f,'ood crops of potatoes 
have been raised this year on Ihe plains about Sumner. There has been no irriqu- 
!M>ii in that section whatever, and there are no lacllitic!* for irrlj.'ution.— 7i..^— 
The oningo cnip of Los Anfjelcd connty has incrcajicd from about five million in 
l.s71-7i to nearly et-:ht million in K<rT-7S.— -6o# Anndtif iS/ar.—— Wheat is being 
ret eived at the wniehoufes in this place. It is yielaint; much belter than was »n- 
tltHMied. ThethrePhcrs are all busily at work.ntidwc hear complaints about a 
searci:y of iheni in Yolo county.-- 3 Wo J/di;.^— The Orange correspondent of iho 
Aiuiheim Gazette wriU-s: Barley will hardly averaf;e live ancka lo the acre. There 
w ill be lesi* than half a croj) of wheat, but rye will prove a remunerative crop. 
The cut and wire worms have entirely di-'appearerl. and Ihe corn fields arc lookin" 
splendidly.— The Secretary of the Reliel Canal Commii^sion bn^ news from the 
surveyors in the iield that the advance party will soon reach DaviBville. The sur- 
vey is pro-iressin^ saiisCaclority, and the eujjineers have formed a favorable opin- 
ion as to Ihi- feosibiliiy of the scheme. The lall will be ample.— FoZ/iyo Chronicle. 
^— The yield of -iniin the pn-scnt season it; jroing to be enormous in this county. 
Slany of the ftelds, especially through what may be termed the central part of the 
eormiy, arc still aurpassini; the expectations of the owners.— iS/a/ii*/aH« ^^ew6^.^-^ 
The owner of the Adelma mine hud a crushina of rock at theEiimorc from their 
new mine, located near the Poorman. The uverago yield was $125 to the ion.— 
lita/io Aj^atanche.^— The Potosi mine i:? lookiufj first-cla^s. Dillingpr & Upbam 
are workini: upon a promising lode in the vicinity of Florida aiountJiin, and all 
the mines which are being operated in that vicinity are yielding well,— 76.-^The 
Lotrrr Lake liiilkdn states that there if j; 10.000 in tile couniy treasury.-— The 
Pliocene mine met with a break-down last week. The shaft is. in consequence, 
mird to within sixty feet or so of the top. The water increases rapidly as they 
go down.— J/oun/«in Messenger. ■^^Thc fruit crop of Carson Valley will he excep- 
tionally abundant this year. The orchards are burdened with fruit so far advanced 
a? lo preclude the possibility of its' being destroyed by irost. -Sitcramento Union- 
—The old Napa Court-house was eold at auction, ibe other da v, for *4Q0.— 
y<.i})a Retfhltr.—The mining di.-'irict of Silverado is now attracting considerable 
atteiiiion.- Anu/uim Gazettc.-^^ll is rumored that an clTort will shortly be made 
to remove the county scat to Soulsbyville.- ywoi^uw/zis Independefit.^— The crops 
around Alu'criue are satisfactory, and threshing will proliably commence next week 

—j/j The Middlctou correspondent of the Lake Connty Bee says; Farmers are 

heading, and fome are going to thresh next week.^— U is now generally conceded 
that the railroad ferry crossing will lake place from the foot of First street, ofT the 
Island, thence to what is known as BnU's Valley.— Co;(im Costa News —The 
Alden fruit dryer was started up last Wednesday, and set to work on the first in- 
stallment of applee for the 3eason.—.-lm(irf(37'Z'i67;a;c/i.'^Thc Amador Lumber 
Company commenced operations this week, after a suspension of several weetce 
on account of not being able to get logs through the canal to the mil'. Jl ' 
Gage's chlorination works arc running on full time with good results,— TJ.—^The 
Mirced Express says that the hay crop ollbat connty will fall short of the crop of 
ISTti, as all the grain has matured, and none will be cut for hay as in former years. 
^—According to Ihe liivvrside Press^ Captain Sayward is about to set to work on 
developing the Temescal tin minee. As nearly two million dollars" woith of tin 
is imported yearly into the United States, there is ample field for home production, 
^— The Los Anoeles Uerald says; If we ever develop an aptitude for manufactures 
the crude materials, with the exception of coal, are at hand. We have petroleum' 
in great quantities in Los Angeles county, and coal should not be far off, -^ We 
nnderetjind that, owing to the damp and foggy weather, the iraisin crop at Rivers- 
dale will not be m large as m former years.— ^aa Bernardino Times.— —There is 
somela'kof erecting a large sanitarium in our valley shortly . An Eastern gentle- 
man of capital and enterprise had the matter in band,— ^^..^Farmcrs tell us that 
the wheal crop is turning out better than they expected, and freer from rust than 
appearance indicated.— trin^«** Advocate.^— The damage to the wheat crop of 
Los Adgeles is not so grwU as was recently expected. The profits from the orange 

and corn crop will be above the average.— <S'a« Jose Herald. The Southside 

Railroad extension has been completed as far as the Los Gatos bridge, and about 
the end of next week it will be completed to the narrow gauge depot.— id.— Feed 
is plentiful on the Buena Vista Jloiiutains and on the Chnpinos Creek and tributa- 
ries. There will be considerable mact in that section, also, this fall.-^ft^iHO,? City 
Judex.-— A correspondent of the Stockton Independent reports that Staten Island 
is a picture of desolation.^— The Fetatuma Courier says the demand for iiirm 
hands has never been better here than during this season. 



The Paris " Figaro " tells an amusing story from Berlin anent the 
Congress, and angm-s from it the success of its deliberations. It appears 
that Prince Bismarck gave a State dinner to the Plenipotentiaries. His 
Highness has the reputation of being what they call here a bon vivcur. 
At dessert tlie Marquis of Salisbury suddenly remarked to the Prince: 
"Your Highness ^vill suffer from indigestion ; you have juyt swallowed a 
cherry-stone." "My Lord." replied the Prince, somewhat hauglitily, 
*'you are mistaken." The blue blood of the Cecils mounted to the brow 
of the Lord of Hatfield at this apparently flat contradiction of the Im- 
perial Chancellor, and the guests began to look aghast, when the Earl of 
Beaconsfield interposed with that siiaviter in modo which the noble Earl 
knows so well how to employ. " Permit me," said his Lordship ; '■ you 
may both be right and both wrong." Addressing the Priuce, he said: 
" Your Highness is far too g-reat a man to take notice whether you swal- 
lowed one very, very small cherry-stone." "Two," insisted Lord Salis- 
bury. "Or two," gently added Lord Beaconslield ; and my noble col- 
league is too far-seeing a man to be mistaken in his eye-sight. Will your 
Highness permit me to be the arbitrator on the spot V " With pleasure," 
said the Prince. "Will you pass me your plate?" said Lord Beacons- 
field. The plate was placed before his Lordship by a gorgeously attired 
lackey, and, amidst the profound silence of the courtly assembly, the 
Prime Minister of England upset the debris of the Prince's dessert on 
the table-cloth, and commenced arranging the cherry-stones in rows ; and 
against each cherry-stone his Lordship placed a stalk, and then deliber- 
ately commenced counting the stalks— one, two, three, and so on, up to 
fifty-seven. A silence that was absolutely painful reigned as his Lord- 
ship commenced counting the stones— one, two, three, and so on, up to 



fiftv-fivo, and tliore stopped. "Your Highness," said Lord Benconsfiold, 
" there are two stones missing." 'J'he Prince roue, and, in a voice trem- 
blinj; with emotion, said to Lord Salihbut-y, " My Lord, you are riglit;" 
and tlieii, approaching Lord Beuconrtfiehl, threw himself upon his neck, 
exclaiming, "My Lord, you are the moat wonderful mau in Europe!" — 
London Sportinij I'iuivs, 




THE COVENTRY MA'JHINISTS' CO., 

Coventry. Eng-land. 
Mannfavt itrvrn of the Ct-tt-bratvil Mod- 

vfii liivycleti : 
'* Coventry llncer," 

**Geutleinaii*M Itoailntor/* 

niKl '* Club Bicycle,** 
Justly Ucnottmcd for their Durability, Elegance, 
Lightness and Siieed. 

A. KONEKE & CO., Agents, 
July 0. 525 Front street. 



IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS 

Of liEA A PKRRINS^ SAi:<X, wlilch are calculatctl to <le- 
ceive the public, LKA AN1> Vfr^KRINS have adopted A NEW LAIJEL 
BEARING TUEIK SIGNATUHl:;, LEA & I'EUKINS, which is placed on every bottle 
of WORCESTEltSlIlRE SAUCE, and without which none isgenuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS' Sivuee, and see name on \\Tapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per. Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Woreestcr ; Crosse & Blackwell, 
London, etc., etc., and by grocers andoihnen tliroughouttbc world. To be obtained of 
Dec. 1. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., San Francisco. 

F. C. Snow.] SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. [W. B. May. 

SNOTV A MAY, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Flctarea, Frnnies, Moldiugs, an<l Artists' Blatcrials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 



w. Morris. 



J. F. Kennisdy. 



Jos. ScnwAB. 
MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO., 

Importers and I>ealers lii Molcliugs, Frames, i:ii^raviug:s, 
Chromos, Litbog:raphs, Dccaleonianie, Wax and Ai'tista' Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 

THOMAS BOYSON. M.D., 
(University of Copenhagren, Denmark), 

Physician aud Surg:eon. Olticc, 112 Kearuy street. Office 
Hours, 11 A.M. to 1 r.M., and 6 to 8 r.M. Sunday, II to 1 only, Telephone in 
the ollice. July 13. 

DR. HALPRUNER, Surgeon Chiropodist, 

Cures Corns, Bnuioiis, Ingrrowiug Nails, etc. "No pay re- 
quired until cured. And without pain or lameness. Examination and Con- 
sultation Free. Mrs. H. will assist treating ladies. Office Hours: From 1 r.M. to 
(J P.M., and 7 to p.m. ; Sunday, 11 to 1 p.m. ST JAMES HOUSE, 

March 23. 906 Market street, corner Ellis and Stockton. 

CHARLES E. HOLBROOK, M.D., 
Of&ce and Residence: St. James Houec, 906 Market Street. 

[March 23.] 

DR. D. A. KILLER'S 
omeopathlc Free Dispensary to the Poor, Xo. IS Barley 

Place, off O'Farrell street, next Hammam Baths. Feb. 16. 



H 



TO DENTISTS, PHYSICIANS AND ARTISTS. 

Offices to ReBt.—Tliose desirable front rooms on first floor 
NUCLEUS HuUSE, facing Market, Third and Kearny streets. Apply to 
June 8. MRS. E. R. WORTH. 

HARTSHORN & McPHUN, 

Mannfaetnrers of all hinds of Window Shades, Dealers iu 
Carpets, Oil Cloths, Coniiues, Window Lace, etc., 112 Fourth street, near Mis- 
sion. Factory : Corner Bluxonie and Fifth streets. April 13. 

FOR SALE, 

Completely furnished, one of the most attractive places In 
MENLO PARK. Finely laid out, with every variety of Fruit aud Ornamental 
Trees, and but five minutes walk from the station. Fine House, Stable and Out- 
buildings. Must be seen to be appreciated. Apply to 
April 6. THOMAS DAY, 122 Sutter street. 



Gboror Ho^\'E9,] 



GEORGE HOWES & CO.. 



[Jabkz Howfs. 



San Francisco, California, Shipping- and Commission 9Ier< 
chants, and agents of Sutton & Co.'s 



New York and Philadelphia. 



D. F. HUTCHINQS. 



Dispatch " Line of Clipper Ships from 
May 11. 



J. Sandeiison. 



M. DtJNNB. 

PHCENIX OIL WORKS. 

Established 1850.— Untcbings & Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

George ScnuLTz.] SCHULTZ & VOM BARGEN, [Henry Von Barobn. 

Importers and Dealers in Wines, Brandies, Bonrbon Whis- 
kies, and all kinds of Foreign and Domestic Liquors, southeast corner Cabfornia 
and Front streets, San Francisco. April 13. 

J. C. MERRILL & CO., 

Shipping: aud Commission WCerchants, Agents for the Sand- 
wich Islands Packet Lines, 204 California street, S. F. April 13. 

L.H.Newton.] NEWTON BBOTHERS & CO., [Morris Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers In Teas, Foreig^n Goods snd 
Groceries, 204 and 206 California street, San Franeisco, Cal. May 25. 

aUICKSILVER. 
lorsale— Inlotstosnit,by Thomas Bell, Xo. 305 Sausome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 10. 



F 



F 



GOOD BOYS 
or any service may be Uail without charges at the "Fouth's 

Free DiiecUiry, 1417 IlowarJ stieel. [May U.J A. P. DIKTZ, Aauiit. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LtlTER AND 



July 20, 1878. 



REAIi ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Keeorded in the City and County of San Francisco. California, for the 
two Weeks ending July 17, 1878. 

CompUedfrom the Hcciyrds of the Mercantile Agency of John McKillop db Co. , 
401 Cal'fomia Street, San Francisco. 



Wednesday, July 3d. 



OBANTOB AND GRANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



JnoD Turner to Ann D Turner... 
S Landers to Rosanna McConrt... 
Sav and Ln Soc to H Fitzparrick.. 
TlioB Mclnerney to Jami's Woods 

Wm HoUis to Moritz Stiiber 

City and Co to Thos Pcndurgast . . 
Peter Moran to Thoa Mcltierny. . . 
M L Citron to Sarah Harris 



|E Dmnioud, 273 9 17tb. 8 24x125 

NHJth, 110 e Guerrero, e3l):lf>xI00 

N 3()lh, 105 w Church, w 50slI4 

Lots, bik 2tl, WeetEod Map No 1 

E Leavenworth, 6(1:6 8 Clay, 8 30x100 

Sw Alabama and 22d. sfiSxKO 

Lots 150, 151, Academy Tract 

Lots 7, 3, bIk 50; lot 9, blk 53, Paul Tret 
Homestead 



Same to Same Lot 2, blk 54; lot 8. blk 23, Panl Tret Hd 

JnoSiiiveiy to Pioneer WoolnFaclWater lot property below high water 

I mark w of Larkin st rcet 

Lone MtnCemtytoWG Badger.. Lot 157— se St Rose Hill av and Myrtle 

1 Path 



Gift 

3.400 

7W 

650 

4.200 

'218 



50l3 
2^ 



Friday, July 5th. 



L Moletimo to Carolina Molctimo. 



W Browning to Benjamin Simon., 
Robt Wisnora to Martin Whelin ,, 

D C Driscoll lo Edw'd O'Day 

S H Carlisle to Chas H Killi-y 



VV Natoma, 240 n 15th, d 25sS0; b Valle- 
jo, 124:2 e Dupout, e 1-3:4x34; and n 
Hinckley, 50 w Pinkley pi, w 2Cs26... 

Nw Larkin and Geary, n 60x80 

Ne Noe and Hancock, n 51:6x105 

IE Clinrch, 104 n 22d. n 2U,xia5 

JNw Pierce and Broadway, n 275x412:6.. 



Gift 
15.000 
1,075 
1.600 
30.000 



Saturday, July 6th. 



Herman Blum to Henry Epstein., jUnd 3^ of party wall het Nos 512, 514 

Bush street 

B W Connolly toM A Uarrincton.jW Guerrero, 110 s 17tb. 8 50xS0 

WE Chamberlain, Jr to I F EaloolNCalifornia, 78:3 w Webster, \v26x82:7?b 

Abel P Scott toNiclioIasGKittle. Lot7. blk6. Flint Tract Hd Assn 

Henry Habn to Wm M LeveronclSw Railroad and I4th aves, nw 85, sw 30 

I se 100, ne 40 (o beginning 

College Hd Assn to John Smitb.lLots 14, 15, 17, blk 8, in said Homestead 



I 80 

2 

l.-^OO 

450 

2,200 
900 



Monday, July 8th. 



Isabella McCreery to A McCreery. 
Wm J Lowry to Isabella Lowry . . 
L Quint to WH Datrymple 

W H Dalrymple to Peter Alferllz. 
Chas G Cooke to Ann Cooke 



Nw Eddy and Franklin, n 120x137:6.. 

Nw2Ist and Guerrero, n 100x92:6 

Lots -264, 265, 266, Gift Map 1. w Dotor- 

ct>, 114 B Grove, s 50x8 25 

Same 

E Mary pi, 68:9 9 California, s 20x60; e 

Mission, 170 B 14th, 8 30x80 



$ 5 

Gift 



700 
1.00 



Tuesday, July 9th. 



United Ld Absr to C W Daden. ..IE Howard, 100 n ISth. n 75x122:6 

n Eastman lo Lafayette Story S Clay, 53:4 e Taylor, e 106:3. s 115, w SO 

I n :i in, w 80, n 22:0, n 93 to bes 

iSe Natoma, 175 ne 11th. ne 25x75 

W Fillmore, 106:8X n California, n 53 x 

106:3, ; 

W Steiner, 82:6 n Oak,n ^xllO 

W ISth av, 195 s L St, B 105x249 

N Wayland and se La Grande, ne 110:4. 
e 95:6, w 67 to be^■, and sw Dwiirht 
and Madison, w 240, 8 4:10, se 2(i9;6, nl 

127:8 to beginning 

S Hayes, 110 w Buchanan, w 27:6x120.. | 



Eben Swett trt" H W Bowman 

Same and wife to W J Bowman... 

Lawrence McNally to A Hawkins. 

A K Hawkins to L McNally 

Same to Same 



W Yosbnrgh to Jae Conlin . 



$1,300 

10 
4,000 

10,000 
6,000 

750 



1,5000 
2,G00U 



Wednesday, July 10th. 



Jacob S Kline to J Barman 

H F \V Hoffman to E S Lynch 

Amelia W Smiley to Wm S Lyoa*. 

F G Henston to A W Smiley 

Anton jienier to Ei.eene Moffatt.. 

Frank Cunningham to C J Collins 
S P Middleton to Fred U Woods, 
Adolphe Leveque to Chas Brown. 



Same to Same 

Eugene Moffat to Jno T Welby... 

Henry Moffat to City and Connty. 



Mary E Boles to F N Woods 

Jno Dousherty to Daniel Cook... 
W S Lyon to W Fohlmeier 



W Dnpont, 57:6n Green, n 20x57:6.. 
W Castro, 137:6 n 20th, n 27:6x250... 
Nw Augusta and Utah, n 100x100.... 

Same 

Lots 1309. 1182, 1183, 1210 to 1314, Gift 

Map No 4 

Lot 18, blk 306, O'Neill and Haley Tret. 

NwFell and Steiner, w 110x55 

Lots 590, 592, 594, 596, 59S, 600, Gilt Map 

Nol 

Lot 602, Gift Map No 1 

Part lots 105, 1196, 122.'i, 1226, Gift Map 

No4 

Lots 1197, 1227, and part lots 1195, 1196, 

1125,1226, 1228, same 

Nw Fell and Steiner, n 55x110 

Sw Pine and Jones, s 22:llx.'i9:9 

Nw Angus tJi and Utah, n 10*)xlOO 



$ 200 
1.250 



740 

200 

3,500 

1,300 
5 



12.000 
775 



Thursday, July 11th. 



Alexr Brown to Henry H Meeker. 

Eugene D Sabla to MichI Hession 
S P Middleton to Mary Howe ... 
Geo Vagtsand wf to Frank Alvord 

Michl Casey to Emilia L Scbacht. 

Thos Freeman to Richard Gould. 
Emanuel Steiner to Jno F Bauer. 

Same to John Heira 

D A McDonald to J B Brandon.. 



Patk Tobin to Oath McGee , 

Rudolphe Kosche to A W Scott.. 

H L Byrne to W Merkelbnck 

Jno M Byrne to Henry L Byrne.. 
Wm Ilollia to O V Puimlexter..., 
Jno Feehan to Mary A Feehan... 



Jno Pilling to City and County.. 
J I Borneroan to IJarbura Yui 
A O Diggius to J Diggine.. 



Elizth Stanwood top B Q,umlan..|W Van Ness, 60n Bush, n 60x100 $ 1 

Peter L Webb to Same Same 11,212 

F J C Lavillan to Puter L Webb... Same; and s Bush, 192:6 e Gougb, e42:3 

1 Xl20.; 

E Webster, 25:6 n Washington, n 25:6 x 

S;» 

W Polk, 47:6 s Broadway, s 21x100 

Lot 9, blk 515. Buy Vie«' Homestead... 
Pacific, 183:6 e Leavenworth, e 23 x 

137:6 

W California av. 100 n Powell av, w 150 

n to a pt, e 133, s 30 to beginning 

W Baldwin court, 200 n Folsom, n 15x40 
Lots 9, 10, blk .354, Hunter Tel in S S F, 

>3' of lot 11, b'.k 354, same 

S Washington. 142:6'w Devisadero, w 25 

xl.37:6 

E Columbia pi, 125 n Prospect av, e 

28 

No Union and Jones, e 20x77 

N Oak, 224:4 w Van Ncea, w 52:11x120.. 

Same 

W JoneP, 61:3 s Clay, s 37:6x130 

Nw Naloma and Ist, w 50x38; and sun- 
dry Inis in different parts of the city.. 

Streets in Western Addition 

fer. . . Ne Douglas and ISlh , e 35x75 

Is Busb. 209:3 w Devisadero, w 103:3 x 

I 137:6 



2,700 

2,81 10 
150 

4,000 

400 
700 

1,800 
600 

3,000 

350 

5 

5,100 

Gift 

9,690 

Gift 

1 

500 



Friday, July 12th. 



C Clayton to Jno J Havnef 

W H Blakely to Thos Mcllridc. . . . 
ED Wbeelerio Richard Gould.... 



Henry D Brnns to H E Brnns 

Jo^ G Mysel (oCKohJcke 

Peter Schwerdt toM Schwerdt 

Pradk M Stockings tn C H Killey. 
Earl Bartiett to Eliza D Bartlett. . . 



Minnie Borgstrom to A Hinz et al. 

J M Mobs to Silver Terrace Hd Aa 

Jos Brandenstcin to Benai Berith.. 
Jos Smith to Mary Smith 

Same to Same 



Lot 11, blk 5, Flint Tract Hd Assn 

Nw Silver, 300 ne 3a. ne 125x70. 

W Baldwin court, 200 nw Fillmore, nw 

15x40 

Nw Greenwich and Pierce, w ;}5xl00... 

Lots 499. 4%, 500, Gift Map No J 

Se Market, 250 sw 5tb, sw 25x100 

N Broadway, 127:6 w Octavia. w 100x100 
Sw Point Lobos and 151h ava, a 175:.5, w 

91, n 113i deg, w to a pt, c 117 lo beg. 
Assigns all pr'perty for benefitof crcdit- 



$30 
2,000 

10 

3,noo 

300 



Ne San Bruno Rd, 12:12 chus iiw Silver 

avenue 

SEddy, 155 e Taylor, e («xl37:6 

Lots 14, 15, blk 290, 0"Neil and Haley 

E Mission, i'62:6'n 26th,'ri'65':6xVl5...'... 



1 
24,000 



Gift 
Gift 



Saturday, July 13th. 



Nevada Bank to John Reynolds... 
Jacob Robinson to Joshua Hendy. 



Jas Kennedy to Jennie Kennedy. , 
P Frothingham to Sav and Ln Soo 



Bridget Trcmey to Same 

Margaret Smith to Chas Smith.... 
Gabriel Jacobs to F Walter 

Adolphe Leveque to W B Berwick 
C J Thistlethwaite to P P Gerrish.. 
Danl Sheerin to Nicholas Young., 

Chas Mavne to Wm Thompson!. . . 
Jno McCann to Richd McCann.... 

Richd McCann to Jno McCann.... 



Lots 342. 344, P V Lands 

Lot 16, blk 150; lot 8, blk 387, S S F Hd 

and R R As-^ociation 

iSc 14th and Castro, s 50x100 

E Van Nesfl, »3:(J s Broadway, s 35x100; 

nud s Broadway, 100 e Van Ness, e 2:J 

X 137:6, 



E York, 275 s 22d, s 25x100 

W Capp, 40 n 22fi, n 40x122:0 

Und }4 s 16lb, SO e Guerrero, e 8^t:3xi:W; 

ne Franklin and Page, e 51x100 

Lots Oil, 101. Gift Map No 1 

;S 0.'»k,S7:6 e Buchanan, e 23x120 

Sw Brnderick and O FarreU, w 100 s s 

55. 

S 28lh, 100 e Church, e 2.5x114 

Beginning 205 se Howard and 137:6 ne 

11th, ne 22:6x70 

N Dnncan, 80 w Sanchez, w 80x114.. 



400 
10 



>,150 

1,400 



i,750 
450 



Monday, July 15th. 



J AMcQ,uadetoFranco-Am SvBk N Lombard, 109: 
Unknown Owners to C E P Wood 



Emma McKenna toF Gudehus.. 
Leopold Diamantto Jas C Weir. 
Jno H Wiee to A B de Baker 



c Jones, e 28x100 

Commencing 60 w Powell and 70:7X n 
Post, n 1:4^x20:3 

S Harlan pi, 172 w Dopont, w 21:6x60. . 

Se Sacram'nto andGouirh,e81:3sl27:8^i 

Nw Washington and Leavenworth, w 
137:6x137:6 

S Polk lane, 117:6 e Stockton, e 30x57:6. 

Lot 1, blk 2. San Miguel Rancho. 

Lot 23 in Section 23 

Lot 36 in Section 23 

Commencing 100 s 20th and 150 w Potre- 
ro av, e 50 X nO 

W Church, 57 n 21st, n 57x105.... 

Same 

Ne Green and Fillnore, n 41xS7:6. 

Se Francisco and Fillmore, s 68:9x1-37:0 

E Fillmore, 68:9 s Francisco, s 6S:9 s 
i:J7:6 

W Po'rero av, 400 s Butte, s 8 x w 480., 

N St Roses, 40 e Cook, 6 25x100 

Goods, chattels, etc, for benefit of cred- 
itors 

S 25th, 203 e Sanchez, e 25.9x114 ,.. 

li Army, SO w Sanchez, w 80x114 

I VV Fillmore, 29:5 n O Farrell, n 28:6x100 

Auguft Vnss to August Voss W Tehama. 140 s of P V lot 118. s 20x80 

Jaa A Duffy to M C Bateman L Broadway, 137:6 w Gough, s 137:6, 

5:6, e 15, n 131:3 to beginning 



Chas Cametoto Philippe Lille. 
Mary Martin to Adam Schilling! 
Mas'c Ccmty As'n to H Rosekrane 

Same to M S Jeffera 

Edw O'Connor to Chrisln Dietrich 



David McNeal to Fredk C Winch. 

PC Winch to Rosacna Winch 

Jacob P Engle to Frank M Pixley. 
Frank M Pixley to Jacob P Englr 
Same to Same et al 



Jno Center to Hannah Kessing — 
Jos S Alcmany to Patk Meehan... 
Marg A Miller to A Hinz et al..., 

W S Edwards to Christian Wendt. 
Hirdegard Koegel to Edward Kerr 
A H Li8i=akto A Franchi et al 



45,300 

3 
3,625 
15,500 

1 

1,800 
6i)<) 



940 
Gilt 
3.500 

2,500 

2.000 



1,250 

1.200 

2, mo 



Tuesday, July 16th. 



Jos Robinson to Geo F Roberts. . 



Mary A Mowry to G FuUermenger| 
Mary Johnson to Owen McCabe . . ] 



City and Co to A B McCreery.. 



A B McCreery to City and Connty 

Henry Winkle to Jno E H Ballingj 

Same to Henry Schulz i 

Same ct al to Clans Gerken I 

Mary Shear to A Hinz et al I 



W Fillmore, 79:6 s Sacramento, s 26:6 x 
106:3 

E Sanchez, 26:6 ii 2Sth, 25x110 

E Washington av, 175 s Precita av, s 25x 
110 

;Nw McAllister and Broderick, n 1-37:5 x 
i:j":6.. 



J n Brnhns lo Jno Higgins I 

John E H Balling lo Henry Schulz 
J S Alemany to Francis Harrison 

H S Levy to Jos Lowenlhul I 

EL Sullivan to W J Gunn. I 

Henry Felker to Getz Rosenberg . . 
J M Comerford to Bridget Fallon . . 



Nw McAllister, 137:6 w Broderick, w 
1.37:6x137:6 

Ne Emma, 450 ee Silver av, se 50x100.. , 
500 " 

400 " " 

Goods, chattels, etc, for benefit of cred- 
itors 

W Perrie, 3H0 n Pt Lobos av, n 95x120. . 

Ne Emma, 450 se Silver av, ee 50x100.... 

N St Roses, 50 w Boyce, w 35xll;0 

S Oak, 110:0 e Gom,'h, e 27.k7! 

Sw Pt Lobos and 18th av, s 600x240 

E Howard, 312:6 n 17th, n -37:6x82 

S 27tb, 104 eChurcb.e 24x114 



$2,700 
420 



600 
COO 
i:UO 

1 

300 

650 

325 

2,000 

10 

4,500 

1,400 



Wednesday, July 17th. 



PatkClearyto Patk Whelan 

Elizabeth Motl to Annie Lewis.,.. 
Mary A Farney to Mary C Reidy. . 
D Manbeim to Bertha V Howaon. 

E C Kennedy to Jno B Cronan 

Same to Peter N Hanna 

Same to to T J Welsh ctal 

Pred'k Anthes to Jos Robinson.. 
Jno A Cardinell to W W Walrasley 

Jno H Tobin to Nicholas Hayes, 
Nat I Gld Bk & T Co to G Palache 

W \V Stow to Morris Spiro 

Hardy H Oates to Wm Hale 

And J Pope to Nicholas Bichard 
Jas C Weir to Jno McDonald et al 
Geo K Porter to T G McLaran 



Wm Hollis toSamc 

T G McLaran to L Stanford.. 



W J Gunn to Catherine Kating 
T G McLaran to J K Porter , . . , 



Und J^ se 26lh and Sanchez, s 114x80.. . 

S Plejisanf,lli:l e Jones, c 2-3:5x60 

NDsr, 57:6el8lb av, n 100xe25 

Se 15tb and Pt Lobos av, s 14S, e 8iJ, nw 
150:4, w (i6:7 to beginning 

Nw Devisadero and Tvler, n 50x125 .... 

W Devisadero, 50 n Tyler, n 50x125.... 

Sw Devisadero and Turk, s 175x125 

S Pine, 106:3 e Steiner, e 25x127:6 

Beginning 254:3 n Visitacion av and 389 
w Carter, w 128 x n 25 

Se 2;3dav and Clement, s 600x120 

Lots 41, 42, blk 2, Flint Tct H'd Assn.. 

N Sutter. 167:6 w Webster, w 27:6x137:6 

Lot 35, Gift Map No 2 

W East, 45:10 s Howard, s 45:10x137:6. . 

E Scott. 106:6 s O'ParrHl, s 31x137:6. . . . 

Sw Valencia and 15th, s 150, w 290, n 
170, e 290 to beg; and c Valencia, 250 s 
14tli, e 155, w to s Valencia, n to beg.. 

ScHiirriet and 15th, e 115:3x250, 

Se 15th and Harriet, e 158, e ISrMlJj", w 
7:15, 8 12;1M, w 72:9K, w to 2d av, n 
170 to beginning 

S Duncan, 203 e Siiuchez, e 25:8x114... 

Part of Harmon Tract 



|1,000 

2,000 

300 

1 

11.950 
3,750 
10.6110 

1,900 

Grant 

10 
5,81.10 

1 

4,200 

,10.000 

15. Of 10 

47.-. 

10,001.1 



July 20, 1878. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LEITER. 



19 



MAR INE IWTEI.I.IOE WCE. 

ARRIVALS AND CLEARANCES AT THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISOO, FOR 
THE WEEK ENDING JULY 10, 1878. 







ARRIVALS. 




OATU. vnasL. 


MASTER. 


WIIBRB PROM. 


BT WUOU CLRARBD. 


J'ly U Sfr Gwririft 


Cavarlj". 


Panama 


WilHam!). Blanchanl & Co. 




St«vt>nson . . 
Minnomann. 


Melbourne .. 
Ulaspow 




.. U 


Hartc LcsmoDd 


Dickson, Do Wolf & Co. 


.. 14 


Hark Lou Im Marie 


Aubault.... 


Iquiqui 


J. W. Grace A Co. 


.. 15 


Bark .\bboy Town 


Shapland . . . 


Brisbane 


Starr & Co. 










U. SchroederiCo. 


.. 16 


Bark KgTcmont Castle. 


Ditchbum . . 


Valparaiso... . 


Order. 


.. Iti 


Bark Frances Palmer.. 


\on Schmi't 


Tahiti 


A. \V. Von Schmidt. 


.. Itiitiark Sm-wdDn 


Lewis 


Sydney 


Rodgers, Mever At Co. 


.. lt);B,irkVttlenUno 


Lequerhie . . 


Bordeaux 


Henrj- Schwerdt & Co. 


. . 17 Sfr ZealBtidift >. . 


Chevalier. . . 


Sydney, etc... 


Williams, Blanchard & Co. 


.. 17 Bark D. C Murray.... 


Frost 


Honolulu 


J. C. Merrill & Co. 


.. l^Ship City ot Bcnarea.. 


Jones 


London 


Dickson, Do Wolf & Co. 



CTLEAKAKCES. 



DATS. VESSEL. 


M.1STER. 


n-IIKRE BOUND. 


C0S8IQNBB8. 


J'lvlSShipSt. David 

. .' 15 S'p Mary Nott«bohm 


Scribner 

Nairn 

Alexander.. 

Gage 

Metzger 

Rabbe 

Hodsen .... 


Liverpool — 

Nanaimo 

Astoria 

Astoria 

Guaymaa 

Honolulu 

Melbourne . . . 


G. W. McNear. 

Williams, Blanchard & Co. 

Goodall, Perkins & Co 


.. 17 Bktne Portland 

.. ISiSt'r Newbeni 


Simpson Bros. & Co. 
John Berminghain. 
J. C. Merrill & Co 


.. 18 Sch> Prithiof 


Olaf Matsen. 



San Francisco, July 15th, 1878. 

Editor News Letter: Two or three weeks ago, you did me the civil- 
ity to insert some remarks of mine anent unwholesome f«od, exposed for 
sale in the markets of this city, notably fish. I ask again for information, 
la there any such document published here by authority of the city gov- 
ernment, once or twice a year, as a statement of the amount and land of 
unwholesome food seized and destroyed by legally appointed officers? and 
if so, where can I obtain it? I am tuld on all hands that this is a "gov- 
ernment b/j the people, for the people." Then who are the people whose 
duty and office it is to look after the health and well-being of the People? 
On Saturday last, I visited some of the markets, and sawfish by the hun- 
dred-weight utterly unfit for human food ; some stinking badly enough to 
make a man sick, and much of the rest only one degree less bad. I won- 
der that all the butchers and vendors of dairy produce do not rise up as 
one man and compel the fishmongers to keep stinking fish out of the 
markets, or else to take themselves out of it altogether. Foul air quickly 
taints fresh meat and all kinds of dairy produce. 

Then, again, there is exposed for sale vast quantities of fruit more or 
less in a state of decay, and offered, of course, cheap, to induce children 
and the poorer classes to buy. 

There is now quite sufficient reason for fearing that San Francisco will 
have ere long a lively, or a deathly, time ; for I read in one of the morn- 
ing papers that the cholera is at this hour in some of the Eastern States 
in its most malignant form, one body having turned black immediately 
after death. As to the mysterious causes of that terrible epidemic we may 
forever remain ignorant ; but from observation we do know that there are 
many causes which predispose a locality to receive it, and individuals to 
take it. Such are sewer-gas, from which hardly one house is free, badly 
aired bed-rooms, stinking meat, stale fish , decaying or unripe fruit and vege- 
tables, and a host of others, nearly all arising out of or centering in the 
careless and dirty habits of the citizens. The presence of any or all these 
conditions does not caiise Asiatic cholera, but predisposes to it ; and, so to 
speak, forms the seed-beds in which it lives, thrives and spreads, if once 
introduced. Melbourne, in Australia, enjoys now the reputation of being 
the second cleanest and healthiest city in the known world, its population 
being over 250,000. But how long would it enjoy that reputation if the 
houses were reeking with mephitic sewer-gas, and its people fed on dis- 
eased beef, scably mutton, measleypork, stale fish and mouldy fruit? 
Years gone by, its people had to learn their lesson in these matters, and 
are not likely to forget it soon. 

This is the way they look after themselves ; and be it remembered they 
are just as much their own masters as are the good people of this free and 
enlightened city. The secret — if there be any secret — lies here : they 
manage to find a thorougly honest man, or two, for executive inspectors 
of houses and markets, make their positions honorable, pay them in a 
manner that puts the chances of their being bribed out of the question, 
and support them in the discharge of their arduous, and often unpleasant 
public duty. 

Once or twice a year the Health Committee of the City of Melbourne 
publish a detailed statement of the quantity and kind of food seized and 
destroyed. 

By the last mail I received the following, which, as will be seen, refers 
only to food seized in the public markets: 

"A return of unwholesome food destroyed at the market for the past 
year: 332 baskets fish, 9,537 pairs rabbits, 49 pairs wild fowl, 52 dozen 
crayfish, 75 bags oysters, 18 cwt. salt fish, with meat, fruit, etc., the quan- 
tities of which are not enumerated." 

I am curious to see how a San Francisco return would figure up. It is 
inconceivable why there should be such laxity, or rather utter carelessness 
here about matters of such vital importance. 

Fish is one of the most wholesome and nutricious articles of food when, 
fresh and in proper season. In nearly all maritime and fluviatile coun- 
tries, fiah forms a staple article of diet for all classes, but particularly the 
laboring. It is also the most abundant and the cheapest. 

During the winter months of 1865, there was much distress in Mel- 
bourne ; wages were low, work scarce, food exceedingly dear, beef twenty- 
five cents and more a pound, and other things in proportion. Great num- 
bers were in abject poverty, depending on alms and the soup-kitchens. 
Just as matters were at the worst, there arrived in our bay vast schools 
of a kind of fish vulgarly called "pilchard" (aclupea), the same I have 
seen here. In one day there was an end to want of food. It then be- [ 



came known that tho fiBher-people of Queenacliff had been for weeks 
aware of their presence a few miles from shore, but did not care to fish 
for them. A few weeks ago, I saw in an English paper how, when re- 
cently tiah became dear at Briatolj some i)lucky feDows fitted out a 
steamer with seines, and went out int.> deep water, hauling their net by 
steam-power ; who, in a few days, gluttered tho market with excellent 
fish, and reduced the price by more than one-half. Can no philanthroiiic 
millionaire be found just now to do the same here, and retail the fish 
without its passing through the hands of agents and middle men? It 
would entitle him to the reputation of a public benefactor. 
John J. Bleasdale, D.D., 

of the Central Board of Health, Melbourne. 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOE WEEK ENDING JULY 

Compiled by Georgb C. Hickox & Co., 230 Montgomery St. 



19. 1878. 



NAUB op MlNB. 



Argenta 

Andes 

Alpha 

Alta 

♦Alps 

Bunion 

Belcher 

Best & Belcher. . 

Benton 

Bodie 

Cons Imperial. .. 
♦Crown Point,. .. 

ChoUar 

California 

Con. Virginia. . , , 

•Caledonia 

Confidence 

De Frees 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer 

Gould & Curry . . 

Gila 

♦Grand Prize,... 
Hale&Norcross. 

Julia 

♦Justice 

Jackson 

Kentuck 

♦Leopard 

Lady Wash'n .... 

*Leviathan 

Leeds 

Mexican 

Modoc 

Manhattan 

Northern Belle . . 

*Ophir.... 

Overman 

Raymond & Ely. 
Rye Patch 



Sierra Nevada . . . 

Silver Hill 

Seg Belcher 

Solid SUver 

♦Succor 

Silver King, Ar'a 
Silv. King South. 

Tip-Top 

Union Con 

♦Utah 

Yellow Jacket.. . 



15j 



16j 



17i 



J 
9 

n 



m 
J 



1 

18^ 



m 



111 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 

OCCIDENTAL AND OEIENTAL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

For JTapan and Cbina, leave irliarf, comer First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC Thursday, May 16th, Friday, Aug. 16th, Saturday, Nov. 16th. 

OCEANIC Tuesday, June 18th, Tuesday, Sept. 17th, Tuesday, Dec. 17th. 

BELGIC Thursday, July 25th, Wednesday, October 16th. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 2 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
DAVID D. GOLTON, President. July 13. 

MILLS' SEMINAEY. 

Tbis well-jbnown Institntjon for Toang:' Iiadies will com- 
mence its next term WEDNESDAY, July 31st. With its fine commodious 
buildings, its ample grounds, and its large and efficient corps of Teachers, the insti- 
tution offers unrivaled advantages for a thorough and finished education. All letters 
of inquiry and all communications relative to admission should be addressed 

REV. C. T. MILLS, 
June 22. Brooklyn, Alameda county, California. 

CUNNINGHAM. CURTISS & WELCH, 

Successors to Joiin O. Hodgre dc Co., Stationers, Boobsellers 
and Importers, Blank Book Manufacturers and Commercial Printers, 327, 329 
and 331 SANSOME STREET. Special attention given to the Stationery Wants of 
Banks, Insurance OfBces, etc., and estimates promptly furnished upon request. 
[April 20.] 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by tbe under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to f umiBh all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCUREIE, Secretary, 
Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 

WANTED. 

Good lilve Business Men to sell tbe Excelsior Improved I^et- 
ter Copying Book. No press, brush or water used ; copies instantly. Agents' 
outfit, §2. 50. Agents make from SIO to §15 per day. Address Excelsior Manufac- 
turing Co. , 47 La Salle Street, Chicago, HI. Incorporated Feb. 16th, 1877. Capital, 
3100,000. Exclusive Territory given. July 6. 



20 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAK" FRANCISCjO NEWS LETTER. 



July 20, 1878. 



■DTNDEEJVERED iLETmiRS. 

No. 4. 

Hon. Iieland Stanlord—SiB: It is with great pleasure that I address 
myself to you, because I know that you are a man to whom every one 
living in this country is vastly indebted- To say that you are a great 
and good man would be to utter merely what I believe, which is not to my 
purpose, for I write in no spirit of empty laudation, but simply with the 
desire of putting to paper those facts which are patent both to your 
friends and to your enemies. And to do this fairly I must be perfectly 
impartial, not surrendering myself solely to the praise of one I admire, 
but also letting my pen dwell upon your transgressions. For that you 
have committed transgressions is evident from the storm of indignation 
which has been burled against you at fitful intervals during the past fif- 
teen years, by people either less fortunate or more righteous than your- 
self — a storm which, in spite of your provoking patience, is now brooding 
over you more darkly than ever. The voice of the People is the voice of 
God, they say, and my unmitigated respect of the " dear public " forbids 
me to cast any reflection upon this modest compliment paid to the people 
by one of the people. It is, therefore, settled that you have sinned 
grievously, and wherein you bavg sinned I will presently show; but I 
have asserted (very boldly, in that just now the assertion contradicts the 
infalible tmx popuU) that you have accomplished much good, and as it is 
my habit to put oflt the evil day always, I will bestow the praise first and 
apply the condemnation afterwards. 

Many years ago, sir, you came to this State, then in its infancy, and 
settled here as a merchant. By business ability and integrity you pros- 
pered rapidly, and soon became a comparatively rich man. You had a 
hobby — a very gigantic one, and as soon as you became possessed of leis- 
ure and means you proceeded to straddle that hobby with the determina- 
tion to ride it or ruin yourself in the attempt. In other words, you con- 
ceived — or, at least, put into practical shape — the idea of the great rail- 
road which now spans this continent, and to the accomplishment of its 
construction you devoted all your remarkable energies. On every side 
you and your fellows met with opposition, but more particularly from 
those quarters where the achievement of your plan has since resulted in 
most good. It is not my intention to rehearse here the history of that 
wonderful undertaking. Suffice it to say that in spite of the ingratitude 
stupidity and open hostility of those who should have been most willing 
to aid the project, it was impelled to its completion by the master mind 
which gave it birth. 

What were the consequences? An outlying province, accessible from 
the regions of civilization only by months of perilous travel, cut off from 
the country to which it belonged by thousands of miles of desert, was 
brought within a week's journey from the great centers of the East ; a 
city which was before but little better than an encampment — so isolated 
its position, so unavailable its advantages, and so unsettled its population 
— was suddenly converted into a great metropolis and world-famed port, 
giving and taking, making and buying, dispensing and consuming all that 
wealth and industry can demand or supply. California, the beautiful and 
priceless fringe of the Hemisphere which had so long lain useless and 
apart, was at length stitched to the hem of Columbia's robe by those iron 
threads which your energy and enterprise had drawn over river, mountain 
and plain. Her value was increased a thousand fold, her prosperity be- 
came what it is, her men, women and children what they are. Other 
towns, cities and villages, too, sprang up in the line of progress which 
you had marked out ; waste Territories became sovereign States ; a great 
strip of howling wilderness blossomed through your efforts into a bloom- 
ing garden. At this day, the vast business you carry on gives employ- 
ment to thousands of men and women, and puts bread into the moutbs of 
multitudes who might otherwise be destitute. Deprive California of what 
you have created, and what would it be? A country of outlaws and vag- 
abonds, if, indeed, it was inhabited at all ; an expensive, useless burden 
upon the Government, only held in order that no other nation might 
hold it. _ 

But, sir, in spite of all this, you must acknowledge that you are ar- 
raigned by the papers and hooted at by the mob as a tyrant, whose house 
ought to be burned over his head ; as a monopolist, who deserves to be 
stripped and plundered ; and as a criminal, who only escapes the law be- 
cause he is too strong for the law. It is, therefore, time that I point out 
to you those sins, the committal of which has secured for you this unen- 
viable reputation. 

Your first and greatest crime is that you have dared to grow rich. In 
some countries there is considerable truth in the cynicism that it is a sin 
to be poor, but in California, where that curious animal called the " Work- 
ingman" {horn ykandibus sonoftoilerus) abounds, wealth is undoubtedly an 
evidence of iniquity, especially in the eyes of those who have it not. 
You obtained great privileges, immunities, and grants from the United 
States Government to help you build your railroad. It was bad enough 
that you did not leave the road unbuilt rather than obtain these ; but 
having obtained them, it was clearly your duty to give your time, talents, 
and private capital for nothing, and* to distribute all the profits of your 
undertaking among the newspapers and "workingmen." But a crime of 
almost equal magnitude to that of being rich, is that of letting people 
know that you are so. You have dared, sir, to spend your money freely, 
and have even gone so far as to give yourself some of the benefits of your 
earnings. You have, at immense expense, set up a great dwelling-house 
on a bill, overlooking the city — a house, mind you, finer than a " work- 
ingman" can'Jhave, and in a pleasanter location than "workingmen's" 
houses generally are. How can you excuse yourself? It is true that 
*' workingmen " were employed to dig its foundations, to build it, and to 
decorate it, and that by this means hundreds lived out of your purse for 
many a long month in "hard times "; it is also true that your house aud 
its Nob Hill neighbors reedeem the city from being a collection of shant- 
ies, and give us something to boast about ; it cannot be denied that your 
horses need grooms to care for them, your luxuries servants to administer 
them, your banquets cooks to prepare them, your pictures artists to paint 
them, and so forth ; and it shall not be forgotten that your charity is mu- 
nificent. But all this does not palliate your insolent presumption in dar- 
ing to display your taste and spend your money. If you must be rich, 
then keep your dollars in a stocking, like one capitalist I could name, or 
invest it in foreign three-per-cents, like another, or let "your family squan- 



der it in Paris, or use it to plunder servant girls in stock operations — in j 
short,. do anything you like that is mean and cunning with it, but don't — ' 
please don't — tantalize and provoke the poor, horny-handed ones, by 
spending it like a prince in their midst. In this manner, they all get 
some of your wealth, it is true, but that only makes each of them itch 
for all of it ; and I put it to your sense of honor, whethef it is right to 
tempt a worthy " workingman " to be covetous. 

Black and unpardonable as these sins are, yet, Sir, when I compare 
them with the good that you have accomplished, I am obliged, as I have 
already said, to accord you admiration. But I am only a very incon- 
siderable unit in the mass, and as my opinion cannot save you from con- 
demnation, I will conclude this letter with a little wholesome advice, 
which you will not fail to follow if you desire to gain the esteem of those 
who now despise you. Proceed with all possible dispatch to burn down 
your big house on the hiU, or rather call in a " Workingman" to do the 
job for you. Without seeing myself what good this would do, I know it 
would do good, because Kearney says so. Buy a new printing-press for 
each of the daily papers, give each of them a good round sum in hand, 
and pay in advance for a column advertisement, to be inserted in each 
for ten years. By doing this you will not only silence evil report, but 
may even hear of something to your advantage. Distribute the re- 
mainder of your wealth, in equal portions, among all those who call you 
" Monopolist," because they hanker after your dollars. This would not 
only set the " Workingmen's" party on its feet to the tune of about a cent 
for each member, but would also enable you to pass the evening of your 
life in that poverty which your enemies seem to regard as the fitting re- 
ward of merit. Hoi>ingthat this counsel will not be unheeded, I have the 
honor. Sir, to subscribe myself your respectful servant, 



"WHAT THE CONGRESS HAS ACCOMPLISHED. 

The closing of the "Congress " and the return of the plenipotentiaries 
to their respective countries, leaves nothing more to be said about the 
European "difficuUi/;" for the difficulty is ended, and for the time being, 
at least, everything is as smooth and lovely as the most ardent partisan of 
peace could desire. Lord Beaconsfield's speech in the House of Lords 
has told us what the Congress accomplished, and has put in their true 
light the motives by which that august body was actuated and the conse- 
quences of their decision. The whole gist of his explanation lies in the 
statement that " by the changes made in the Treaty of San Stefano by 
the Treaty of Berlin, a menace to the independence of Europe has been 
removed aud threatened injury to the British Empire terminated." Be- 
sides this sum and substance of his whole speech, the chief points made 
by the Earl were these: The Sultan has now a new lease of life in the as- 
sured possession of two-thirds of his former domains, those two-thirds 
comprising at the same time the best part of his empire. That the Bal- 
kans, though lightly spoken of as an indefensible frontier, would prove 
impregnable, in the hands of the Turks, gainst any assaults made by 
such armies as those who besieged Plevna. That Sofia, on the other 
hand, would prove worthless to those to whom it was ceded as a strong 
strategic position. That the loss of Varna by Turkey is amply compen- 
sated by the allotment of Galatz to that power. That the Sultan has se- 
cured a vitally important point in the Pass of Achtilan. That Austria's 
occupation of Bosnia was not a necessity, but was carried out at the sug- 
gestion of the British Plenipotentiaries, and was a great saving of trouble 
and expense to the Porte. That England has resisted the partition of 
Turkey on principle and in the face of great temptation, and has carried 
her point against all but open opposition. That the powers are now unan- 
imously of opinion that the future tranquillity of Europe will be best se- 
cured by maintaining the sovereign rights and independence of the Sultan. 
That Russia's acquisitions in Armenia are insignificant and certainly not 
important enough to have justified England in going to war for their re- 
conquest. That the vast interests which England has at stake in the East 
make the Anglo-Turkish Treaty a reasonable and necessary measure. 
And, lastly, that Russia has now been distinctly warned that she has gone 
far enough. 

Lords Granville and Derby openly condemn the occupation of Cyprus. 
The former because he, as is well known, is stubborn enough to oppose to 
the bitter end everything that is done by his political opponents; the lat- 
ter because he is a disappointed and vindictive man. But a curious 
feature of the controversy is that Stanley of Derby declares that he left 
the Cabinet because he dissented from the plan of a secret Indian expe- 
dition, while Cecil of Salisbury gives this assertion the lie direct as 
strongly as he can do so in parliamentary language. 

The reception of Lord Beaconsfield, on his return from the Congress, 
has been worthy of the great nation he represented and served so well. 
Should a dissolution of Parliament be now resolved on, the old Earl will 
most undoubtedly enter upon a new lease of office, and for this reason, it 
seems to us, that a dissolution is what aU Englishmen ought to most de- 
voutly desire. He has upheld the honor and dignity of Great Britain 
like a thoroughbred; he has shown himself an overmatch for the best 
statesmen Europe could produce, and he has done infinitely more than 
any other one man to avert a fearful war. For these things he deserves 
to be remembered and honored by his countrymen, both as a Premier and 
as a man. 

Thus endeth the European imbroglio — for the present. It is our inten- 
tion to give, next week, a rapid resume of its salient points, from the first 
blow to the finishing stroke, and having done this, our labors, so far as it 
is concerned, will be ended. 

On last Tuesday night Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Yost celebrated their 
tin wedding, commemorating their ten years of unalloyed matrimonial 
felicity. Relations of both families assembled to do honor to the happy 
and estimable couple, and many and hearty were the congratulations ex- 
tended. We wish them long life. May they see many a^ decade of do- 
mestic happiness, and may misfortune never dim the brightness of the 
noonday of their affections. 

A Lusua Naturae. —At Swain's bakery, on Sutter street, can be seen 
a splendid specimen of what the Potrero can produce in the plum line. 
The specimen exhibited was raised in Mr. Swain's orchard. The branch 
is about 18 inches long, and over a hundred fine plums cover it. 



The Special Organ of " Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Co."— Fred. Marriott, Patontee. 



Prloa par Copj, 10 Cante.] 



ESTABLISHED JCLT, 20, 1866. 



[Animal Snlxorlptloa, 16. 



9^N FR^eeseo 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTEilESTS OP CALITOBNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST; 



Vol. 29. 



SAN FEANOISOO. SATUEDAY, JULY 27, 1878. 



Ho. 2. 



Office of the Sau Francisco News liOtter, Slerchaut Streec, 

No3. 007 to 615, San Francisco, 

GOLD BARS— 890@915— Silver Bars— 6@16 ^ cent. disc. Treasury 
Notes are seUinff at par. Buying, 99j. Mexican Dollars, 7@7i per 
per cent, nominal. Trade Dollars, 2^@3 per cent, discount. 

Jl^ Exchange on New York, h per cent, for Gold ; Currency, 100. On 
London, Bankers, 49Jd. @ 49g ; Commercial. 49gd. @ 49|d. Paris, 
sight, 5 francs per dollar. Tele^ams, 6-10@| per cent. 

JW Latest price of Gold at New York, July 26th, at 3 P.M., lOOi. Latest 
price of Sterling, 483@486, 

jW Price of Money here, 5@1 per cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
open market, l@li. Demand active. 



PRICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVEBNMENT BONDS. 

San Francisco July 26, 1878. 



stocks and Bonde, 


Bid. 


Asked 


U. S. Bonds, 5-20S 1S67-68. . 


106 


lOUJ 


Legal Tender Notes 

S. F. Citv * Co. B'ds, 63, '58 


m^ 


99} 


104 


— 


S. F. City Bonds, 7s 


107 


— 


Sacramento City Bonds. . . . 


30 


— 


Yuba County Bonds, Ss 


100 


— 


San Mateo Co. Bonds, 7s. . . 


102 


104 




93 


94 


National G. B'k & Trust Co. 


75 


80 


Spring Valley Water Co 


93 


94 


I 


JRECKI' 


■RIDOE 



Slocks and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co. 
Front St.. M. & 0. R. R. Co. 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad.. .. 



Asked 
25 



110 
115 



& Yost, Brokers, 304 Montgt)mery street. 



THE STOCK MARKRT. 
The strong upxffard movement that continued throughout last week 
found its culminatins: point on Monday, when a sharp set-back was ex- 
perienced, and since that time the market has been on the down grade. 
Ophir was the first stock to tumble, and it is generally believed that the 
break was occasioned by the insiders, who were disposing of their stock 
upon unfavorable reports from the mine. In view of the limited sales of 
the stock, it has much the appearance of a bear movement, especially as 
the decline is altogether disproportionate to the amount of the sales. 
Shrewd operators are of the opinion that the break was made with the 
purpose of gathering in Sierra Nevada and Union, and the steadiness 
maintained in these stocks, and the heavy transactions ruling, would 
seem to justify such an opinion. The shaft of the North Con. Virginia 
has been recently purchased by the Bonanza firm, and will be used in 
prospecting and working Sierra Nevada and Union. This fact would 
seem to lend additional strength to the foregoing opinion as to the cause 
of the break. Reliable news from Ophir is very scarce, though there are 
parties who claim to be in daily receipt of information from the mine. 
The mine will be open to experts on the 30th inst., and imtil that time 
the street must grope their way in the dark. There is no particular news 
from other mines on the lode, the market for all other stocks being 
directly influenced by tne fluctuations of the North end. In Julia they 
are rapidly reducing the water, which will be entirely removed by to- 
morrow night, when the work of cross-cutting will be pushed ahead at 
once. At the close the market showed signs of a slight reaction, but 
trifling, however, as compared to the extent of the break. Outside stocks 
are without any particular change, with the exception of Bodie, which is 
in great demand at continually improving rates. News of the fabulous 
richness of this mine has just been received. A rich streak in the ledge 
is said to assay over S2,200, while the entire ledge gives an assay value of 
over §400 per ton. Eureka Consolidated shows a material reaction for the 
set-back of a few days previous. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, July26tb, 
1878.— Gold opened at lOOi; 11 A.M., at lOOJ ; 3 P.M, at 100|. United 
States Bonds — Five-twenties of 1867, 105§ ; 1881, 107§. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 83@4 86, short. Pacific Mail, 15|. Wheat, SI 15@S1 28, strong. 
Western Union, 91g. Hides, steady, fair demand, 19@19^. Oil— Sperm, 



Winter Bleached, 97 ©105. Whale Oil, 40"@45; Winter 
Bleached, 51@58. Wool— Spring, fine, 18@26 ; Burry. 10@14 ; Pulled, 
24@35 ; Fall CUps, 15@20 ; Burry, 14@18. London, July 26th.— Liver- 
pool Wheat Market. 10s. ld.@10s. 5d. Club, lOs. 4d. ©lOs. 8d. United 
States Bonds, 108i@107. Consols, 95g@95 5-16. 



Rural Visitors. — During the Summer months parties going into the 
country to the Springs, etc. , can have the News Letter sent them for a 
week or longer by prepaying for the same at the oflSce, 609 Merchant 
street. 

I.AT£ST ATOMS OF NEIVS OF FACT AND THOUGHT 



We are glad to announce that the extensive and important freight 
and charter department of the enormous business of the late Isaac Fried- 
lander wiU be carried on henceforward by R. Emmet Doyle and Capt. Chas. 
Wilson. Both these gentlemen are more than favorably known by com- 
mercial business circles both here and in foreign ports. Both are possessed 
of the most thorough experience in their business, and the new firm will 
command the confidence and patronage of shippers and freighters every- 
where. Captain Wilson is not only a '49er, but a '48er, and no man in 
the community stands more deservedly high in the best attributes of 
business man, citizen and genial gentleman. At the risk ot being super- 
fluous, we wish the new firm a career of still greater success and pros- 
perity. The firm's new office is located at No. 18 California street. 

The follo\tring Items of Japanese news are from the Japan Gazette 
of the 29th ult. : The City of Tokio made the fastest run on record between 
Hongkong and Yokohama, the trip occupying only 4 days, 19 hours and 
23 minutes, beating the best time previously made by 2 hours and 12 min- 
utes.— Half the amount of the domestic loan of twelve and a half million 
dollars is already subscribed.— —There is cholera in Tokio.— A new 
foreign-going steam vessel company is in course of development. " Ap- 
plications for the publication of about ninety different newspapers have 
been made to the Home Department since the beginning of this year. 
Sixty of the applicants received publishing licenses. 



City of Tokio-All Safe —The Pacific Mail Steamship City of^ Tokio, 
from Hongkong via Yokohama, arrived yesterday morning with the 
Chinese Commissioners and other passengers, and for cargo 72,933 pkgs. 
— say 3,713 tons. Of this 16,535 pkgs. Teas and Silks go East overland. 
The balance of cargo— say: Rice, 48,862 pkgs.; Oil, l,i20 pkgs.; Opium, 
72 pkgs.; Sugar, 228 pkgs.; Teas, etc. — are for this city. The Independ- 
ent steamship Great Republic arrived yesterday from Astoria with: Sal- 
mon, 5,086 cases; Wool, 552 pkgs, etc., besides a large number of passen- 
gers from Oregon. 

Beerbohm's Telegram.— London and Liverpool, July 26, 1878.— 
Floating Cargoes, quiet; Cargoes on Passage, ditto; Mark Lane Wheat, 
steady; Liverpool Spot Wheat, ditto; No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 43s. 6d.; 
ditto, for shipment, 40s. 6d.@41s. ; Red Winter Off Coast, 47s.; Califor- 
nia Off Coast, 51s. ; ditto, nearly due, 503.; ditto, just shipped, 47s. ; 
ditto, Club, lOs. 4d.@103. 6d. ; ditto, Average, lOs. ld.@103. 4d. ; Red 
Western Spring, 8s. lld.@9s. 5d. ; Arrivals Off Coast, small; English 
Country Markets, firm ; French Country Markets, steady; Wheat in 
Principal Porta, moderate; Consols, 95|; Sterling Exchange, 83@86; 
Gold, \. 

It is reported of Lord Beaconsfield that, as there was some delay in 
the receipt of the answer, he held to the point under reference as to an 
ultimatum, and that he had his belongings ready packed ^vith the inten- 
tion of instantly quitting Berlin in case the reply should be adverse to his 
views. It is certain that the firmness of the British plenipotentiaries had 
much to do in bringing the Czar round to their views. 

The Crown Agents for the Colonies have invited tenders for £400,- 
000 Natal Government Four and a Half per Cent. Debentures, at a mini- 
mum price of £92 lOs. , or, making allowance for deferred payments, about 
92^. Of this amount £350,000 is required for railways, and the' remainder 
to meet the cost of importing CooUe laborers from India. 

"What the Leading Jewelers are Assessed at. — The seven leading 
jewelers are assessed on the Assessor's books as follows: Anderson & Ran- 
dolph, 848,000; Braverman & Levy, S30,000; Colonel Andrews, $15,000; 
W. K. VandersUce, 812,000; G. C. Shreve, $35,000; Kohler & Ritter, 
S9,000; Barrett & Sherwood, $20,000. 



July 20th, 1878.— The Hackberry Mill & Mining Co., of Arizona, 
made its annual shipment of $14,000 for the week ending July 20th. This 
is the eighth shipment from the new mill. 



London, July S6, 1878.— Latest Price of Consols, 95 3-8. 



-±t: 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Pradericfc Marriott, 607 to 616 Merchant Street, San Francisco, Oallfomla, 



?>r>« 



.JJvjJwf^?* 2:j^. 



^r^T 



2 



SAK FRAIS^CISCO imWB LETTER AND 



July 27, 1878. 



MEDICAL QI7ACKBR7. 

Editor of News Ijetter : Sie: The public and the medical profession 
are alike indebted to you for exposing the abominable system of touting 
by which unfortunate people are roped into the offices of quacks. Their 
emissaries attend the ferry boats, on the arrival of every train from the 
country; and if a passenger only looks ill or walks lame, he will not lack 
advice as to wbich doctor he should consult and which avoid. It is as- 
tonishing that any sensible persons should pay attention to such advisers. 
They ought to be assured that no respectable physician or surgeon would 
condescend to such a nefarious system of obtaining practice, or share their 
profits with such scoundrels. These touts are like confidence men — they 
turn up on the trains, ferry b«ats, street-cars, and on the corners of the 
chief tnOTOughfares. They set a watch on the oflBces of the regular phy- 
sicians and surgeons, and whenever they see a strange visitor, or one who 
ia apparently suffering from some chronic ailment, they track him to his 
hotel or home, and under a variety of pretenses they endeavor to obtain 
his confidence, depreciate the skill of his doctor, denounce his treatment, 
and vaimt the skill and capacity of their own employer, who is loudly 
proclaimed to be the sole proprietor of a miraculous, certain and speedy 
method of cure. Human nature is weak. Very few people, laboring un- 
der the depressing influences of chronic disease, are able to resist the 
hope that some heaven-bom doctor may yet restore them to their former 
state oi health. Every day men of the greatest business capacity, and 
of great common sense in the ordinary affairs of life, commit their bodies 
to the treatment of male and female quacks, utterly without education 
and professional knowledge, simply because some one has told them that 
they have recovered from some terrible disease whilst taking the treat- 
ment prescribed. We hear, for example, of millionaires going to a Chi- 
nese doctor, who represents the knowledge of 3,000 years ago, by whom 
burned cobweb and serpent's dung are invested with miraculous virtues; 
and we can, therefore, scarcely wonder that the plausible stories of a 
clever tout should frequently disturb the confidence of invalids whose 
condition requires patient and persevering treatment. 

The public should also recollect that the class of quacks employing 
touts care nothing for their patients' cure. It is their money they are 
after, and they have a variety of clever expedients for extracting it. For 
example, when a patient is becoming discontented with his progress, they 
resort to a consultation of quack professors to restore his confidence. The 
patient is told that he will be submitted to the examination of the most 
eminent physicians in the city. He is stripped and sounded, and a formal 
order for his treatment is drawn up, which will probably require some 
months to carry out. Before this the condition of the patient probably 
becomes hopeless. The time during which intelligent treatment might 
have been successful passes by, and thus many an unfortunate victim is 
robbed and inveigled to his death. Meantime the public should know 
that the persons who figure as the principals in these consultations were 
formerly conspicuous members of the quack list, by which you used to 
warn the public of their true character, and who now unhappily pursue 
their avocations under the very sanction of the law. — Yours, obediently, 

San Francisco, July 25th, 1878. M. K. C. P. 



BOGUS GOLD DISCOVERIES OF THE PRESS. 

Editor Wevrs Letter: Believing with the world dt large that you are 
honestly hearing all humbug statements, I beg to say: Some of the San 
Francisco press are creating an excitement about the rich gold field at the 
ocean beach, near the outlet of the Laguna de la Merced, and speak of it 
as being a new discoveru. Such is not the case. Many persons in this 
city and all those living in the vicinity of the reported gold field, have 
known of the existence of gold in the black sand on the beach for the 
last twenty-Jive years, and many tons of the sand have been sent to this 
city and other places for assays, but in all instances it has been pronounced 
unprofitable. This, however, is not likely to deter Mr. Fraser and his 
party from testing the matter to their full satisfaction; but I must protest 
against Mr. Fraser and some reporters using my name in the way they 
have. It has either been done maliciously, or some person has imposed 
upon their good or evil nature. Certainly, if they have any spark of 
manhood, or sense of honor, they will contradict the false statement they 
have published. Let this suffice as a contradiction. I don't own any 
large or small tract of land in the State. I don't know Mr. Fraser (who 
says I staid by and saw him wash out gold-dust, and then went and 
staked out a claim over his); I have not been on the beach for many 
months, and I am the last man in the world to do him or any one else an 
injury. I have been an invalid for some time, and wish to live in peace 
with all mankind. Alfred A. Green. 

San Francisco, July 20tk, 1878. 



THE BRITISH W^OKKMAK. 

If I could give you a fair idea of the north country dialects, which 
I certainly cannot, the following little recital of conversation might be 
somewhat more amusing ; but let thtf truth make up for the want of fun. 
Last week a deputation of three Blackburn men went before a proprietor, 
to protest against the 10 per cent, reduction. After the business part of 
the interview was over, the manufacturing gentleman turned to one of the 
delegates of the mighty working-class, and said in the district lingo ; *'A 
want to talk to thee, me man — how much is thee gettin' aweek?" "Well, 
adun'noa; bout pound or twenty-five shillin'." "What's thy wife an' 
fam'ly gottin' ?" " Well, a dun'noa, mebbe two or three pound. Ma three 
dowters, hoo's gettin' aitch fourteen shillin'." "What's thou bring home 
thysen?'' "Well, a dun'noa," "Dust'no know thoust made a boast thou 
never brings a ha'penny o' thy money home for five years ?" "I dun'noa, 
but that's nowt to do wi' the 10 per cent. A man ha ma spendin' brass." 
And this is no prettily made-up little paragraph, but an "ower true 
tale." — Pictorial World. 



We are happy to quote the following from the Jewish Progress, so 
much in aid of the progress and architectural advancement of our city: 

The plans for the erection of the new B'nai B'rith Association building 
presented by the well-known architects, Laver & Curlett, has been ac- 
cepted by the committee. That the gentlemen mentioned will give the 
best satisfaction, we certainly have no reason to doubt, their past success- 
ful professional experience being ample proof. We congratulate the asso- 
ciation on the selection, and are convinced that the building in contem- 
plation will be an ornament and a welcome addition to the city. 



SIGNAL SEXtVTCE . JMCETEOBOIiOaiCAL HEPOKT, WSEE 
EKDIXra JTJLT 05. 1878. SAN FRA JTCISCO. CAL. 

Bighett and I^oweat Sarometer. 



Fri. 19. 



29.91 
29.84 



53 

84 

SW. 

267 
Fair. 



Sat. 20. 



29.95 
29.34 



Son. SI 



29.94 



Hon 22. 



Tue. 23 



29.95 
29.92 



SO. 03 
29.93 



.01 



Maximum and Minivfium Thermometer, 

65 I 65 I «2 I 62 I 61 I 
53 I 54 I 54 I 54 I 64 I 

Mean Daily Numidity. 
79 I 78 I 79.7 [ 79.3 [ 81.7 | 

Prevailing Wind. 
W. I SW. I SW. I SW. I SW. [ 

Wind— Miles Traveled. 
265 I 239 I 275 j 297 ( 329 | 

State of Weather, 
Fair. [ Fair. | Fair. | Fair. 1 Fair. 1 
Sainfall in Twenty-four JEEours. 

I I I I t 



29.96 
29.84 



63 
53 

81.7 

SW. 

250 

Pair. 



Total Rain Ituring Season beginning tTuly 1, J87S... .01 inches. 



SANITAR7 NOTES. 

Eighty-four deaths occurred this week, as compared with 97 last and 
105 for the corresponding week last year. There were 51 males and 33 
females; 26 were under 1 year, and 24 between 30 and 50 years of age. 
Only 1 person died of old age. There were 2 accidental deaths, 1 suicide, 
and 10 Chinese. There was no death from diphtheria, but 2 from typhoid 
fever, 6 from infantile cholera, 1 diarrhea. Whooping cough is very 
prevalent, and is of a severe type. It was fatal in 5 cases this week. 
Acute pulmonary complaints have much declined. This week there was 
no death from bronchitis, and only 2 from pneumonia. There were 10 
deaths from consumption, and the large number of 5 from heart disease. 
There were no deaths either in the Third or Fifth Wards, and only 1 in 
the Eighth; 13 deaths took place in the Fourth Ward, and 11 in the 
Eleventh; 16 people died in the public institutions. 

Some days ago, I saw an article in your paper stating that dried 
apples were an effective remedy for the goat nuisance. I tried it yester- 
day. A goat got into my yard and I fed him with seven pounds of dried 
apples. After that, I set him out a bucket of water, and he drank it 
dry. Then he began to swell, and in half an hour he was as big as the 
bass drum of a circus. His skin stretched out so that when he got to the 
sunlight you could count his ribs. He kept on swelling, until I supposed 
he'd burst and blow things all to pieces. But he didn't. Finally I got 
tired of waiting for him to burst, and tried to drive him out of the yard 
with bricks. The first brick I biffed him with bounded back as if it had 
struck India rubber, and knocked one of the lights out of a French plate- 
glass window. He's swelled so big that I can't get him through the gate, 
and the swelling refuses to come down. If I take down that fence it will 
cost me S25 to put it up again. What shall I do? John Dobson. 

Answer. — Keep cramming him with dried apples and water until he 
explodes. Make a grand Fourth of July salute of him. — Exchange, 

The Salmon Business. —This season has been very unfavorable for 
salmon packing on the Pacific coast. On the Sacramento river it has 
been very disastrous. A considerable amount of additional capital had 
been invested, two new canneries having been put in operation. The 
run of fish was so small, however, that two of them were imable to do 
anything, and the other three have shut down after putting up about 
half what they expected. On the Columbia river the record is a little 
better, but the product will be much smaller than an average, and consid- 
erable money will be lost. In British Columbia the season has been a 
very poor one, and with additional facilities a smaller business will be 
done. The Oregon canners have fared so badly between the small run of 
fish and the high prices paid fishermen, according to the journals of that 
State, that a large number of them must go into the hands of creditors; 
and unless some conservative measures are adopted by the Legislatm-e, it 
ia fe^ed that the business will go down entirely. 

Oeorge Appleton's Death. — Last week witnessed the death of one 
of the most eminent publishers in America, George S. Appleton, of the 
famous New York firm. Mr. Appleton was comparatively in the prime 
of life, being at the time of his death but fifty-seven years of ^e. He 
had been in the publishing business nearly his entire life, and was highly 
esteemed throughout his profession and throughout the coimtry. His 
funeral took place from Grace Church, and was very largely attended. 
All of the publishers of New York were present, and resolutions in 
memory of the deceased, and highly commendatory of his character, were 
passed at the meeting of the Publishers' Association. 

From Oregon. — We have the steamer Oregon, from Portland, with a 
large and valuable cargo, consisting of Salmon, 5,794 cases ; Flour, 4,500 
qr. sks.; Wool, 1,816 sks.; Wheat, 1,244 bushels, besides a lai^e quantity 
of lesser produce. The Portland Oregonian, of July 20th, says the catch 
of Salmon on the night of the 17th, on the Columbia, was, perhaps, the 
largest of the season. The average of one cannery was fifty fish for each 
boat out, and one boat took 111. The catch was reported equally good 
all along the river. 

Fruits. — Our markets are glutted with Peaches, Plums, Pears, Apples, 
Berries, etc. The every day supply is immense, say 10,000 packages. 
The canners do much, and consume the lion's share; but the Ipcal family 
demand is unusually light, by reason of the cool weather. High charges 
f or drayage; high cost of packages, etc.; too much trouble and bother to 
consumers. Abolish them. 

Sugar and Hemp h'om Manila. — We have a second large cargo in 
this week. The British ship Portia, to Falkner, Bell & Co., brings 58,102 
bags Sugar for the California Refinery, and 1,000 bales of Hemp to the 
Cordage Factory, making in all this week 2,000 bales Hemp and 115,250 
bags Sugar. 



July 27, 1878. 



CAUFOUNIA ADVERTISER. 



3 



WELCOME. '* JOHN Y' 

Tosterday momlag tho CU;/ of Tokio nrrivoil from China nine days 
IwhimI tiiii*'. tho «U-l!iv U'iny cauH«il l»y the lMVftkiiiK»>f » crnnkpin, Tlio 
wriv.il uf chili voisMel hiw been hMtkiuI for with e»iH*oiftl iiiterOHt, Iwcauso 
slw linn;;s with hor ttio Ohint'so Aiiibiui8uil<>r aiul xilito, uml i\ hir^u C'on- 
mlnr cor\vi ni Cfh-MtiaU. In tht> muuu of all Hvusible men we lji<l our 
illiuiitrioutt vitiitor, tho Miiiiittor IMeiiipotoiitiikry, and his subonlinatea a 
hearty welcome to our shores, ami we sincertily trtist that thoir stay in 
uur miUt wilt leji-l to in iro cr»'iUt il)lo relatinnn bot-weon the people of 
thiM ctiuntry am! the t-hinese r^-f^itlcnta th;»n ha>* hitherto existe»i. Wo 
havu alwuvH huh), and we titill hoUI. that tho Cluneao havo dono much 
g»>-Ml for this and other States. Many of t»ur yrvutest work.-* uro the re- 
sult of their lalior. Their industry tills our lield«, and thoir masterly skill, 
by roiwou of the low price at which it cjm he obtjiiueil, has made cominer- 
ciul and manufacturing enterprises pnicticable. which but for despised 
" riiinejie cheap labor" would never have been bom. A nation of 100,- 
OOrt.OOO soids -hi;,'hly civilizt;*!. extraordinarily deft, exceedinjjrly iudus- 
triou-*. fru^jul. shitiwd, and well-bohaved -is not the sort of nation that 
the forty million American i>eople should refuse to shake hands with, 
anles.4, in<leed, tliey are afnuu that the law of natural selection may come 
in^» t)|>eration before its time. Therefore we say : WeUome to the 
Chinese I Let them come as thick and as fast as they like. If they can 
only mana;;e to trample out in their sure, persistent way the Communism, 
ajTvinst which our constituted authorities seem powerless to contend, the 
thicker and faster they come the better for us alL 

Tho party remain in 8an Francisco for two or three days, and then pro- 
rcf'l to Washin%'ti>n. 

The Ambaas.vlor has been Commissioner of Education to Spain, Eng- 
land and the United States. His own suit consists of twenty-two per 
Bons, who will reside with him at Wasliington. The Consular corps and 
attaches will bo assigned to duty where their services are moat needed. 

The J'ot:io*s passenger list is as follows: Geo. Cawley, Mr. and Mrs. E. F. 
Mondy and three children.C. Watkinson, A. Gerard, Capt. C. 13. Theobald, 
i:. N". : l)r. J. C. Plugge.W. E. Griosly, wife and 2 children; A.Warner, W. 
V;in<Ier Heyden, W. A. Ogg. Rev. J. H. Ballagh and wife, G. F. Sew- 
ard, wife, 2 children and maid; Rev. \V. E. Parsons, wife and child; El- 
liot Thonii»son, Miss Grace Thompson, H. R. Elliot, Capt. Hallowes, R. 
N. ; (J. W. Henderson, L. Holiues, Capt. James Hardie, H. L. Heai;n, 
G. (r. F. Addis., F. G. Heron, H. O. Vanderliudeu, E. D. Allmrlis, 
Truxton IBeale, L. Blum, O. Coub, His Excellency Cliun Lan Pin and 
suite, composed of 24 persons, 7 clerks and 14 servants, and 25S Chinese 
passengers in the steerage. 

The Embassv is registered at the Palace as follows: H. E. Chun Lan 
Pin, Canton; Yeh Yuan Tsun, Nanking; Sit Ming Cook, Canton ;. Chin 
Shu Ting, Canton; Liu Ijcaug Yuan, Canton; Chun Wai Kroun, Canton; 
Lin Taeang, Canton ; Woo Cheah Shon, Chekiang; Shen Chen Woo, 
Chekiang ; Chun Ho Chun, Nanking ; Chai Sin Yoon^j, Amoy; Lin Rwan 
Chung, Canton ; Yung Hai, Canton ; Sing Tah, Peking ; Yen Sz Chee, 
Cliekiaug; Sin Ching Foo, Chekiang; Rin Yen Su, Chekiang; Woo Lai 
Tang, Nanking; Yaug Waing Tai, Cauton ; Chung Ling Leang, Canton; 
Chin Shin Yin, Cantou ; Tseng Youri Nani, Canton ; Chin Mo, Canton; 
Yung Woong Choong, Canton ; Lee Yan Lnn, Canton, and servants. 

Sit Ming Cook is the Consul for San Francisco, but he will go to Wash- 
ington for instructions and credentials before assuming the duties of his 
position. 

"IT IS A DIRTY BIRD," ETC. 
For low-bred, malicious, ignorant twaddle, of the most despica- 
ble kind, commend us to the so-called "London Letters " of a daily con- 
temporary, which prides itself upon being a "live paper." These letters 
are signed " Eve's Grand-daughter," and have appeared regularly for 
many months in every Sunday jssue of the sheet alluded to. Their writer 
and their publishers will doubtless be as much flattered by the most con- 
temptuous notice, as they are beneath it, but when stuff of this kind is 
persistently thrown at the Public week after week it is as well to let the 
said Publi'j know what sort of missiles it serves as a target for. The 
mission of " Eve's Grand-daughter,*' apparently, is to say everything dirty 
and scandalously untrue about the British Royal Family and Upper Ten 
that the receptacle of her filth can find room for. Anything disgustingly 
insulting to the Queen, whose subject she claims to be, anything bad about 
that sovereign's childj-en ; indeed, anj'thing that reflects discredit upon 
the people of England, is regarded by this scribbling harpy and her pub- 
lishers as the food most acceptable to the literary palate of the people of 
America. It is not one " letter," or two, or half-a-dozen, that deal with 
these dung-bill topics, but crtr?/ letter is replete with them. Even if the 
writer's assertions were true, her animus would be apparent from the fact 
that she can find nothing pleasanter to write about, for if her mind and 
pen were less foul her work might be made very acceptable to many here. 
Inasmuch as that portion of these precious screeds which is not made up 
of lies and beastliness is stolen bodily from the World and Truth of Lon- 
don, we were at first disposed to believe that the effusions of "Eve's 
Grand-daughter" were **made up" in the office of the paper that prints 
them, but we have since found reason to believe tliat their author has 
been in England since she lived in San Francisco, under circumstances 
which leave no room for wonder that her ideas are unclean. 



IN MEMORIAM. 
It is in a spirit of pure sympatliy and gentle reverence that we 
allude briefly to the death of one of the fairest and brightest maidens that 
God ever took to himself again— Ella Piatt. The grief of her family is 
yet too acute, and their suffering too keen to make it desirable to open 
the wound w^hich Death has made by any comments on her virtues and 
her sweet disposition. Grace Church, of which the father of the deceased 
is the well beloved Rector, was decorated more for a bridal day than for a 
funeral. There was no oration, no heart-rending eulogy at the last sad 
service; only the hymns she loved so well, only the comforting words of 
the solemn ritual, and the remains were laid to rest, to await the joyful 
resurrection. She is at perfect rest — has begun the world, as Charles 
Dickens once said— not this world, but the world that sets this world 
right. Dr. Piatt and his family have the sincere, earnest sympathy of all 
who know them. She was but 22 years of a^e. 



The oldest ■woman in the world is claimed to be Mary Benton, of 
Elton, England, who is in her 148th year, and ia as smart and busy as 
ever. 



A CURRENT TRADE FALLACT. 

Any statement calculated to tickle tho national jpride posses current 
among the daily press of tho United States. It need have no lacking of 
facts or (igurcs; und, indeed, may clash with the daily oxperionco of t)io 
average citizen. Our people seem ever ready to believe what they wish 
to be true, and are imbued with that sanguinity that is m.aintainud with 
only tho alightest show of idausibiHty, They refuse to look disaster in 
tho face, and impose a childlike confidence in the slemicr and trembling 
bridge which spans the gulf of ruin. 

There ia much to admire iu tho intrepidity of our people, and their 
elasticity and courage no doubt often carry them safely through great 
perils; but wo have now reached that stage in our national life wlien 
credulity is not always a virtue, and something more than a blind con- 
fidence in the future is necessary to our prosperity. We can no longer 
confide ourfortunes to the current of human events, and rely upon faith 
for success. The nation has grown to manhood, and the confidence of 
youth must give place to calm judgment, reason be substitutctl for liope, 
and prudence guide tlie hand of energy. Our manufacturers antl merchants, 
bankers and statesmen must go to " the blue books" for guid;ince, instead 
of relying upon imagination. We must imitate the jiatient toil and the 
rigid system of investigation and analysis which have built up the power 
and accumulated the wealth of Great Britain. To insure success in our 
industrial pursuits conclusions must be based upon facts, and accurate 
knowledge _ be obtained by experience and careful observation. The 
journal which fosters a feeling of security when danger is ahead, or seeks 
to delude the public into the belief that downright failure is real success, 
is recreant in its duty. 

These remarlcs are suggested by the error which has now been fastened 
upon the popular mind relative to the increase in the exports of manufac- 
tured goods from the United States, during the past tw oor three years. 
Tens of thousands of columns of encouraging comments on this subject have 
appeared in the daily press, and so persistently have their claims been 
put forward that the English journals occasionally exhibit a little alarm. 
Though there has been a decided improvement in the condition of the 
foreign trade of the country, and the exports exceed the imports by about 
8250,000,000 annually, this has rather been brought about by the inability 
of the_ people to pay for foreign commodities, supplemented by an enor- 
mous increase in agricultural productions and an increased surplus of 
articles of food, particularly of live stock and dairy goods. 

Examination of the reports of the Bureau of Statistics at Washington 
will show that there has been a very small increase in our exports of man- 
ufactured goods since 1873. Out of 34 of the principal manufactured 
articles shipped abroad there has been a decrease in the exports during 
the past four years on 12, and on 9 there has been a very small increase. 
On the other 13 the improvement in quantity is almost offset by deprecia- 
tion in price. The greatest increase has been in cotton goods, which 
have risen from 14,000,000 to 123,500,000 yards. This, however, has been 
made possible by the accumulation of stocks, and the wretched condition 
to which factory hands have been reduced, their wages being now lower 
even than in Europe. But, afer all, it is a mere bagatelle, amounting in 
value to only §10,000,000, scarcely a fortnight's business in Great Britain. 
So far from gaining any supremacy in the markets of the world, the im- 
ports of foreign cotton fabrics, despite a high tariff, continue on a large 
scale. In manufactures of iron the foreign business is still trifling, while 
in agricultural implements and railroad cars, in the manufacture of which 
we have peculiar advantages, there is a very important falling off. Leath- 
er, cordage, manures, and cotton seed oil, exhibit a large ratio of gain, 
but these can never become of much consequence. 

FALSE REPORT. 

Wbereas, a report lias beeu freely circnlateil conceruing- 
my business standing in this community, I beg to inform the public that it 
is without the slightest foundation, and for over twenty years no person has ever pre- 
sented a just bill or claim of any kind and been asked to call a second time. Such 
reports could only originate through malicious intent, and whilst I have n- jlectcd to 
notice them at first, the annoyance of their repetition necessitates a public denial of 
their truth. I shall continue my buslncsa in the future as in the past. 
July 27. THOMAS DAY, 122 aud 124 Sutter street. 

Henry B. "Williams. Henry P. Blanchard. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 

SHIPPING ATSO COHHSIlSSlOTfi MERCHANTS, 

Wo, 213 California st., S. F, [July 27. . 

GREAT SACRIFICE 

Of Pianos and Or^aus for Thirty Bays, The larg-c stock ot 
liallet, Davis & Co.'s Pianos and George Woods & Co.'s Organs will be sold at 
less than cast for the next thirty days. These celebrated instruments are the leading 
Pianos and Organs of the world, consisting of Grand, Sq uare and Upright Pianos and 
Or;jana of everystyle. WM. G. BADGER & CO., 

July 27. Nos. 7 and 9 Sansome street, near Market. 

HARRY N. MORSE'S 

(E3:-SlLeriff of Alameda County) 

Detective aud Collectiou Ag-ency, Safe l>cposit Balliling-, 
32fi Mootgomer5 street, Itoom 12, Third Floor. Take the Elevator. Oakland 
Office, in the Glascock Building, corner Washington and Seventh streets, up stairs. 
A. B. LAWSON, Manager for Oakland. This Agency is prepared to do all LEGITI- 
MATE detective business intrusted to its care. It does not operate for contingent 
rewards, and is independent of government or municipal control. July 27. 



B 



LIVERMORE COLLEGE. 



oariingr auU Day School for both sexes. Next term begrins 

JULY 29, 187S. For Catalogues address J. D. SMITH, Principal, 

July 27. 



Livermore, Alameda county, California. 



SILVER KING NORTH MINING CO., 

Pinal County, Arizona. 
Office: Room 36, JTo. 330 Plue St. (Acaaemy Bnilllliis), S. T. 

WUson White. WHITE & KUHL, H. G. KuU. 

Mercbnndlse BroIiers. Crafii Sacks, ^Vool Bags, Cnniiies 
anil'Juto Goods generally. No. 316 CALIFORNIA STRKET, San Fran- 
cisco, Oil. P. 0. Box 2,113. Jnno 15. 



4 



SAK FRANCISCO NEWS LETtER AND 



jTily 27, 1878. 



VENUS AND ADONIS. 

Men who suffer their wives' photographs to be exhibited for sale in the 
shop- will flows run the risk of being thought to get some profit by bo do- 
iDg, fur they otherwise would hardly sanction snch publicity; 

Where are you goin<^ to, my pretty maid, 

I'm going to be photographed, Sir, she said. 

May I go with you my pretty maid ? 

Yes, if you like it, she calmly aaid. 

What is your fortune, my pretty maid? 

My face is ray fortune, Sir, she said. 

How do you live on 't, my pretty maid ? 

By selling my photos, she i^romptly said. 

Then may I mai-ry you, my pretty maid? 

If you 've a title, perhaps—she said. 

THE "WHEAT TRADE. 
Could the advocates of the Corn Laws of England rise up out of 
their graves and behold the vast fleets from every quarter of the earth 
bearing breadstuffs to the populous little island, it would seem a vindica- 
tion of their theory of economy. Year by year the importations of food 
into Great liritain increase, and her statesmen have long since given up 
all hopes of dependence upon the home supply. The annual expenditure 
for food purchased abroad has now reached the enormous sum of 1?IJOO,- 
000,000 per annum— an amount greater than the combined imports of the 
United States by 20 per cent., and nearly equaling our total exports of 
domestic produce. Of this amount, one-fourth is for gi-aiu and flour. 

From 1858 to 1860, the average requirements of the United Kingdom 
of foreign wheat were about 25,000,000 cwt., but it is now above 50,000,- 
000. For the fifteen years ending in 1872, the avera^ie importations of 
wheat and flour were 35,209,487 cwt. Of this, the United States sent 27 
l)er cent., Russia 24 per cent., Germany 17, France 0. and British Ameri- 
ca 5. During the past four years, the proportion furnished by the United 
States has advanced to 45 per cent., that of Russia has declined to 16, 
and all other countries have furnished but 39 instead of 49 per cent. 

The average of Great Britain's wheat and flour imports now amount to 
2,900,000 short tons, and of this our country is called upon for 1,300,000 
tons. Inasmuch as California has a surj^lus this season of something like 
000,000 tons, to which Oregon can add 200,000 more, with abundant crops 
east of the Rocky Mountains, there ^vill be no difficulty in furnishing our 
quota. 

Since the commencement of wheat growing on the Pacific Coast, the 
surplus of wheat in the United States has increased with wonderful ra- 
pidity. The steady reduction of freight charges on the railroads has en- 
abled the farmers of the Worth-west to overcome the drawbacks under 
which they formerly labored, and though the wheat- producing districts 
have gradually fallen back from near the Atlantic seaboard to the Valley 
of the Mississippi, the producers have been enabled to lay down their 
grain in Europe at rates to compete with nearer sources of supjdy. A 
glance at the table below will show the rate of increase in exports of this 
important cerealfrom the United States since 1830: 

Five Tears Bushels Wheat and Flour 

Ending Exported from U. S. 

1830 23,385,247 

1S35 26,823,695 

1840 22,307,501 

1845 34,320,346 

1850 71,608,785 

1855 82,194,545 

I860 117,699,913 ' 

1865 237,055,572 

1870 139,082,289 

1875 308,007,796 

1876 74,750,082 

During the current wheat year, beginning September Ist, 1877, the ex- 
ports of breadstuffs from all United States ports have been as follows: 

TO GREAT BRITAIN AND IBEL^VND. 



From 



New York, July Oth 

New Orleans, July 3d 

Pliiladelphia, July Oth 

Baltimore, July Oth 

Boston, July Oth 

San Fraucisco, Juno 27th,, 

Charleston, July Oth 

Portland, July 1st 

Montreal, etc., July 6th.. 



Total 

To the Continent 

South America, etc., and China. , 



Flour, 
Bbls. 



1,072,029 
18,309 
59,00i 
78,800 
135,041 
101,943 



d4,5 
107,024 



1,677,390 

52,200 

2,070,087 



Meal, 
Bbls. 



7,349 



800 
70 
3S6 



1,350 
1.020 



Wheai, Corn, 
Bush. Busk. 



28,980,011 
482,919 
1.903,120 
e,.S24,7Sl 
2,8-12,020 
5, §.'52, 4^9 
72,457 
1.414,031 
5.563.351 



10,975 53,636,129 

45 10,«S3.r.25 

287.5451 401,265 



17,702.350 
2,037,930 
15,783,13!) 
17',08;J,775 
3,485,507 



164,349 
3,975,495 



59,832,551 
9,229,845 
1,480,712 



From this it will be seen that, for the ten months ending July 1st, with 
a short crop in California, which reduced our surplus nne-half, the 
exports of wheat and flour from all parts amounted to something like 83,- 
000,000 bushels, or 2,500,000 tons, with an equal quantity of other bread- 
stuffs, corn and rye. The breadstuffs exports, therefore, require 5,000 
vessels, of 1,000 tuns each, to transport them. 

This year it is estimated that a surplus of 100,000.000 bushels of wheat 
alone will be produced east of the Rocky Mountains, and we shall have to 
spare from this coast some 27,000,000. It is manifest, then, that, even 
with a large shrinkage in the ultimate out-turn, there will be all that can 
be disposed of. 

A young girl asked her mother's consent to engage herself to her bean, 
showing her at the same time a piece of her own handiwork, a pretty 
match-safe. Her mother drewdown her spectacles and exclaimed: "Mary, 
you can make a match-safe, but I have my doubts whether you would 
make a safe match." Mary sighed involuntarily, and sought consolation 
in singing "The Heart Bowed Down." 



The young man who took a seat near the object of his adoration ex- 
claimed, " This is juxtaposition that suits me! " 



BANKS. 



NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Paid Up Capital 310,000,000, Gold. 

Burplus(U.S. Bonds) $2,500,000, Gold- 

XiOois McXane President. [ J. C. Flood Vice-President. 

JohnW. Mackay, W. S. O'Brien, James G. Fair- 
Cashier H. "W. Glenny. 

Agent at Virginia, Nevada George A. Sling:. 

Agents at New York (62 Wallst.). .C. T. Christensen. C. W. Church. 

Issues Commercial and Travelers' Credits, available in auy part of the world. 

Makes Transfers of Money by Telegraph and Cable, and Draws Exchange at cus- 
toniarj' usances. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. 

EXCHANGE on the Principal Cities throughout the United States, Europe, Japan, 
China and thcEa^jt Indies, the Australian Colouies and !New Zealand, and on Hon- 
olulu, Hawaii. 



New York Bankers.. 



i The Bask of New York, N. B. A. 

\ AUKEICAN ExCOAJiOE NaT. EaSK. 

Smiths. 



T„„,„„ T) „». I Messrs. Smitu, Payne &Sm; 

London Bankers t The Umos Ba^k oy London. 

[May 25.] 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $6,000,000. 

WM. ALTORD Presj«lcut. 

TUOAIAS BROWN, Casbler ] B. MUKBAT, Jr., AsH'l Cnsliier 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfomia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicag-o, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saviny Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virffinia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in ^1 parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Faria, BcrHn, Bremen, Hambui^, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. retcrsburyh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, bhanghai, Yokcbama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Iiicorporate<l by Royal Charter.— Capital paid up, SI, 800.- 
000, with jtower toincrea.se to SlO,000,000. Southe^ist comer California and San- 
somestreets. Head Office — 5 East India Avenue, London. Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoriaand Cariboo. British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Connnercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
aa follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank uf Montreal; Liverpool — North and South 
Wales Bank; ScoUand— British Linen Company; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Me.K- 
ico and South America — London Bank of Mexico and Snutli America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Comjtany of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

WM. H. TILLINGH^VST, FRED'K TOWNSEND, 

May 18. Managers. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Paid ap Capital §3^000,000, Gold. President, R. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors:- R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan. C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, D. D. Colton, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents— London : Baring Bros. & Co.; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Prorincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer& Co. NewYork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, SOver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, Cbii.a and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, 95,00«,000,of wiiich $3,000,000 is fully paid np an 
present capital. Reserve Fund, ^80,000. San Francisco Office, 424 Califor- 
nia street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Assistant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN; Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. Lonih.n 
Bankers, Bank of Englan:! and London Joint Stock Bank ; New York, Drexcl, 
Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact 
all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Fnincisco. 
and between said cities and all parts of the world. March 30. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNLAN BANK, LIMITED. 

A ^O California street. San Frauclsco.— liOiidoii Office, 3 

■^z.-^.-^ Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stuck, $0,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, niak« 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issne Letters of 
Credit available throughout the worid. FRED. F. LOW, > „„„.„„_ 

IGN. STEINHAET, J" Managers. 
P. N. LILIENTHAL, Cashier. Oct 4. 



A, J. Plate. 



W. R CoTRKt. 



H. A. Pl.kte. 

A. J. PLATE & GO., 

Importers aud Dealers iu Guus, Rifles, Pistols, Sporting- 
Ma turial, 
masonic, I. O. O. F. and Military Goods of Every Description. 

— SOLE AOKSTS FOR TUE — 

Celebrated Jiemington Arms, 

510 Sacramento street, between Montgomery and Sansome streets, S. F. 
t^f Nett' Work Made to Order. July 13. 



July 27, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



A BUMMER'S GROWTH. 

Fair Wiw the ft'»wer wliioh proffors now it* fruit— 
The biul he/iiii to swell "ticftth SpriiitjV snft Uew, 
Aiul tfuJeny the wiiuU nf Summer blew 

To f*wtt'r it; ami jjroat stron-r »\\na were nmte 

As tbn»UKh its veins wnrm life Itepran to shuot. 
Ami it put on. each day, aome beauty new ; 
Ami all the fairer, as I think, it KTew 

Beeiiuste the streams wore tears about its root. 

But now our fruit hnn:^'s well withiu our reach, 
And this, iiideed, is time fi>r Ki^theriiig ; 

It hath the bluom of Summer-tinted peat'h ; 
Kaeh charm it hath that auy man could sing. 

Yet ye who t«ste it whisper, each to each, 

'*Not sweet, but very bitter is this thin;^! " 

—Mrs. L. C. Monlton. 

ELECTRICITY AND SOUISfD--THE MICROPHONE. 

The wonders reiurded of Alaiidiu's lauip must sink into iusignilicance 
'ben they are ciunjiared ^vith the doings of that modern necromancer 

hich we call Electncity. 

Klectricity has lately appeared in a new character, as the obedient 
andmaid of sound. Although the connection between the two was, to a 
;;rtiuu extent, known some years ago, it was reserved for Professor Gra- 
am Bell to point out how close this connection is. by the wonderful dis- 
avery of the telephone, which bears his name. The extreme sensitive- 
ess of this instrument as a detector of sounds, which we hardly knew to 
xist, was not guessed at until Professor Huijhes announced a new instru- 

fnt to the world under the title of " the Microphone." 

I'rofessor Hu;,dies was led to his wonderful discoyeiy by experiments 
MTJe i out by means of Bell's tele|»hone ; and in acknowledging the talent 

hich he has brought tu bear t>n liis researches, we must not forget that 
bey have been marie manifest by means of that instrument. In short, 

B may say that " honors are divided." 

We must remind our readers that in the Telephone the electric current 

iuduced Iiy tlie actiou of a magnet on a coil of copper wire place round 

J an iron dia|)hi-agm set in motion by the spaaker's voice causing varia- 
ions iu the current, which variations are faithfully carried to the distant 
'elephone, where they are again translated into sound by means of a du- 
licate diaphragm. The toy Telephone (sold in the streets for the past 
wenty years) told us that a vibrating disc was capable of reproducing 
peocli ; and Bell's Telephone suggested the means of transmitting such 
ibrations to any distance. It must be also rem3raber8d that the Tele- 
phone is self-contained, in that it is quite independent of battery power. 

But Professor Hughes was led by his experiments to place a small elec- 
ric battery in circuit with the Telephone ; aud the results were very 
urious. In the first place, he found, by adding weights to a tine wire 
hrough which the current was flowing, that just before the breaking 
train was reached — just when the fibres of the metal were torn asunder — 

peculiar rushing sound was observable in the Telephone. He then tried 

nether he could reiiroduce this noise by loosely binding the wires again 
)gether, and he found that by this means he had hit upon a wondarfuUy 
ensitive detector of sounds. For any noise near the wires was immedi- 
,tely taken up by the Telephone with startling distinctness. The slight- 
!st attachment of the wires procured him the same results, and he modi- 
ied the jiiined wires into the apparatus shown at Fig. 1. This merely 
■onsisted of three nails, two bein,' parallel and connected with the battery 
vires, and the third resting upon them. 




V 1/ ^r^ 



Fier. 2. Fig. 1. 

Although this ridiculously simple arrangement is capable of transmit- 
ting all kinds of noises to a distant place, the sounds obtained are very 
confused. Professor Hughes thereupon began to extend his experiments 
with different conducting substances. He found to his surprise that nearly 
everything he could bit upon responded in this marvelous manner to 
minute vibrations, but that various forms of carbon gave the most reliable 
results. Fig. 2 shows an. arrangement which leaves little to be desired; 




Fig-. 3. 

indeed, we may say it is so sensitive as to be almost beyond control. It 
consists of a tiny pencil of fine gas coke (such as is used for the electric 
lamp) dropped into indentations in two blocks of the same material. This 
compact little instrument, fastened to a cigar box, will transmit to a long 
distance the ticking of a watch placed near it. The gentle touch of a 
feather, or a camel's-hair pencil, reaches the ear as the rasjjing of a file, 
while the scratch of a quill pen in the act of writing is augmented to a 
loud noise. It will be seen, therefore, that the Microphone not only de- 
tects sounds which without it are inaudible, but it also magnifies them. 
The most recent and perfect form of Microphone is shown in Figs. 3 



and 4. It consists of a base board about three inches long, ui>ou which 
ar« screwed two little angle pieces of brass plate. A metallic bar, pivoted 
on to these bnws supports, hiw at its end a piece of carbon. This carbon 
block rests upon two similar pieces kept tttgether by a cloth hinge place*! 
at the side. The lower block, to which one of the battery wires is at- 
tached, is fastened to the board. The pressure upon these carbon sur- 
faces is controlled by a delicate spring of brass wire, which U attached to 
a screw with a milled head. By turning this screw the pressure can bo 
nicely adjusted, from the very light coutact required for delicate sounds 
to the comparatively heavy pressure wanted when the B<uinds are more 
intense. The carbou used in this form of microphone is pine charcoal, 
which has been subjected, in a suitable recejitacle, to a white heat — a mode 




Fig. 4. 

of treatment which seems to confer upon it properties of great value for 
the present purpose. Breathing, speaking and singing are transmitted by 
this instrument with great fidelity, while the tramp of a fly, about which 
we have all heard so much, is most distinctly audible. 

It has again and a^jain been proved that the most astonishing scientific 
discoveries have been made by means of the roughest apparatus. The in- 
struments devised by the inventor of the Microphone are no exception to 
this rule ; indeed, it would sesm as if Professor Hughes had taken a pride 
in showing what can be d^ne by very simple m^ans. A few nails, some 
sealing-wax. one or two bits of carbon, a penny money-box (which acts as 
a case for Fig. 3); and, finally, a prison for his flies, iu the shape of a com- 
mon match-box, with a muslin-covered hole in it for a window. With 
these simple materials he has constructed what is perhaps the most mar- 
velous in3truni3nt of mideru timss. 

We learn from the H dlfax Guirdlan that the Microphone was lately 
attached to the pulpit of a chapel in that town, the connecting wires be- 
ing carried to a house more than a mile distant. Every word of the ser- 
vice was plainly transmitted through the wires, and " so faithfully did 
the instrument do its work, that the chapel-keeper was heard to close the 
doors after service, walk up the aisle, and up the pulpit-steps in conversa- 
tion with some one else." This story, which we have no reason to doubt, 
will show the marvelous power of the tiny apparatus. But its first really 
practical application has been, in the surgeon's hands, as a detector of for- 
eign bodies, such as bullets, etc. It will also, no doubt, in great measure 
supersede the stethescope in the diagnosis of lung and heart diseases. 

The Microphone probably represents the first step on the border-land of 
a new science. It has revealed to us the undoubted fact that the inani- 
mate things around us vibrate in sympathy with every movement we 
make, and with every sound that proceeds from our lips. The time may 
not be far distant when it will be possible to obtain an automatic record 
in plain black and white of every word we utter — a recording angel who 
will have no tears to blot out those which we might wish forgotten or 
unsaid. — T. C. H., in London Graphic. 

THE AVERILL MIXED PAINT 

IS manafactnrei from strictly pare Wblte Iicad, Zinc, and 
Pure Linseed Oil, to ■which is added Water Glass, which chemically unites the 
ingredients and holds them in solution, so they cannot separate. As a house paint 
it has no equal, producinfj a brilliant glossy finish, impervious to the weather, and 

Will Last Twice as Long 
as any other paint made. It is of pure white, and any Shade or Color desired, mixed 
ready for the brush, so that any one can apply it. 

Our wag'on and machinery paints, from the more common colors to the finest ver- 
milion, are specially desirable. 

Our fire-prooE roof, barn and bridge paint, manufactured from oxide of iron, is the 
best and cheapest paint for the purpose that can be produced. 

Put up in i, i, I aud 5 gallon cans, and in barrels, sold hy the gallon. Send for 
sample card of colors and price list. Address, 

CAriFOKSTIA PAIPTT COMPANY, 
July 13. 329 MARKET STREET, San Francisco. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH, 

Successors to John Cr. Uodgrc <& Co., Statiouers, Booksellers 
and Importers, Blank Book Maniifaeturers and Commercial Printers, 327, 320 
and 331 SANSOME STREET. Special attention given to the Stationery Wants of 
Banks, Insurance Offices, etc., and estimates promptly furnished upon request. 
[April 20.] 

FURTHER REDUCTION. 

THE SEATTLE C O A li , 

CHEjIPEM TMAM XSJE CBEAFESX. 

^" Ask Xoxtr Dealer for it. 

[June 22.] 

A GRADUATE OF A UNIVERSITY, 

Wbolioldsa State Teacher's Certificate, wishes to give pri- 
vate lessons in Greek, Latin, or Common School subjects. 
June 29. Address "J. R. B.," 1018 Washington street. 

W. Morris. Joa. Schwab. J. F. Kennedy. 

MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO., 

Importers and ]>ealers in Moldiu^s, Frames, En^i'aTliig^s, 
Ohromos, Lithon:raphs, Decalcomanie, Wax and Ai-tiats' Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 

NOTICE. 

For the very best photographs g-o to Bradley & Ralofsou's, 
in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 27, 1878. 



THEATRICAL, ETC. 



Baldwin's Academy of Music. —Tom Taylor's successful comedy of 
The Overland MotUc was produced at this house last Monday evetdng, con- 
siderably altered in structure and dialogue, and bearinj,' the new title, 
From tSingapore to Suez. It has always been a popular and mirth-provok- 
ing play, and the comical element in its present form is allowed full sway, 
greater prominence being given to the characters of "Mr. LtT bend" and 
the " two widowers," It is an incongruous production, however, abound- 
ing in extremes and presenting some of the best and at the same time 
worst work that ever emanated from its author's pen. The events on 
which he has founded his story are of the most simple and threadbare 
character, and yet he has so woven them together and infused so much 
life into his picture, as to create an interest and amusement alike unex- 
pected and enjoyable. Mere life on shipboard may be voted uncommonly 
dull by the majority of human beings; but seen across the footlights the 
miseries of "Mr. Lctvibond," the pedantry of "Sir Solomon," and bla- 
tant cowardice of "Major McTurk," in connection with the flirtations of 
" Mrs. Sebright," and the affair of " Tom Dexter and "Miss Colepepi er," 
pcss3ss a fajciuation rarely elicited by a comedy of this calibre. 

It lacks considerable finish ia its construction; and while it contains 
some capital bits of dialogue— such as the conversation of the two ladies, 
in the first act — some of the best points are spoiled by a striking disregard 
for the conventionalities of detail. For instance, at the time the occu- 
pants of the cabin are yet speculating as to the preserver of the 
"man overboard,"Tota Dexter appears, natty and neat, in a new uniform, 
looking as dry and unconcerned as if he had just stepped out of a band- 
box. He undertakes a second " lightning" change in the last act, when 
he swims off to the wreck, a mile dist;i.nt, to recover the lost papers and 
returns in a few moments. Again, the idea of " Major McTurk " chal- 
lenging " Mr. Lovibond " on board of a P. and 0. steamer, and, above all 
things, the aristocratic " Sir Solomon " carrying the message, is about as 
absurd as "Mr, H. M. Brown's " fatigue jacket, and the hunting crop he 
pei-sisted in carrying from first to last. As may be expected from the 
company now engaged at this house, the parts were generally well 6Iled, 
Mr. Mackay scoring another success as " Sir Solomon Frazer, K. C. B." 
The excellence of this conception was not duly appreciated until after the 
wreck, when the contrast between " Sir Solomon" in all his glory and 
" Sir Solomon" mns teeth, sans hair, was a chef d'ativre of the actor's art. 

Miss Kose Wood, as " Mrs. Sebright," made a great deal out of a some- 
what overwritten part. Miss Kate Corcoran found the part of " Miss 
Colepepper" too much for her, and wisely abstainpd from making any 
efforts to be otherwise than pretty, naive and reserved. She has, how- 
ever, caught the one particular weakness of Miss Rose Wood in her dress- 
ing, neither of them in this piece being suitably attired. Miss Rope Wood 
usually dresses as if she were about to have a new photograph taken, 
almost entirely disregarding the requirements of the character she is play- 
ing. Mr. Bishop made a good invot for the comical element of the piece 
to move upon. He was inexpressibly funny, and looked the part of a sea- 
ck rni-serahle. His " Mr. Lovibond" was a genuine success. 

Mr. H. M. Brown's Scotch accent was exceptionally good, and he played 
the part of "Major McTurk" with considerable si>irit, especially in the last 
act. The " Colepepper" of Mr. J. A. Herne was the weakest rendition 
in the cast, being badly conceived and worse acted, and dressed more in 
the style of an impecunious mountebank than an East Indian Commis- 
sioner. Mr. James O'Neil played the part of " Tom Dexter " in a manly, 
realistic spirit, entering into all the fun and taking an interest in the com- 
edy which was positively refresliing. Mrs. Farrcn made an excellent 
"Mrs. Lovibona, and Mr. Seymour — from long association with this line 
of character — a very good detective. Mr. Dayton had evidently tried 
his best with the scenery, but it fell short in many respects. Act 1, a 
very good interior of a mail steamer's saloon was marred by the attenu- 
ated aspect of the mast, which looked like a match placed on end. In 
act 2, he obtained a very pleasing general effect, but in detail was sadly 
(not) at sea. For instance, the mizenmast should not have three shrouds 
when the mainmast has but two ; neither are the P. and O. steamers fit- 
ted with a cabin front as rough and clumsey as one of the old colliers we 
see at the city wharves unloading coal. The '* Ghuzul " sung by Miss Alma 
Saville, iu the native Hindostahee, was no more like a native Hindoo 
song thau the lady herself a Nautch girl. Next Monday Mr. J. H. Stod- 
dart makes his appeai-ance in the drama of the Long Strike. 

Busla Street Theater. — Tony Pastor's troupe have presented a veiy 
excellent programme, with several novelties and some revivals which will 
certainly bear repetition. Miss Kitty O'Neil, a clog-dancer, has by her 
charmingly modest demeanor and superior excellence of her dancing won 
her way into the hearts of her audiences, and] well deserves the rounds of 
enthusiastic applause she receives nightly. As a dancer she is almost the 
best we have ever seen, and possesses a greater variety of steps than the ma- 
jority of performers. She changed her step thirty-four times in one dance 
(scarcely repeating the same step more than twice) on Monday evening, 
a faat of physical endurance truly remarkable. Mr. Kennedy, as a ven- 
triloquist, has made his mark by his wonderful powers and fund of humor. 
His " Sweet Johanna" has already become as popular as the unfortunate 
"Baby Mine," and the comicalities of his little Irishman nightly elicit 
roars of laughter. " Sweet Johanna" is a strange sample of what a plagia- 
rist can do; it is the "Last Rose of Summer," note for note, the time 
changed from three-quarter to common and the tune itself played quicker ; 
under these circumstances it is safe to say that it completely loses its iden- 
tity. This week Miss Vickers and Mr. Rodgers have doue some excellent 
work, the best imitations being those of MoCuUough, Barry Sullivan and 
Rose Eytinge. That of Barrett might have been improved upon, his act- 
ing being replete with mannerisms and his enunciation so affected that it 
is naturally more easy to imitate than that of a more common-place actor. 
Bryant and Hoey's performance is very good, their repertoire being some- 
thing-marvelous. Thegymnasticexerciseofthekickersisexceptionallygood, 
but after three weeks without change necessarily palls upon the audience. 
The Four Muldoons," a new act this week by the Kernells, Ellis and 
Watson, was the weakest number that has been presented at this house- 
yet. Barry, in his specialties, continues to convulse his audience with his 
laughable excentricities. His "Tricks on Amateurs" with Mr. Frnnk 
Girard was excessively funny. The Irwin sisters appeared in a new song 
aud dance entitled " On Board of the Mary Jane," which lacked novelty 
and life ; they also assisted Barry in oue of his sketches. Tony Pastor 
continues to impose himself upon his audience with his miseraljle motto 
songs and abominable claptrap. 



The grand sparring and wrestling entertainment to-night, at' 
Piatt's Hall, promises to be the first really respectable affair- of the kind 
ever held in San Francisco. Many of our best citizens are interested in 
the matter, and are determined that, as an athletic exhibition, it shall be 
one to be proud of. The great feature of the evening will be, of course, 
the set-to with gloves, between Harry Mayniu-d and Pati*y Hogan, but 
there is also a collar and elbow match on the progi-amme between Horner'^ 
Lane and Tom Fox, besides four other glove matches and an exhibition 
by Louis Richards, the champion club swinger. 



An exceedingly well contested s^Tuiuning match took place on 
Saturday afternoon, July 13th, between some lady patrons of the Mer- 
maid Baths. The course was about fifty yards, and the struggle for the 
first prize, a gold medal, which lay between the Misses Searight, was e.^- 
citing. Miss Maud won the race, with Miss Sophie Searight a splendid 
second, the latter securing for her prize a season ticket. Tlie third prize, 
a bathing suit, was captured by Miss M. Kennedy. Quite a large crowd 
collected to witness the match. 



California Theater.— X»{jo?omac(/ has held its own this week with un 
failiug success, its deservedly high reputation as a modern play of une- i 
qualed merit having drawn crowded and appreciative audiences. Mr. 
Montague has recovered Irom his unfortunate hoarseness, and the piece 1 
runs with an easiness and continuity only obtained where the principal 
actors are so well known to each other, and of such unquestionably ster- 
ling merit. It is likely to hold the boards for some time yet. 



The ever popular Miss Marian Singer will sing at the Chnrch of St. 
Ignatius, on Market street, Sunday, at 10:30 a, u. There will be a Grand 
High Mass, at which some excellent music will be given. 

Krug Champagne.— Private Cuvee, in quarts and pints; Shield— 
Krug^ — in quarts and jjints ; Premiere Qualite, in quarts and pints. For 
sale by Hellman Bros. & Co., comer Front and Jackson. 

A Grerman passing along Montgomery street yesterday refused to bay 
a telephone, for the reason he could not understand English. 

I IIIMM— ^»^^— — ■ I m ■ —■! ■!■■■■■■ ■—■■■! ■■!■ ■!■ 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE. 

Thirteentli IndtistTial Exhibition, San FranoiseOi Cal.» 1S13. 

The niaiiag:er>4 have the houor to announce to the Pnblie 
that the THIKTEKNTH GUANO EXmBITION OF SCIENCE, ART AND IS- 
UUSTRY, given under thu auspices of the Mechanics' Institute, wilt open at the Pa- 
vilion, on Market, Eighth and Mission streets, on Tuesday, August 13tb. 

Great and un usual "attrautions will be presented to visitors. Mining, At^ricultural 
and other Miichiiierj- will be in motion. Pacific Coast Manufactures, Minerals and 
Pruducts of the Soil n-ill be fully represented, beside many new and inieresting nov- 
elties never before exhibited on this Coast. 

The Art Oepartnient will be under the supervision of the San Francisco Art 
Association, a guarantee for excellence and completeness. Local Art will be specially 
represented, as also works of noted foreign artists, selected from the private galleries 
of this city. 

The Hortienltural Ciardeu, so popular heretofore, will be mode still more 
attractive this year ny the addition of many new features. 

The Mnsic."Each afternoon and evening afirst-ckvss Instrumental Concert will 
be given by the best soloists and aca>mplished musicians of this city, with a daily 
change of programme of the best and most popular music. 

No expense or pains will be spared by the Management thot vdU add to the com- 
fort or convenience of visitors. 

Applications forspace or information can be obtained from the Secretary, at the 
office, 27 Post street. IRVING M. SCOTT, President. 

J. H. CiTLVER, Secretary. [July 20.] J. H. GILMORE, Superintendent. 



GRAND SPARRING AND WRESTLING ENTERTAINMENT 

Will lHkC|>lHceat VBatrs]£all.!^aCiirjlay Eveuin;;, July 27, 
Ibis, betwceu ;M. uX'i'NNi.>R, of Ciiic-ago, and FUANK CUt.HJKETr, ..f San 
Francisco ; JOHNNY MULHOLLAND, of New York, and ERANK LESLIE, of San 
Francisco; JOHN BLAOKEY, of New Yort, and GEORGE ARMSTRONG, of Vir- 
ginia Citv ; BILLY UAVIS. of San Francisco, and JIM WHITE, of Boston. There 
will he a Collar and Elbow Match between UOMbR LANE, of New York, and TOM 
FOX, of Canada. LOUIS RICHARDS, the Champion Club Swinger, will pt-rfomi. 
There will he a grand displav of science between Prof. HARRY M AYN^VRD and Prof. 
P. J. HOGAN, for the Champion Belt of Middle Weight of California. Mr. Bennett 
and Mr. Thos. Chandler have consented to act as Judges. July 27. 

BUSH STREET THEATER. 

(Charles E. liOCke, Proprietor.— Crowiteil Xi^htly with Aa- 
j dicnces composed of our Best Families. Every Evening and Saturday Matinee. 
Special Novcltj' Progrsimme No. 3 of TONY PASTOR'S Grand and Uncquafed Vande- 
viUe Troupe, surpassing in attiuctiveness all previous entertainmentt of this Com- 
pany. Every Artist in a new Specialty. Positively no Old Acts Repeated. Electric 
and instantaneous popularity of Tony Pastor's new local song, IN A MINE (Baby 
Mine) , in which he describes the hopes, fears and despair of unsuccessful speculatiLin 
in Silver Stocks. The Four Muldoons. The Millineri. Ventriloquism. Street 
Thespians. Three Hours of Delightful Amusement. Next week, positively last week 
of the; Season. Iltserved Seats at Box Office to-day and everyday. July 27. 

BALDWIN'S THEATER. 

ThonaRS niagntre. Manager: Freil. Lyster, Actiugr Dfaiiasrer; 
G. B. Ohipman, Treasurer. Brilliant Success of the Great Comedy of Adven- 
ture, by Tom Taylor, Ksq., FROM SINGAPORE TO SUEZ, BY THE OVERLAND 
ROUTE. Saturday Evening, July 27th. Only Two Nights More. All the Company 
in the Cast. Act 1. Saloon uf the P. and O. Steamer Simoom— Morning. Act 2. 
Quarterdeck of the P. and O. Steamer Simoom— Evening. Act 3. The Wreck, the 
lt.Tit, and the Refujre— Night. Act 4. Tlic Coral Reef in the Red Sea— Sunrise. Sat- 
urday Matineo at 2 o'l^lock r M. Sunday Evening, July 2Sth— Special and Last Per- 
formance of FRO.M SINGAPORE TO SUEZ. Monday, July 29th-First Api>earance 
of MR. J. H. STODDARD. July 27. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Barton A I^awlor, Managers; Barton Hill, Acting Manag'er. 
Monday, July 29th, every evening during the week aud at Saturday Matinee, 

TITE J2£JGJ>'JJVG SJEKS^TIOy, 

Sardou's 
DIPLOMACY I DrPLOBEACY ! DIPLOIffACY I 

As presented by MR. H. J. MONTAGUE and his NEW YORK COMPANY. 
Q^ Seats at Box Office six days in advance. _^^__ _ _ July 27. 

MADAME JULIA MELVILLE SNYDER, 

^-| Q Mason street, between Bush an<l Matter.— Vocal Music 

\^ J_C3 for Oiiera, Concert or Parlor. Piano and Elocution. Dramatic Elocutioa 
and Voice Culture Specialties. Terms made known at residenec. May 25. 



July 27, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



PICT0RR 

The south of flowersandbeesaiulluve. 



TOUR 

A t1 liuty tiroam it itooniH to iiio. 

A :,'irri* sliiiht fi>rni, witli tlrajH-ry 

Soft, (linj^'ini.', hri>rht: njjirlVfiiir face I wonder if I care to road 

And all of ^■irlhmnVs changeful gnici'. UotwtHin the lines the Kates decreed: 

She is t«i> far I cannot sc« I wonder if I care to know 

What ctilor thone shy eyes may ho : If years shall hrintr her weal or woe: 

She \A so far I may not know I wonder— hut 'tis idle, she 

Whut nxse reil fancies bud and blow Is but a pictured fantasy : 

To |>AS!* the ^'atesnf her sweet mouth, And you, who ma»le the picture, amilo 

And with the breezed wuutheSouth — At my deluded ludns the while. 

— D. Q., San Fitmcisco, Cali/vrnia. 



MINE. 
Because I made her fair you ran to praise, 
Not looking underneath my tangled speech 
To seek /u-rstlf. You guessed the keruel sweet 
From seeing just the sun-side of the peach. 
And so you failed, as men are won't to fail 
In catching subtlest essence, threads of thought. 
A woman's fair — why ! that's enough, ymi think. 
And straightway come to hold the rest for naught. 
The silken splendor of her ruddy hair, 
The nut-brown eyes, the bloom of velvet cheek. 
Are charnJng^yes. but then, Pygmalion dear, 
'Tis wisest not fco let your statue speak, 
I meant a woman drenched in languorous grace — 
Just as a waking rose is steeped with dew — 
Stirring our pulses deep for love or hate ; 
Wearing, perhaps, a knot of fresh- plucked rue. 
You turn my fiame-hued canvass to the wall, 
Placing a neutral crayon sketch instead. 
Only a i>retty girl — like other girls — 
And lo ! she strikes my glowing siren dead. 

~Q. T., Bd/nont, California, 

DRESSMAKING AS A FINE ART. 
"We -wrere sauntering along Kearny street the other day, when, up 
, the wiudows of ililton Lathiim's beautiful Thurlow Block, we espied 
this legend: "Mi-s. Lewis' Dressmaking Parlors." Aa dress was the object 
of our rauihle, we immediately crossed over, and, taking the elevator, 
ascended to satisfy ourselves as to the beauty of this lady's establishment, 
of which we had often heard. There we found Mrs. Lewis, but not to 
speak to, some dozen ladies being seated patiently waiting their turn to 
be attended. So we looked around. The parlors in themselves are worth 
a visit, being full of artistic objects, Ijeautiful prints, pictures in oil, and 
crayon portraits adorn the wall; long mirrors reflect the lovely faces of 
the dress-loving ladies, and Mrs. Lewis' own beautiful work is scattered 
around. A doorway draped with lace and heavy green drapery showed 
within some forty assiatauts at work, and here and there were scattered 
the different articles of more than one fashionable trosseau; dresses in vel- 
vet, brocade, silk and lace, too lovely for anything, except to excite envy 
of the owners. After an hour Mi-s. Lewis gave us our turn, when we gave 
our order. It seeras astonishing, at this dull season, to see how con- 
stantly this lady is employed; but we cease to wonder when we find that 
she has her fashions from Paris twice a week, and that she also employs 
nothing but first-clr^s assistants. She is so well known that it seems su- 
perfluous to comment upon her style, yet we cannot help calling attention 
to her rooms. Mrs. Lewis pays the strictest attention to her orders, and 
holds herself responsible for the perfect fit of the dresses intrusted to her. 
The number of her rooms is 27 and 28 Thurlow Block, Kearney street. 



THE MacMAHON GRENADIER GUARD. 

The MacMahon Grenadier Guard, Captain John H. McMenomy 
commanding, gave their twentieth annual tai-get excursion and i>icmc at 
Fairfax Park, on Thursday last, entertaining the Unions as their guests 
to a target match, and presenting the company with an elegant gold 
medal, most tastefully designed and bearing an appropriate device. The 
MacMahons joined in the practice, but on account of the unfavorable na- 
ture of the atmosphere the shooting at the range of 200 yards was not 
equal to foinner occasions. The highest score of the TJnions was made by 
Captain Fritz, who fairly won the handsome prize, which he received at 
the hands of Captain McMenomy, who modestly though effectively ad- 
dressed the company. A new feature was introduced in the entertain- 
ment, of allowing the citizen guests to fire at the target, some of whom 
made very good practice. Among those present we noticed J. Lucas, 
San Rafael; Jacob Deeth, Colonel A. Newman, of the Governor's staff; 
Captain Foster, Senator Donovan and John Martin, of San. Francisco. 



The greatest luxiury during a hot spell is indubitably a good sea 
hath, and it is only recently that this pleasure has been, in our reach. Mr, 
R. Haley has filled the vacuum by opening the Terrace Sea Baths, at the 
foot of Webster street, on Central Avenue, at Alameda Beach. Our best 
citizens constantly take a trip over there oa the steamer Newark, which 
lands them at the baths in thirty-fi.ve minutes, or by the C. P. E,. E-. to 
Mastic Station, or from Oakland by horse-cars to within two blocks of 
the Terrace. The cost of a bath, including private room, bathing suit, 
towels, shower-baths, and all other adjuncts of a perfect bath, is only 
twenty-five cents, and one great charm of these sea baths is that there is 
plenty of water at all tides, as the baths are inclosed in coffered dams, 
perfect security and the best possible accommodation for both ladies and 
gentlemen, either in parties or alone and unattended. A bath at Ala- 
meda is now en regie. 

Harvard Honors to Califomians.— On Harvard College Commence- 
ment Day, June 21st, the following degrees were conferred on students 
from this State: In the Law Department, degrees of L.L.B. on. James 
Herrmann, A.B., L, J. Madden, A.B., Eomanio Soto, A.B. In the 
Academic Department, degrees of A,B. on Henry B. McDowell, Ogden 
Mills, George M. Pinney and H. E. Teschmacher. In the Post Gradu- 
ate Course, degree of A.M. on Harold Wheeler, A.B. This is the first 
degree of A.M. ever conferred by Harvard on a native Californian. The 
recipient is the son of our intelligent and worthy fellow- citizen, Alfred 
Wheeler, a San Francisco lawyer and one of the argonauts of *49. The 
honored Harold is not yet 21. Bright son! happy fatherl 



Few men have lived among ua so long and few men have been 8uch 
Kteady worUei-s among us iis H. M. Newliall. When on the Gth of July, 
1850, ho landed in San Francisco from the steamer Panamn, the field, al- 
though profitable, was narrow. But as the city spread he grew with her 
growth, and bocame rich with her aggrandizement. He was the nromoter 
of large works, whetlier public or private, himself entering into them with 
the earnestnes.^ that ever ensures success. His hair has grown gray, but 
his eve is as bright and his clear voice as far-reaching as in the days when 
San Francisco bi-gan at Jackson street and ended at Bush. 



The Kennedy "Seamless Glove" hixs apparently driven all other 
competitors out of the market. It is manufactured in all colors, from 
two to twelve buttons, and is in greater demand than any other glove in 
the market. The genuine article is marked 'Mlant Evangeline l,7i54 ; 
Kennedy Seamless. Medailles Paris — Londres." To be hicn chatL^ee and 
bicn iiantee is every lady's ambition, and to fulfill the latter obligation all 
that is necessary is to purchase your gloves of P. B. Kennedy, Glove man- 
ufacturer, 1'.yi Kearny street, between Sutter and 33ush. 



Harry N. Morse, ex-Sheriff of Alameda county, and welf-known as 
one of the bravest and most skilled detectives ever in the employ of the 
Government, lias opened a Collection and Detective Agency in the Safe 
Deposit building, No. 328 Montgomery street, lloom 12. He has an Oak- 
land branch in the Glascock building, under the management of Mr. A. 
B. Lawson, and, being independent of Government or municipal control, 
all legitimate business intrusted to him will be perfectly confidential 
and thorougld.y e.\ecuted. 

We are glad to know that our enterprising photographer, Mr. Kulof- 
son, has secured sittings from His Excellency the Chinese Embassador 
and suite. Immediately upon arriving they presented themselves at this 
popular establishment. This gentleman has received orders from the N. 
¥. Graphic and London Graphic. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Deutsche Spar mid I.eihbauk, Mo 526 California street, San 
Francisco. OtTiCERS : President, h. GOTTiG. Board of Directors.— Fred. 
Koeding, Chas. Kohler, Dan. Meyer, Edw. ifruse, George H. Eggerp, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L. Simon, Glaus Spreckels. Secretary, GEO. LETTE; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

MASONIC SAVIMGS AND LOAN BANK. 

lyro. 6 Post street, nCiisouic Temple, San Franelseo, Cal.— • 

Xi Moneys received on Term and Ordinary Deposits; dividends paid semi-annually; 
loans made on approved security. [March 2.] H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARAXTEE CAPITAI., 



$300,000. 

Officers: President, John Parrott ; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14. 



411 



FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Bnslistreet, above Kearny, O. mabe, Director. lioans 

made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Of&ce of the Hibemia Savings and liOan Society, 

M", E. Cor. Montg-omery and Post Streets, 
San JSrancisco, fTuly 24, 1S78. 

At a resrnlar meetiug' of the Board of Directors, Iield this 
day, a Dividend at the rate of 7^- per cent, per annum was declared on all De- 
posits for the six months ending July 21st, 1378, payable from and after this date, and 
free from FLderal Tax. [Jul^- 27.J EDW. MARTIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masoutc Savlngrs and I^oau Bank, No. 6 Post street. Ma- 
sonic Temple, San Francisco. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
Bank, held July W, 187S, a Dividend was declared at the rate of seven and one-half 
(7|) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and six and three-tenths (6 3-10) per cent, 
per annum on ordinary deposits, for the semi-annual term ending July 21, 1878, pay- 
able on and after July 25, 1878, free from Federal Tax. 
July 27^^ H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings aii<l X^oan l^ociety.*-For the half year 
ending June 30th, 1878, the Board of Directors of the German Savings and 
Loan Society has declared a dividend on Term Deposits at the rate of eight (8) per 
cent, per annum, and on Ordinary Deposits at the rate of six and two-thirds (ti-j) per 
cent, per annum, free from Federal Ta.tes, and payable on and after the 15th day of 
July, I87S. By order. [July 29.] GEORGE LETTE, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 5»3 California street, corner 
Webb.— For the half year ending with June 30, 1878, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of eight (8) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and six and two- 
thirds (6§) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, free of Federal Tax, payable on 
and after Tuesday, July 16, 1878. [June 29.] LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and liOan Society, 019 Clay street. --At a meeting of 
the Board of Directoi-s, held this day, a dividend, free of Federal Tax, of seven 
and one-half (7^) per cent, per annum, was declared on all deposits, for the term end- 
iuff June 29th, 1878, payable on and after July 15th, 1878. 
July 13. CYRUS W. CARMA.NY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. " 

French Savings and Loan Society, 411 Bush street.— The 
French Savintjs and Loan Society has declared a Dividend of seven and one- 
half (7^) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, for the half-year ending June 30, 
1878, payable on and after July 17th, 1878. By order. 
July A GUSTAVE MAHE, Director. 



f 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jxily 27, 1878. 



OUR EXTRACTOR. 

From City and Country Press. 



Several grain stacks have licen bnrnrd in Tolo cdnriiy, becanse, it is be- 
lieved, ol* Uie employment of C\\\neee.—Buufa Monica OuUook.^^Some Sandwich 
Island wlu'Ht is hpiii-r inierd in Siinia Barbara comity. It is reported ae etauding 
eleven feet hiiih.—Jb -^The >Sa7i/a Baibara Free Press ppeaks very liiglily of 
olive oil made in that Btction. It iy pronounced by connoi^sell^8 to be a fine arti- 
cle, poFseesing an a^irecable taste and fine fluvor.^^We notice the arrival of i^ey- 
eral threshcra Jor farmere of thlti vicinity. Already a large amonnt of grain has 
been threshed, and the reenltB so far perm to be eatipfactorv, noi witbstandins the 
appearance of rust in our f\.c\Af-.— IloUhiUr Aclvonce.^^A tradition psietti among 
the old Spanish eettlers that there is an immeneply valuable silver ledge on Mt. 
Konokti.— Xow.TrXoA'^i?»W«/in,^^Scvcral vaUiable deposits of chrome iron are 
known to esict in Lake County.— 7i.^^The Saiinas Judex Ihiv'kB that farmers in 
that va'ley will not average half a crop of wheat, owing to the genera! appearance 
of rust..— The A'tm Vowfy Gazette says: The wheat crop of this valley ie very 
flne, the lowtPt estimate of the yield we have heard being twtntv-eight bushels- per 
acre. We have heard of bni two email spots where the rn.-^t made its appearance ; 
and it really did no damage, as it appeared too late.— New wheat is arriving in 
South Vallejo in large quantitiet- dtnWy.— Solano y?mt*.^^The grain crop of S:ilt- 
rivcr Valley is variously estimated at from nine to fifteen million prnndt^. — Ytnna 
Sc7iti7i€l.^—T\\f- Petalvma Courier reijori^ that there it plenty (if work in ihat 
vicinity for dairy and farm hands ^^A vein of roal has been lonnd recently on 
Pope Creek, Napa County.- ZqA'<? JJef.— The Gnat Eastern Qiiickrilver Mine, 
four miles north ol Gncrnville, is lurming to its fnll capacity, turning out four 
flasks per Cny.—Sacramfnto Record- Union ^— The Najm Hepmltr says that eynip 
is being made in that valley from the juice of the grape.— —The Zo*Uflffe/es J/tr- 
7W sajs there ii* a banana plant, of the F'orida variety, growing In that neighbor- 
hood, which meat^nres at the base forty-two inches in circumfireDce.— The Tcm- 
escal tin mines, of San Bernardino eoiiiity. have hcen bonded to German capital- 
ists for $1 ,500,000.- .S'a/i^G Monica Ovitoo/c.^—T\ie Marysville Appeal Boderetands 
from several Sutter county fainiers, who have thret-hi d their crops, lhat the yield 
per acre is much lesp than eelimatid. It averages from ten to twelve bushels to 
the acre. -^Fruits of Norlliern Sonoma never yielded more rihnndanlly n<ir were 
of better quality than this year.— Russian Jiixer Flag. ^— Lake county will ihie 
year harvti-t half a grain erop. All the late sown wheat is more or le^s affected 
with ruet. The army woim, now i lUicting CoUiea and Yolo rounti^, is destroy- 
ing the corn, potatoes and cabbage.— Pf^fi/?/ma Argvs.^— There are about one 
hundred and twenty thousand sheep now grazing in Alpine connty.— Alpine Av- 
alancke.^^SevcTal flvlds of Egyptian corn in this county are promising well. — 
Fii-'O^w Z'tr/^rt.^^Haying has commenced in Honey Lake Valley, Lassen county, 
and the farmers are therefore quite buf^y.—XflSwn .4droco^e ^—Farmers tell us 
that grain is turning out belter than thi.y expected.— TT'in^^r* ..^t/r&ea^e.^— The 
water supply at Dutch Flat, Placer county, is failing fast. The mines will all be 
shut down, it is thought, in a month or six wcvli^.—DvCckMat Forvm -^A Wat- 
sonville corretpondent of the Santa Crvz Sentinel saysr Wheat will probably 
yield a little more than half a crop in this valley. Potatoes are splendid, and cats 
and barley ditto. There is some growling that beans are dying off.^^The Benicia 
New Era reports that the run of salmon is " played out.'' Fishermen have ceased 
to fish, and the canneries have shut clown. -^Therc have been twice as many fires 
in the grain Ce'ds this year as we have ever had in any one year in this State. The 
early farmers on the plains always plowed two strips around their fields and 
buined between. Would it not be well to take some such precaution now?— 
Colvsa Svn .^— The success attending the artesian well project of the railroad com- 
pany at Tipton is the mos-t encouraging step yet taken toward the cultivation and 
settlement of a great tract of dry country lying between the mountains and the 
lakes.— :Sof/ (Ac rn Cali/ornian.—The Santa Clara Echo says that in the vicinity of 
Lick's mill, north of town, there are a dozen cr more cork trees, the same as those 
from the bark of which comes the cork of commerce. ^^We are informed, upon 
good authority, that the Soquel beet sugar factory will be removed to tbePajaro 
valley nest aeaeon. — 7ra/s&?(?)itfe Transcript.^— The Silrer State says the grass- 
hoppers have stormed and taken Winnt-mncca.-^— The Oold Hill News statr-s that 
the Cometoek community is still crowded with men seeking employment.*^— It is 
reported that a thirty-foot vein of bitumcnous coal has been found eoutb-n-est of 
Battle Mountain. — TeiTitorial En ttrprise. "^The Railroad Company has reduced 
its freight charges from Mound City to Yuma.— 5a?j. Bernardino Tiiius.^—We 
understand that a project is on foot for forming a company to work some very 
rich claims in Holcomb Valley. These claims have paid enormously in the past, 
but have been abandoned on account of water. The plan seems to be on a solid 
fonndation.— 76.^— The Santa Rosa Democrat estimates the loss of sheep last 
year in Mtndocino and Humboldt counties at fully fifty per cent.^^The suspen- 
sion of the Sierra Flume and Luraher Co., at Reel Bluff, Tehama county, throws 
one thousand men out of employment.— A'trn t'owm?-.^— Nearly all the wheat of 
Fresno county is being shipped to Stockton,— iZi —An apparently inexhausiible 
subterranean water supply has been struck near Tipton, iu San Joaquin Valley, at 
a depth of 2S0 toeX.— Foothill Tidings.-^— The Fruit Canning Company at Santa 
Rosa will, this season, if they can obtain the fruit, put up lOO.HOO cans for market. 
— i6.'^— The silt from the mines is. in some places, being systemiilically used to 
make agricultural lands. In about three years this land is sufliciently settled and 
ripened to make good gardens, orchards and vineyards. Some of the riche.'-t soils 
for garden and orchard purposes between Placerville and Coloma are of this 
" made boW''— Sacramento ite.— — A farmer in this vicinity anticipated a yield of 
three hundred sacks of barley, but realized four hundred and fifly. The crops of 
several others have brought surprises equally ^\e^B»jii.~Gilroy Advocate. 

THE SEA-SERPENT CAUGHT AT LAST. 

Editor News Letter— Sir: After all that has been said and unsaid, 
believed and ridiculed about " the sea-serpent," the following- announce- 
ment, just received by the mail, seems to set the question of its existence 
at rest. Whether it is an ophidian or not matters little if it be borne in 
mind that every one who has reported having seen "the sea-serpent " has 
described the mane on tJie neck; and considering that this one is either a 
young one or one of a smaller species, the proportional size of mane is 
remarkable, those previously reported having shown at least forty feet 
out of water, while this has a length of only fourteen feet. There is a 
common remark among English scientists that when anytliing is particu- 
larly wanted it is sure to turn up in Australia. Tasmania is not exactly 
Australia, but there is the plainest evidence that it once was a portion of 
the main land. The granite rocks and small islands which stud that por- 
tion of Bass Strait, and continue for a great distance parallel to Tasma- 
nia, down to the Penguin, are clear evidence of this. The "fisb-pools"* 
alluded to are very numerous on the coast and large, formed in the decay- 
ing rock. John J. Bi.easdale, D. 1). 

The Launceston correspondent of the Bohart Toivn Mercury writes as follows un- 
der date of Saturday last; "Messrs. Macnamara and Audliug arrived by the steam- 
ship Deron to-day, bringing a most remarkable fish, captured in a fish-pool at Pen- 
guin. The fish is 14 feet long, 15 inches deep from the ncik to the bolly, tapering 2 
mcbes to the tail, and S inches in diameterat the thickest place. There are no scales, 
but the skin is like polished silver, with 18 dark lines and 8 rows of spots running 
from the head to the tail, on each side. There ia a mane on the neck 20 inches long, 
and continuous from the bead to the tail; small head, no teeth, protrusive mouth, 
capable of being extended 4 inches, like a sucker; eyes flat, about the size of a half- 
crown, and bke silver, with black pupils. There are two feelers under the chin, 32 
inches long. The fish was alive when captured, and is on view at the Mechanics' In- 
stitute, labeled ' Sea-Scrijeul.' Numbers of peonle have inspected it, but none are 
able to assign the species." Our contemporary, referring to the capture, says: "All 
that 13 required now is that Prof. MeCoy should be allowed to examine the'fish and 
supply one of his remarkably lucid reports, similar to those he has prepared con- 
cerning Tasmaniau salmon." , 



INSURANCE. 



St. Paul F. & M. Ins. Co. ..St. Paul, Mini 

Home In3. Co Columbus, Ohi 

La Caisse Generale Ins. Co.. Paris, Fianfic 



FIRC, I,IFE AND 3IARINE. 

INSURANCE AGENCyIiUTCHINSON & MANN, 

Ko. 314 California Slieet, San Francisco- 
Capital Hepresented $11 ,860,00l| 

Girard Ins, Co Philadelphia, Pa. | People's Ins. Co Newark, N. . 

Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. "■'■■■"-"- ~ . . ^ ■ ... 

New Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Texas 

Trade Ins. Co Camden, N. J- 

[March 30.1 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, $38,789,0651 

Imperial Fire Insurance Company , Of Londo] 

London Assurance Corporaticxi Of IiOndon^ 

Northern Assurance Company Of Ijondon. 

Queen Insurance Company Of Liverpool, 

A. Joint I*olicy Issued, by the JFeitv Companies. 

W. liAME BOOKER Ag^cnt and Attorney^ 

KOBEBT BICKSON Manager. 

July 13. 317 California St. , San Francisco, 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Principal Office, 406 Caliluruia Street, Snu Francisco^ 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1877, fC9y,291 ; Liabilities, !;5,9r>2 ; Surplus for Poliqr 
Holders, ¥os*J,339. 0. F. Houghton, President; Geo. H. Howard, Vice-President 1 
Charles K. Story, Secretary. K. H. MAGILL, H. H. bIGELOW, General Agents. 
i>iitECTOR8.— San Francisco — Geo. H. Howard, John H. Redington, J. F. Houghtoi 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Currey, L. L. baker, W. F. Whittier, C. C. Burr, ' 
M. Root, W, H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood, George S. Mann, Cyn 
Wilson, W. T. Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Eotaling, A. Block, A. K. P. Harmoi 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Lodge, Charles R. Story. Ah 
meda County Branch — V. I>. Moody, Cl.aur.cy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Fa 
relly, Josejih B. Marlin, "W. B. Hardy, T. B. Simpson. San Dioi;o— A. H. Wilco: 
Sacramento— Mark Hopkins, D. W. Earl, Julius W etzlar, Jcmes C'arolnn. San Josf 
T. Lllard Btans, B. 1). Alurphy, A. Pfibter, J. H. Dilble, J. S. Carter, Jackion Le _ 
Jacob Kith, John Auzerais, John Balbach. Stockton— H. H. Hewlett. Chas. Beldin] 
J. 1). Peters, A. W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marys,viIIe— 1>. E. Knight. Gra 
Valley— Wm. Watt, T. W. Sigourney. Portland, Oiegui— W. S. Ladd, C. H. Lewi 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, 1). Macleay. Virginia City, Nevada — John Gillig,Ui 
L. Requa- March 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.-UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California I^loyds.— Establisbed iu 1861,— ITos. 416 an^i 
41S Califonua street. Cash capital $750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed $1,000,000' 
Coin. Fair Rates! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS.!; 
—San Fkancisco— J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Cotmor, R. S. Floyd, JIoi 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, Antoine Borel, Charles Kohler, Joseph Sell 
I. LawTence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandcnstein, Charles Bauni, James Moflitt, Ei 
ward Cadwalader, Benjamin Brewster, L, Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Li 
ning, John Parrott, L. A- Booth, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Bartlett Doe, Gustai 
Touchard, J. H. Baird, J, G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Ducouimun, Wni. Scholh 
John Conly, I. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, J. 0. Eldridge, A. B. Phipps, Jas. M. GoeweyS 
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Chari.ES D. HiVEN, Secretary. Geo. T. BoHE^*, Surveyor. July 28. 



THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 



FIU£ A?ro IH[ARI:N£. 



Clasli Agsets, 9450,000. — Principal Office, SIS and S20 San4 
J some street, San Francisco, Officers : — A. J. Brvast, President ; RiciiAai)>i 
IvBRS, Vice-President ; Charles H. Cusni.vo, Secretarj- ; H. l-I. Watson, Marin^ 
Sun-eyor. Board of LUrectors :— Peter Donahue, James Ir\-ine, C. D. 0'Sullivanj;i 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Hajrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George O. i 
McMuIlin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. BuiOvley, 
P. J. White, E. M. Rout, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld, Daniel r 
Callaghan. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Do^\■ney, Los Angeles. Wm.;> 
Hood, Sonoma Coun ty. H. W. Scale, Majiield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. l6i ji 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL UFEJNSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Has transacted the business of liife Insurance for nearly) 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to overFoi^RTKLs Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com-' 
paiiy, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the O.n'lv Com-, 
pajiy on the l*acific Coast governed by Uie Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has eomr>'Jed with the new Insurance Laws of Califoniia. ^ 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. tl.'\ 328 Montgomery street, 



THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, orznrich. Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 fiiincs ; Baloise, of Basle. Capital 5,000,000 franca 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severailj' fur all losses that may be sus- 
tained. Losses made pavable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English ixiliey, our Campanics will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to Engliiih jurisdiction. 
June 9. HENRY BALZER & CO., Agents, 213 Sansome st., S. F. 



BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

("iapital 85,000,000.— Agents: Balfonr, Cntbrie & Co., ITo, 
J 230 CalUornia street. San Fraiiuiseo. No. 18. 



THE THAMES AND KERSEY MARINE INS. CO., LIMITED. 



June. 1. 1 



E. N. HOOPEE, Agent. 

Office : SOS Califot~nia Street. 



MORRIS SPEYER. 

lire and Marine Insurance Agent, 307 California street* 

Dwelling, 507 Post street. January I, 1873. Jan. 12. 

CHARLES LE GAY, 

American Commissiv-^ iilcrclianl, - - 1 Rne Scribe, Pteris. 



F- 



July 27, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKUTISEU, 



LA DEBUTANTE. 

Blonde, barely eiK'tiU'eii, and bowitching 

Wliftt w.nultT litT face is the ra^rf ; 
Time wiwt when she toitc-d At her stitehing, 

Witli uev«r u th'tu^^lit of the stii^e— 
Time Wiw when the dreams were quiesoent, 

That foreed to tlie footlights at Uxnt ; 
Ah! how does the life of the preseut 

Recall the desires of the past. 
She'll hear exdamutinuH of rapture 

When {,'raciiii,' the CapMlets' ball; 
And Claude will rejoice iu her capture, 

A Pauline ^urpaf^iin^' them all. 
The fairent of fair L:uly Tejizlea — 

A pitfKunti and bri^jht Lady Gay ; 
She'll front the competitive easels, 

To win the line honors in May. 
She'll be, as the phrase runs, the fxshion. 

And lover's will Hock to her feet, 
A heart that so well can fcis:n passion. 

May well find the real vows sweet. 
Since true love <if all lovea is rarest, 

And fickle and fulae loves are rife, 
May that nile be ever the fairest 

She plays in the drama of life. 
What warfare she'll cause, competition 

'Mid hoys who have posies to throw; 
*Tis Aldershot's highest ambition 

A ponular actress to know. 
What jealixiay, oft she feeU certain 

'Twill end in the crossing- of swords; 
The pieces behind the green curtain 

Outrival the plays on the boards. 
The "fierce liirlit that beats on a throne" is 

No fiercer than that on the stage; 
A life that's as pure as her own, is 

Not safe from the sneers of the age: 
And htve may be rival to duty, 

And scandal make free \vith her name ; 
For thiipe will bend low to her beanty 

Whose smiles are an omen of shame. 
Yet «rt« a brave self-reliance 

Beams forth from those clear watchet eyne. 
An earnest of utter defiance 

To au^ht that is false or malign. 
Her steps may be shadowed by sorrows. 

Her feet tread a wearisome way, 
But still throu^ the coming to-morrows 

Her heart shall be pure as to-day. 
We'll bid her adieu then, presaging- 

Fair fate for the future to-uight. 
She'll play in a piece needs no staging, 

A raft that her own is by right. 
That piece shall be "Home," with its gladness — 

The part that of dutiful wife. 
To run till, in silence and sadness, 

The curtain rings down on her life. 

— Piccadilly. 

LETTER FROM PERU. 

liiMA, May 28th, 1S78. 

Editor News Letter— DeaeSik: Keenly enjoying your regularly re- 
ceived godsend-in -print. I enclose you an extract from the Coniercio of 
yesterday, with a translation into English: 

TRANSLATION. 

I cannot refrain from informing- you, that the public may know it, of a scandalous 
act that took pkce yesterday iu tha Church of the Recoleta. 

Dr. Pa203, chaplain of that church, on account of illness, entrusted the nine- 
oViock-niass to a priest who offered for it, asking the pay of two soles and forty 
cents. Yesterday he spoke with this object to the priest, Mr. Manuel Earran; and 
the church being- filled with people, the sacristan went out and announced that 
there would be no mass. 

The L'ongregatiou were sttrprisel, and as Mr. Earran was goinp;- out, commenced to 
withdraw, when a gentleman inquired the meaning of this hoax on the public, and 
the sacristan replying that it was the refusal of the priest referred to, who was not 
willing to perform the mass for two soles forty cents, for not less than three soles, 
the gentleman referred to paid the difference of sixty eeuta, and Mr. Earran, seeing 
his demand satisfied, returned from the street to say mass. 

I refer to you this act without comment, since society will know how to judge 
properly such & scandal. I am, etc. 

Lima, May iGt/t, 1878. 

It appears worthy of record, as serving to illustrate better times in 
Peru and the firmness of htdders even of objects of luxury. 

The priest who refused to *' eat of his body and drink of his blood " for 
less than the fair market price of three Peruvian dollars, is no slouch. 
The next thiag you know the public will be offering a dollar and forty 
cents for /sealing miracles. One must respect the position taken by this 
pastor, which is virtually: " If you folks want to chew on the Lamb, you 
must pay a fair price, for FU see you all anthricitically d— d before I'll 
lunch at nine o'clock in the morning for two dollars and forty cents." 

Observe also the deep piety of one of the i!ock, who wouldn't let a mat- 
ter of sixty cents separate A wa from his Jesus. This capitalist is a dar- 
ing operator, and realized promptly that a cold collation for an entire 
congregation— wine included— was dog cheap at the money. 

If parsons in America would but emulate the pattern of the Lima 
priest, we would soon see church debts squared. An honest preacher 
would set out his dainties and tell his congregation: " Here's your lamb, 
crumb and gravy, but devil a soul will get a taste until I get a new hat 
out of the money you owe me. Settle up or I'll put your maker back 
in the cupboard." Your Occasional CoBRESPoJfDENT. 



An Elinois man, with a foresight worthy of a better cause, popped 
the question on a railroad train, and now the maiden is at a loss to decide 
as to which county she had better commence proceedings in for a breach 
of promise. 



STOCK BROKERS. 



K. S. Latham. LATHAM & KING, Homer S. Ejog. 

Sui>c«MHorM to Jntuca II. Lntliaiii A 4'4>., No. 31*i Pino Ntreet, 
Stock and Money Brokers. Stocks bought and carried on margins. July la. 

Dakibl Z. Yost.] |.I. \V. Bueciusiuhuk, Member S. F. Eoard. 

BRECKINRIDGE & YOST, 

Stock Brokvi'M, UUI Moiitj^uiiivry Ht, [March 10. 

SURRU'UOO CiLLAOUAX.] [jRaSMUII LVNCU. 

CALLAGHAN, LYNCH & CO., 

Stock Brokers, No. 509 California Street, San Francisco. 

[April -^T^^l 

GBO. C. H2CR0X. 



GEORGE C. HICKOX & CO., 



E. C. McFARTjAKR. 



Clomnilssioii Stock Brokers (Sim FrHiiclsiCO Stock Ex- 
/ change, No. 230 Moulgomery street, San Francisco. May 4, 



J. M. Walkke. 



Jkksisgs S. Cox. 



Alexasder Austin. 



S' 



J. M. WALKER & CO., 



tock Brokers, NortUtvest coruer Sloutj^'Oiucry and Pino 

treets, San Franeiaco, March 30. 



B. Boswell. 



S 



S. B. BOSWELL & CO., 



D. 0, Bates. 



tocl£ Brekers, Xo. 31S Cnliforuia street, Snn FrniiCBSCo. 

California March SO. 



THOMAS 60YS0N, AA. 0., 

(University of Copenhagen, Denmark), 
Ihy.siciaii aud Surgreoii. OtfKee anal Besideuce. 112 Kearny 

OHice Hours, 11 a.m. to 1 r.ii., and G to 8 P.M. Sundaj-, 11 to 1 only. 



Telephone in the i^liice. 



July J 



DR. HALPRUNER, 

SURGEON CHIROPODIST, 

Cures Corns, Bunions, Ing'roiving' Nails, etc. "So pay re- 
quired until cured. And without pain or lameness. Examination and Con- 
sultation Free. Mrs. H. will assist treating ladies. Office Hol-rs : From 1 p.m. to 
6 P.M., and 7 t« 9 P.M. ; Sunday, 11 to 1 p.m. ST. JAMES HOUSE, 

March ^3. OOG Market street, corner Ellis and Stockton. 

CHARLES I. HOLBROOK, M. D., 

Office and Besidence: St. Jamea Hou&e, 936 Market Street- 
[March23.J 



H 



DR. D. A. HILLER'S 

omeopathic Free Dispensary to the Poor, STo. 13 Bag-ley 

Place, off O'Farrell street, next Hammam Baths. Feb. l(f. 



o 



TO DENTISTS PHYSISIANS AND ARTISTS. 

ffiecs to Rent.— Tliose slenirable trout rooms ou first floor 

NUCLEUS HOUSE, facing Market, Third and Kearny streets. Apply to 
June S. MRS. E. U. WORTH. 

DR. O'TOOLE'S OFFICES 

Are moved from 906 Market street to California SaTlng-s 
Bank JBuildinR-, corner Market, Powell and Eddy streets. Entrance on Eddy 
s treet. July 13. 

GeoSchultz, SCHULT2 & VON BARGEN. H.YonEargen. 

Importers and Dealers in Wines, Branilies, Bourbon Whis- 
kies, and all kinds of Foreign and Domestic Liquors, southeast corner California 
and Front streets, San Fi-ancisco. April 13. 

J. C. MERRILL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, Aleuts for the Sand- 
wich Islands Packet Lines, 20i California street, S. P. April 13. 

L.nyiTwtm^ NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., M. Newton. 

Importers aud wholesale dealers iu X eas, Foreig^u Ooods and 
Groceries, 204 and UOtJ California street, San Francisco, Cal. May 25. 



Geo. Howes. 



GEO. HOWES & C0.3 



Jabez Howes. 



San Franclseo, California, Shippinj 
chants, and agents of Sutton & Co.'i 
New York aud Philadelphia. 



D. F. HUTCHINQS. 



aud Contmission Sler- 

Uispatch" Line of Clipper Ships from 
May 11. 



J. Sanderson. 



"TH. Ddnne. 

PHCENIX WORKS. 

Established 1850.— Mutchiug^s A: Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

Newton BooTn, C. T. Whkkler, Sacramento. | J. T. Glover, W, W. Dodge, S. F 

W. W. DODGE & CO. 

holesale Grocers, corner Front aud Clay streets. 



W 



Francisco. 



San 

April 1. 



ASHTON'S LIVERPOOL SALT. 

This celebrated brand of Salt has beeu in constant use for 
more than half a century in the Eastern States, where for dairy puriwses it 
commands double the price of any other brand of Liverpool Salt. The undersigned 
vre sole agentsbere, and offer it to the trade. WILLIAMS, BLANGHARD & CO., 
Jan. 5. 21S California street. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction in Price : Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price, 00 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 

H. S. Crocker. H. S. CROCKER & CO., JohnD.Toat. 

Stationers and Printers, No.^'s 401-403 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. March 9. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER A>'r> 



July 27, 1878. 



THE DISCONTENTED DONKEY. 

A Jackass, who earned an humble living by hauling a dray about the 
village where he dwelt, grew dissatisfied with his lot, and calling around 
him a number of his kind avho were in similar circumstances, he thus ad- 
dressed them : " My brothers, we have been long enough oppressed and 
trodden down in order that others may live in ease and plenty. Compare 
our condition with that of the Horses. We have to toil from dawn till 
dark in order to get a few straws to eat and a shed to shelter us. The 
Horses, on the contrary, earn by a daily canter, which is more a pleasure 
than a labor, the mcst elegant stables and abundance of grain and hay. 
They have everything and we nothing; which, as every Jackass knows, 
conclusively proves that the Hurses are hell-bound villains, grasping mo- 
nopolists, and corrupt thieves." The speaker was here interrupted by 
brays of "hemp! hemp!' which, in the hee-haw language, signifies 
"hear! hear!" " I propose, therefore," continued the speaker, "that we 
Jackasses unite in a party to be named the Odorless Excavator Haulers, 
and that in the exercise of our rights as unmitigated donkeys we proceed 
to burn down these sumptuous stables, kick the brains out of the Horses, 
and divide the grain and hay among ourselves in such portions as each 
may be able to scramble for." This pnipnsition was greeted with deafen- 
ing brays of approval. The long-eared audience went nearly mad with 
enthusiasm, and unanimously voted the speaker the greatest Jackass in 
creation. But their favor soon assumed a more practical shape than this ; 
each brou!,'ht some portion of his own scanty store of hard-earned straws 
and laid them at the feet of their leader. Thenceforward the great agi- 
tator's fortune was made. He ceased to haul the despised dray, and con- 
tented himself with repeating daily the above oration, which was on 
each occasion received with increased approbation. The straws fell thicker 
and thicker upon him, until his skin grew as sleek and his belly as round 
as the most pampered HorseV. It is true that the action of the Odorless 
Excavator Haulers was confined to the braying of awful threats ; and it 
is also true that the time they lost in catching the pearls of great price 
which fell from the lips of their President, as well as their contributions 
to the support of him and his cabinet, made them poorer than ever ; but 
what Jackass ^vith a soul would refuse to give a straw for a principle. 
The ptjsition of the Agitating Ass was now all that a reasonable Jack 
could desire, and had he been content to remain in his native village, he 
might have reveled in the straw of his less sagacious brethren. But the 
spirit of the noble beast was filled with a vast ambition. " If an out-of- 
the-way village," he soliloquized, " can thus afford to honor my genius, 
what might I not aspire to in the great cities? Behold, I will set forth on 
my travels." Certain of the pampered Hi>rses against whom the oratorical 
Moke had been most bitter, hearing of this determination, generously of- 
fered to carry him on his journey without price. But the lordly Pres- 
ident, for reasons best known to himself, preferred to let his poverty- 
stricken followers bear the expense, and, having squeezed them of sus- 
taining straws to the full extent of bis ability, he left them to fight it out 
as best they could, and departed towards the rising sim. On the way he 
was met by here a dozen and there a score of Jackasses who had heard of 
his fame {though the chronicler who was to record his exploits for a con- 
sideration made a dozen a hundred and a score a thousand), and, indeed, 
when he reached the great cities he at first received some notice. But he 
soon learned that local notoriety is much easier of achievement than na- 
tional celebrity. He found numberless Jacks who could beat him at his 
own game. What had been regarded as genius at home proved bare me- 
d:ocrty abroad. The erstwhile triton among minnows found himself a 
minnow among tritons, and, what was worse, the minnows at home had 
found other tritona for their bounty, so that our Jackass errant was in 
danger of starving. Disgusted and disappointed, he turned sorrowfully 
homewards, and arrived safely to find that his ancient glory had forever 
departed. Other orators brayed in his place, and took the straws that 
fell from the pot)r Jack's table. The envied stables were still unburned, 
the pampered Horses unbrained, the grain and hay undivided, and oxir 
crest-fallen prodigal was forced to back once more into the shafts of his 
dray, a sadder and a wiser donkey. 
MoEAL : Even a Jackass ought to know when he is well off. 



THE CALUMNIATED FOX. 

A Fox, who on account of his superior cunning and intimate familiarity 
with ways that are dark, bad been entrusted by the other animals \vith 
tbeotficeof bringing offenders to justice, fell into the habit of declining 
to prosecute those who were most manifestly guilty of breaking the laws. 
A Dog, who by reason of his supposed watchfulness and sagacity, had been 
appointed guardian of the four-footed community, found great cause of 
complaint in this ill-timed leniency. Quoth he: " Good Mr. Flood (for so 
was the Fox named), do you not know that— ahem — your conduct is, as it 
were, so to speak, singular? and that — really, you know — I have reason to 
suspect that your clemency is — er, if I may so express myself, not so com- 
pletely disinterested as it would be if It were more disinterested than it 
15 ?" (For it is to be noted that this particular dog never spoke out like a 
man — he couldn't, you see, being only a dog.) "If I understand you 
aright," retorted the non prosecuting Fox, "what you mean to say, Mr. 
Press (such was the canine beadle's title), is that I am an infernal thief, who 
lets criminals off for the consideration of a bribe. If yon can prove this, 
do so; if not, shut up. In the meantime remember that it was mainly 
through your recommendations that I was appointed to my present posi- 
tion, and rest assured that it will take more than your innuendoes to drive 
me from it." 

There are two morals to this fable. First: Beware of place-hunters. 
Second: Accuse boldly, or don't accuse at all. 



Friedlander's Successors. — The Post has a very incorrect editorial 
to the effect that Driesbackis to succeed the late lamented "Grain King." 
Nothing could be further from the truth. E. F. Bent & Co. , late employes 
of Isaac Friedlander, hope to secure their share of tlie grain business, the 
"Co." being no less than Lewis W. McGlaughlin, long engaged as grain 
expert. Then the freight and charter business of Friedlander falls to his 
old-time proteges, E. Emmett Doyle and Capt. Chas. Wilson, both long 
and most favorably known as attachiSs of our lamented friend. Success 
attend the new firms. 

■Wnenever you see an alleged literary man who prides himself on a 
high forehead, you can rely upon it he is able to keep the flies off it by 
simply flapping his ears. 



THE DESTRUCTION OF SIR CRACK-A-RIB. 

Mr. Beecher came down like a wolf on the fold. 
And his pockets were heavy with silver and gold; 
And the leer in his eye said as plain as could be: 
O, hey diddle-diddle, and diddle-dum-dee! 
Like piagans whose faith in their idol is green, 
Both the young and the old at B.'s lectures were seen; 
Like pagans whose faith in their idol has flown, 
The crowd very soon disaiipointed had grown. 
For the Demon of Fact spread his wings on the blast, 
And breathed on the lustful old Turk as he passed; 
And the eyes of his audience ogled their fill, 
And their hopes of their hero forever grew still. 
For there stood a satyr with lips thick and wide, 
Who the verdict of public opinion defied, 
And with mien better suited to cockpit or turf. 
Preached divinity cold as the rock-beating surf. 
And there sat the ladies distoi'ted and pale — 
Was the god of their fancy this ill-featured male? 
But the bald-heads all chuckled — they saw at a glance 
That if ke could seduce aught, they, too, had a chance. 
And the widows of Frisco were loud in their wail 
That the idol proved gross whom they thought only frail. 
And the fetish called Beecher fell down from the place 
Where he still might have reigned had he hidden his face. 

Byron. 



FALSE PROPHETS. 

Certain big and little American journals cannot conceal their satis- 
faction at the fact that the impeachment of Lord Eeaconsfield has been 
demanded in the House of Commons. By whom, and witli what chance 
of its being granted this demand has been made, are subjects upon which 
the editors of these joui-nals are discreetly reticent. It would greatly mar, 
nay, it would altogether ruin their pleasure to comment on the facts of 
their begged-for impeachment, for then it would be necessary to confess 
that the petition was conceived and fathered by an insignificant faction of 
radical lunatics, who have neither the respect of their fellow-members nor 
any consideration from the country at large ; it would be difficult, with- 
out appearing lamentably ignorant, to avoid acknowledging that the peti- 
tion for impeachment was as certain to be presented as was Sir Charles 
Dilkes amendment to the motion for the Duke of Counaught's marriage 
settlement — ^another subject, by the way, which seems t" greatly tickle 
our contemporaries. It was therefore much more plejisant and easy 
to call attention to the telegram by displayed head-lines, add a few sneer- 
ing editorial remarks, and then let the facts take care of themselves. The 
matter would, however, be quite unwt)rthy of notice were it not that some 
interest attaches to the last dying kick of American journalism at Eng- 
land's European policy. A demand for the Premier's impeachment by 
the "Foreign Affairs Association," whatever that is, afforded an o[)por- 
tunity for one more sickly jeer, and the chance was not tliruwn away. 
We are heartily glad that it was not. Surely, the scribes who have suf- 
fered so much in the noble cause of slandering the mother country deserved 
some trifling reward at last. In predicting the humiliation of England 
have they not had to swallow their own prophecies a thousand times? 
Have they not now the mortification of seeing the object of their hatred, 
or rather envy, come out of the difficulty " at the top oi the heap ':*' Have 
they not garbled facts and distorted dispatches with no other result than 
to show the world what ingenious liars malice can make of some people ? 
Ay, verily ! Who, then, will grudge them the satisfaction of a parting 
sneer at the statesman who has been the instrument of their martyrdom 
by falsifying their predictions and disappointing their hopes ? 

It would be in the highest degree amusing to hear some of our contem- 
puraries "explain awaj'" England's triumph, and their own annihilation 
as seers, or even as ordinarily sagacious forecasters of the future. How 
they would set about such a task is more than we can imagine, but doubt- 
less they would discover some efficient method of accomplishing it to their 
own entire satisfaction. Here is a fine opportunity for the young men 
who write editorials for our daily papers to display their sophistry, rea- 
soning powers and capability for invention. Let them drop poor Potter 
and the Workingmen, and fables about bonanzas on the ocean beach, and 
expend some of their surplus talent upon a vindication of their respective 
sheets. They have only to look through the riles of the past year to see 
what a magnificent chance for distinguishing themselves exists in this 
suggestion. It would not be necessary to read at all closely. They might, 
indeed, just jot down the headings (or " captions," as these young men 
are too fond of calling them) over telegrams and editorials, in order to 
grasp some idea of the magnitude of their undertaking. Their notes 
would then run somewhat in this strain: '* Greedy England Puts her Fin- 
ger in the Political Pie," " British Brag," "Albion Snubbed," " England 
Isolated," " John Bull Backing Down," "The Lion's Roar Worse than 
His Bite," " Great Britain to be Left Out in the Cold," "The Congress 
to Assemble without England,'" " The Treaty of San Stefano not to be 
Submitted," " England a Third-rate Power, with no Voice in European 
Affairs," " Beaconsfield Outwitted," etc. Now, with these trilling mem- 
oranda before him, the champion of the Barnacle, Gall, Oidlctin or Ghost, 
might set himself to prove either that the above were all misprints, or 
that these dreadful things have actually happened to England, which un- 
fortunate country is at the present moment asLxteenth-rate Power, which 
would be dismissed with a pulled nuse if it dared to interfere in Conti- 
nental affairs. Bring on your intellect, young gentlemen, and take your 
choice, but if the corps d'esprit which is said to obtain among thieves ex- 
ists also among liars, you really ought to prove something. 



Weighing the Suppliea. — An order has been passed to print by the 
Board of Supervisors ordering all meats, stores, and provisions furnished 
to the jails, prisons, hospitals, etc., to be sent to the City Hall to be 
weighed. How absurd this ruling — fir>tt cart all stuff to the City Hall tn 
be weighed by a paid officer, then cart the stuff to its designated place at 
an additional expense of drayage. What is to prevent the dumping of a 
quarter of beef, etc., en route to the Hospital ? Why not have a weigher 
at the Hospital, etc., to receive and count the goods as tV.ey are delivered 
by the contractors? Anything^ for an excuse to make a fat office for some 
clever politician. 



July 27, 1878. 



CALIFOHNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"H0«r the Crier!" "What the (levll irt Iboar 
'* Une tb*t will pUjr tlie dwil. nir. with you." 

" He'd a Btlng in his Uil u lonff u a fljiil, 
Whioh made Uim itrow bolder and bolder." 



Judg? Ord, of this bailiwick, is now in New York, and nmpIiKes tho 
eiij"\nient of lii.^ afttr ilinuer ciijar by Lrivini; tlie ii^purters of the jmpera 
tlierf Houii' of tilt) niiiist remarkable *' t.iffy" uu recoril. Witli his eyes 
shut, bis feet comfortably cocked up on some Windsor House ni:intel- 
|>ifcc, luid his fiLcv we:inn); the chiUMiku and bland expression of the 
h*i-iiuiue tlyed-in-the wwol pioneer (the most remarkable and unswerving,' 
Bet of romancists iu the civilized world, by the way), the Jud^'e reels otf 
to the gtiilele7«a newsjiaiwr men little fairy Btories, like the one about a 
certiun Mt. Hopjior, for instance. *' This Mr. Hopper," says the Juri;j;e, 
rtHectively, "was n man worth fifty millions or 8<i, a moderately well-to-do 
S.*n Franciscan, who spent a million of his pile in bnildin^ a mansion just 
out of iho city limits. [Quay— In tho nay?} The house was built 
by Chinamen, and the next day Kearney and his friends pulled down this 
house nnd used the bricks to chase Hopper [probably Ids first name was 
C!rass]into a 8<)nthern county, where he died of astonishment, or neivuus 
strain, or something, a few mouths ajjo." This made Kearney very much 
'noiiyhtafter,'"coutinuea the excellent Jud^'e, "and theworUingmen or the 
caj i;alists— he is not quite certain which — mean to elect him next President 
of the I'nited States, or else send him to .Sun Qi'i^^'tin for four years — he 
couhhi't exactly recollect. If the festive Juds^'e has not gone East to edit 
a volume of "L'aliftimiau Niifhts' Tales," he is terribly nejjlectinj; his na- 
tural jjifts, and his fellow pioneers will find it hard to forgive the indo- 
lence of so accomplished a liar, unless he hunts up Joaquin Miller and 
goes snuoks with that other highly original export in the perpetration of 
another "characteristic drama." After that — well, after that, shotguns. 

A great many Btories are going the rounds of the press, giving the 
re:isoii why Barnum, the showman, became a teetotaler, as though any- 
body cared a tin fip whether he w;is or not. However, as it is necessary 
to keep up with the literary demand of the times, we will proceed to give 
our theory of the change in question. It seems that attached to Bar- 
num's traveling show was an elephant, whose distinguishing characteristic 
was an intense hatred of the smell of liquor. It had been once very 
brutally used by .a keeper, whose cruelty to the poor beast, when in his 
cuj)s, Wiis simply outraireous, and the intelligent mammoth always associ- 
ated the smell of whisky with anticipated ill-treatment. One nigJit, 
while at Shreveport, La., Bamum i^nt very tight after the show, and 
(Staggered back to the tent with considerable difficulty. After feeling 
three times round the entire structure {which was as big as a ten acre lot} 
for the entrance, he finally got in, and endeavored to steer toward his 
hunk in the cashier's wagon. The first thing he stumbled against was the 
elephant, and the next morning he was found in the middle of the ring 
with a place on his head as though he had been struck by a sand-club. 
A few nights after, the same thing occurred, except that he was pitched 
some fifty feet further, and had one rib broken. It became apparent that 
the great showmau had either to reform or shoot the elephant, and, as a 
matter of zoological economy, he forthwith quit drinking. He says he 
doesn't intend to begin again unless he is elected to Congress uext Fall, 
where, he und^.rstands, they think nothing of a breath that would kill an 
elephant at forty yards. 

The New York public is still "kicking," to use an elegant localism, 
against the noise made by the elevated railroad, and, failing to obtain re- 
dress from the courts, has concluded to take the law into its own hands. 
A correspondent says it is at least mildly exciting to ride down on one of 
the morning ti-ips and see whole rows of gloomy browed citi2ens standing 
at their second-story windows, with their left arms full of bricks, waiting 
to "bat" the conductors of the objectionable vehicles over the head as 
they rumble by. A couple of water-front merchants, for illustration, are 
comparing notes as to the rise in suyar, when a bucket of dish-water is 
impartially deposited in their laps by a Biddy from the story just above 
their heads. The engineer puts on as much steam as possible to dodge 
these little mementoes, until the passengers are reminded of the good old 
early settlement days when the Indians used to chase the mail in every 
day ahead of time. These cars are a nuisance in other ways. The other 
day one unexpectedly stopped in front of a window through which a 
young man was detected in the act of killing an old, rich and altogether 
unnecessary uncle. To-day the young man is in jail, waiting to be event- 
ually hung, while the property for which he so patiently waited is being 
divided araoug a family of red-headed Democrats. 

We hope the real General of the late United States Army, that is 
to say, AJrs. Wm. Tecumseh Sherman, is satisfied at last. She has in- 
duced her son Thomas to turn into a monk, or a " male nun," as we be- 
lieve she expresses it. Thomas is a callow youth, fresh from the George- 
to\vii College, and remarkable for his Shermauian length of limb and an 
equally hereditary abnormal development of the knee joints. The last time 
we saw this monastically inclined individual he was attired in a pair of tight 
spring-bottom pants, with his suspenders down, and frantically chasing a 
foul base ball over a fence. We can see, in the mind's eye, Horatio, this 
"popularand efficientshort-stop" sequestered in the brown ulster peculiarto 
friars, gim swab head and all, telling a highly interested circle of bald- 
headed colleagues, in the seclusion of his cell, how he took a red-hot liner 
off Ferguson's bat, and how the Red Stockings batted the Bostons for 
fourteen runs. Papa Sherman is naturally very much disgusted, as he 
intended Tom for a constitutional lawyer, in order to get the North and 
South fighting again, it is supposed. Even "Marching Thro' Georgia" 
doesn't cheer him up now, and he shakes his head very mournfully as he 
remarks that he understands " there is very little money in amateur 
monking now a-days." 

A French Committee have just tranemitted to the -widow of John 
Brown — the late lamented, whose "body is a marchin' on" — a handsome 
Commemoration medal. Let Kearney be of good cheer. In the fullness 
of fate he may be shot by an excited militiaman, or clubbed to death by 
one of the city's ^^(/i municipal police. But when the Bul/etin a,ud Call 
have ceased dancing over his grave, afar forward in the dim grayness of 
the coming dawn a big medallion hangs pulsing above the horizon of pos- 
terity like the star that heralds the sunburst of the millenium, and— [but 
we must go out and take a drink on the strength of that last sentence — we 
must indeed. 



The Potter Investigating Committee will go <lown to posterity 
fraught with the terrible responsibility of having fointed a new and terri- 
hU- creature upon a long '*ulfering and already over burdened world. We 
alhulo to the "chippy" female witness. Since Mrs. Captain Jenks was 
permitted to air her toilets and impudence before that (.'mnmittee, every 
wonuin in the land yearns in her inmost henrt to wear " turbau" hats, 
iind sit in an arm chair with hare arms and " sjiss" lawyers. Mi-s. John 
Sniith, for illustration, a distinguished dishwasher for a family of ten 
children, is sent for to testify in an a.ssault and battery ciwe. She simpers 
into the box with her trunk empty, and looking like a rainbow on a pic- 
nic. _ " Do you know the prisoner ?" asks tho Prosecuting Attorney. " I 
giveit up." gigf^les the disciple of Jenks, much Jistoniahed that her bril- 
liancy is not followed by "general laughter." The other day, in the Fourth 
District Court, a lawyer bore a good deal of this " cheap talk" from a 
female witness. Finally he said, "Have you anything further to say ?" 
" Nothing, except that you are very near a fool, ' simpered the woman, 
wht> wanted to retire in a blaze of glory. " So I am," retorted the im- 
perturable man of law. "So I am. Sit a little further off, please." 



Beecher, the most wT-itten up, written down, and written at man in 
the universe, may exjject a lively time of it in this town of modest and 
diffident newspaper men. When Theodore Tilton was here, he got up 
one night at the Palace in gi-eat trepidation and violently rang for a 
waiter. The servant found the long-haired lecturer standing outside of 
the door in his night-gown. " I want assistance, immediately. There is 
a man under my bed !" "Oh ! that's all right," rei^lied the man, cheer- 
fully, "it's only the Chronicle reporter." And so it proved. 

" Why did you strike the plaintiff?" said a Vallejo Judge the other 
day to an Italian fishei-man. " There was a vendetta between us." **A 
what?" "A vendetta." "Have you a license for carrying it?" asked the 
Judge, after a profound pause. "A license? I have a fish license." 
" Very well, sir ; you get only thirty days this pop. but the next time you 
bring a word like that into this court, already loaded, I'll make it life, sir, 
life. Take away the prisoner, Mr, Bailiff, and see that he don't explode 
while you search him. A vendetta, indeed." 

A dramatic ■writer in Londttn Truth writes a hole through, apparently, 
every otlier critic in London, and asserts that they have formed a clique 
to blackmail prima donne. He goes on to reassure the latter, however, 
and bids them to tremble no longer, that he will protect them. Further 
than this, he entreats these abused singers to come to him if they ** want 
anj'thing done." The Truth man evidently believes that some things can 
be furnished cheaper by retail than by wholesale. 

An enterprising inventor has sent up a model of an improved editor's 
hat. It is made of sheet-iron, is club-proof and waddtd, so as to make 
the concussion of an ordinary brick a very trivial matter. Protected by 
this invaluable adjunct to comfortable journals we are now prepared to 
even call MoUie McCarthy " that equine mud turtle." 

An American gentleman, who has accumulated a considerable for- 
tune in the oil regions, has written to the "Proprietor of Mont IJlanc" to 
say that he intends making the Continental tour this Fall, and that un- 
less an elevator is at once erected in connection with that mountain, it 
need not expect to enjoy his family custom. 

We are glad to st^ate that the poet Longfellow has opened a branch 
office on this coast. At least we have received for publication a manu- 
script copy of " The Day is Done," signed by a Mr. George T. Guffey, 
who, we suppose, is Mr. L.'s agent, or commission merchant, or some- 
thing. See advertising rates, George. 

They are always turning up some new evidence of the President's 
incapacity. It now appears that George Francis Train offered to goto 
the Paris Exposition as a United States Commissioner, and yet the ad- 
ministration neglected a chance like that to get him out of the country. 
Hayes might as well be impeached at once. 

We don't mean to say that Petaluma is a particularly poor town, 
but we remember that once when a misguided San Francisco burglar tried 
to enter a store in that burg, the inhabitants caught him, went through his 
pockets, and business generally brightened up in consequence for the next 
six months. 

A doctress on Stockton street advertises to "produce hair" on the 
baldest heads after a few weeks' manipulation of the same. She points 
with just pride to the fact that among her patrons are the regular occu- 
pants of the first four orchestra rows of every theater in the city. 

Mrs. Dates' Troupe is again on its way to this unhappy city, and yet 
nothing seems to have been done for the public defence. The Safety 
Committee has disbanded, no orders have been issued to the militia, and 
even the Alta seems duller than usual. 

That highly respectable colored person, the Shah of Persia, has been 
endearing himself to the Parisian f/'^tmin by emptying chests of silver wut 
of Ids hotel windows. He has probably been consulting some English 
physician, and advised to throw out his chest. 

A down-easter has invented an artificial honey-comb for bees, and 
which will enable them to devote their entire time to gathering honey. 
He is now at work on a rubber boy for them to take it out on while the 
honey is being removed. 

They are going to hang a couple of young men at St. Louis, just for 
killing a rich old miser of an uncle; and yet that is the town where they 
are for ever petitioning Congress to do something to put more money in 
ci: culation. 

The Editor of the " Bulletin" takes pains to remark that he " wears 
no man's collar." If that is the case, all we have to say is that he turns 
the one he does wear pretty often. 

''I can't understand why people complain of hard times," said a 
Kearny street pawn-broker, the other morning; "why, my business gets 
better every day! " 

An envious foreign correspondent suggests that we set fire to New 
York some night, as the only way to rival the grand Parisian illumination 
of last week. 

The TATashington Hotel, at Poughkeepsie, has caught fire eight times 
in the last six months. They call it now that bum to which no traveler 
returns. 

Somebody calls Senator Jones " the daddy of our dollars." So far as 
we are concerned he might as well be perfectly childless. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 27, 1878. 



"FALLING STARS." 

A star falls in the skyj 

They say a birth 

Is registered on earth. 
To live and die. 
star! in thy descent 

Dost thou brinff love 

From worlds above, 
Or discontent? 
Star falling- from on high. 

Bringing to earth 

Celestial birth, 
Dost thon not sigh? 
So many stars must falll 

Some go astray. 

We only pray, 
God find them all. 
— Sara Jewctt, in New York World, 

"A POTATOG-HAPH." 
An elderly lady from the interior regions of 
Ireland recently arrived in Dublin, and, upon 
persuasion, patronized ai't by having her potato- 
graph taken. When the artist removed the plate 
he told her she need nut sit any longer, but on 
coming out from the dark room he found her still 
bolt upright in the chair. " You needn't sit 
there any longer," said the frightened artist. 
** What's that ?" she hoarsely whispered, without 
changing a muscle. "I say you needn't sit there 
now — 1 have finished," he explained. "Ain't I 
to pay yethree-aud-sixpence for my potatograph?" 
she interrogated, dexterously handling a stout 
umbrella. '* Yes, madam," meekly responded 
the artist. " Well, then," replied the sitter, em- 
phasizing her speech by bringing the end of her 
umbrella down smartly at each word, " you can't 
* do them 'in that time; I'll have my money's 
worth ;" and she sat there an hour — leaving with 
her " potatograph," which was hurriedly finislied 
off for the comfort of peace at any price. The 
scene would suit the pencil of Nicoll. 

Yet another of these naive tales. "Am I 
really such a duck?" she said, when the painter 
who was to "academize" her showed her the re- 
sult of his labors. — Truth. 




C^ommencingr Saiiilay, July IJth, 1878, 
J Passenger Tmiiis will leave San Francisco, from 
Passenger Depot on Townsend street, between Third 
and Fourth streets, as follows : 

8 0A A-M. daily for Sau Jose, Gilroy, Holhster, Tres 
*0\j pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all Way 
Statiuns. ^^ At Pajako, the Santa Cruz R. R. con- 
nects with this train for Aptos and Santa Cruz. 
1^^ At Salinas the SI. & S. V. R. R. connects with 
this train for Monti;rey. ^^" Stage connections made 
with this train. ^^^ Parlok Car attached to this train. 

~\ (\ JLC\ -'^^'- daily for Sau Jose and Way Stations. 

3^0 ^■"' ^'^'^^y (Sundays excepted) for Gilroy, Pa- 
•*^^-' jaro, Hoilister, Tres Pinos and Way Stations. 
^^ Stage Connection made with this train at Sakta 
Clara for Pacific Congress Springs. 

C^~ OnS.VTimnAYs only, the Santa Cruz R. R. con- 
nects with this train at P"a.taro for Aptoa and Santa 
Cruz. RETcaNiso, passengers leave Santa Cruz at 4:30 
A.M. Mondays (breakfast at Gilroy), arriving in San Fran- 
cisco at 10:00 a.m. 

.e^SPECiAi, Notice.— On SATURDA-»S ONLY, the 
run of this train will be extended to SALINAS, connect- 
ing with the H. and S. V. R. R. for MONTLiREY. Re- 
turning, leave Monterey MONDAYS (Breakfast at Gil- 
roy), iirriving at San Francisco at 10:00 a.m. 

A A,C\ P.M- (daily) for San Jose and Way Stations. 



6.30 



P.M. (daily) for Menlo Park and Way Stations. 



^g=* SUNDAYS an EXTRA TRAIN will leave for San 
Jose and Way Stations at 9:30 A.M. Returning, will 
leave San Jose at ti:00 P.M. 

C^^ ExcuRSiox Tickets to Sau Jose and other points 
and return sold on Saturdays and Sunday mornings. 
Good for return until following Monday inclusive. 

^^ Also, EXCURSION TICKETS to MONTEREY— 
Good from Saturday until following Monday inclusive. 
A- C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 

H. R. JUDAH, Assistant Passenger and Ticket Agent. 
"SOUTDERI* DIVISIOXS. 

yy~ Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road %vill take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at -1:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave, Los 
Angeles, Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton, Colorado River 
and Yuma. July 27. 



S. p. C. R. R. 

( N A B K O W Q A TJ G E . ) 

STEW ROUTE TO AI^AMEDA, SAN JOSE 
ANB SANTA CKUZ. 

SUMMER ARRANGEMENT, 1878. 
/^onimeiicjn^ Sntarday, June 1, 1S79, 

\y and until farther notice, trains and boats will leave 
San Francisco at the New Ferry Landinjj, Market street: 



K OO ^' ^'■' ^'* Alameda Ferry, daily, for Alameda, 
fj»yjyj West San Leandro, West San Lorenzo, Mount 
Eden, Alvarado, Hall's, Newark, Mowry's, Alviso, Ag- 
iiew's, Santa Clara, San Jose, Lovelady's, Los Gatos, Alina. 



9 0/~\ A. M,, via Alameda Ferry, daily, for Alameda; 
• ^" Newark, Alviso, Santa Clara, San Jose, Los 
Gatos, Alma, and all Way Stations, connecting at Los 
Gatos with Coltfrove's stages for Oil Wells, Patchen, 
^lountain Charley's, Martin's Ranch, Scott's Valley and 
Santa Cruz, or via Wright's Summit, Hotel de Redwood, 
Comstock's Mill, Mason's Grove, Soouel to Santa Cruz. 
Also connecting at Los GaWa with Blabon's stages for 
Saratoga and Congress Sliringe. (Dinner at Los Gatos.) 



4 00 P- M., via Alameda Ferry, daily, for Alameda, 
• "^-' Newark, Santa Clara, Sau Jose, Alma, and 
all Way Stations. 



^^ On Saturdays only stages ml! connect with the 
4.20 P.M. train at Los Gatos for Santa Cruz and Saratoga. 
Returning, leave Santa Cruz at 1 A.M. , Monday (breakfast 
at Los Gatos), arriving in San Francisco at 10.15 A.M. 

Ferries aiifl I.ocnl Trains will Run as 
Follows: 



LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO DAILY. 



LEAVE HIGH STREET (ALAMEDA) DAILY. 



A.M. 
5.40 



P.M. 
•3.00 



P.M. 
7.00 



*Sundays only. 
THOS. CARTER, GEO. H. WAGGONER, 

Superintendent. [June 1.] Gen. Pas. & Tkt Agt. 



C. p. R. R. 



Commencmg 'Wednesday, Jnly lOth, 1878, and un- 
til further notice, Trains and Boats will Leave 
SAN FRANCISCO: 



7f\r\ A. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from .Market 
-yjyj Street Landing — Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
and Sacramento. Connecting at Davis (Sundays except- 
ed) for Woodland, Williams and Knight's Landing. 

(Arrive Sau Francisco 3:55 P.M.) 



8f\f\ A.M. (dailj-), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
•^'-' land Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland (Or.), Colfax, Reno (Virginia City), Pali- 
sade (Eureka), Ogden and Omaha. Connects at Gait 
witll train arriWng at lone at 3:40 P.M. 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:35 p.m.) 



8Qi\ A.M. (Sunda.vs only), Special Train via Oak- 
•^'' land Ferry, arrives at Martinez 10.15 A.M. 
Returning, leaves Martinez 4.10 P M., arrives San Fran- 
cisco 0:00 P.M "Excursion Tickets at Hedaced Rates." 

9 0A A.M. (Sundays excepted). Northern Railway 
• ij^ Accommodation Train (via Oakland Ferry) 
to Martinez. (Arrive Sau t'ranci.'ico 3:35 P..M. 



land Ferry and Niles), stopping at all Way Sta- 
Arrives at San Jose at 5:30 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco9:35 A.,y.) 



3 0iA P.Jl. (daily) Northern Railway Passenger Train 
• '^v/ (via Oakland FeiTy) to .San Pablo and Mar- 
tinez. (Arrive San Francisco 9:35 A.M.) 



4-00 ''•'"■ (''"■'y) Express Train (via Oakland Ferrj-), 
^•^^ for LathropandStockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
ner, Mojave, NewliaU(Sim Buenaventura, Santa Barbara), 
Los ASQKLES, " Santa Monica," Wilmington, Santa Ana 
(San Diego), Colton and Yuma (Arizona Stages and Colo- 
rado River Steamers). 

"Sleeping Cars" between Oakland, Los Angeles and 
Yuma. Connects at Niles with train arriving at San 
Jose at 6:55 p.m. (Arrive San Francisco 12:40 P..M.) 



A C\f\ P. M. (Sunda.vs excepted) Vallejo Steamer (from 
"*'^^ -Market Street Landing), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento ; and at Sacramento with Pas- 
senger Train, leaving at 9:35 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thurs- 
days and Saturdays only, forXruckee, Keno, Carson and 
Virginia. 

" Sleeping Cars" between Vallejo and Carson. 

(Arrive San Francisco 11:10 a.m.) 



4C\r\ P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
•^^ (from Wash'n St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sacra- 
mento at 9:00 A.M., dail.v. (Arrive San FraneiscoS:00 P.M. 



4 0/k P.M. (daily). Through Third Class and. \ccom- 
m%J\' modation Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, 
arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 11:55 a..m. 

(Arrive Sau Francisco 7:30 jlm. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAI HS 



From " SAN FRAN CI SCO," Paily. 



)B(ilO 
7.00 
7.30 
8.00 
8.30 
9.00 
9.30 
10.00 
10.30 
11.00 
11.30 
12.00 



12.30 
1.00 
1.31 



ga 



A. M. 
7.00 
8.00 
9.00 
10.00 
11.00 
12.00 



2.00 
3.00 
3.30 
4.00 
4.30 
6.00 
6.30 

e.oo 

6.30l 
7.00 
8.10b"7.OO 
9.20'b'^3.10 
10.30IC'10:» 
Ell.45 B"1145 
I 



1.30 
•2.00 
■3.00 
4.00 
"6.00 
0,00 



<< 






8.00 
(9.30 

P M. 

tl.OO 
3.00 
4.0O 

ts.io 



s.ool 

4.00 

ts.io 



A. M. 
B6.10 
7.30 
8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
n.30 
P. M. 
12.30 
1.00 
3.301 



5.30"- , ' 

6.30 
7.00 

S.lO'tChange Cars 
9,-20 at 

10.30 East Oakland 
BII.45I 



A. M. I A. M. 

7.:m 

8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
11.30 



P. M. 
1.00 
4.00 
6.00 
COO 






A. M. 
B6.10 

8.00 
10.00 
p. M. 
3.00 
4.30 
5.30 
0.00 



Change Care 

at 
West O'kUind 



-Sundays excepted. c— Sundays only. 

*Alameda Passengers change ears at Oakland. 
To FiiRNSlDE— except Sunda.vs — 7.00, 9.00, 10.00 
A.M. , and 5:00 P.M. 
To S.AN JoSE— Daily— 19:30 A.M., 3:00, 4:00 p.m. 



To " SAN FRANCISCO," Paily. 



^a 






A. M. I A. 



1 0.301 
8.00 

lO.OOl 

P. M. 
3.00 
4. 30 1 
5.301 



B5.40 
7.30 
8.30 



LOO 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



A. M. 

B-5.00 

B'5.40 

•0.25 

7.00 

8.03 

9.00 

10.03 

11.03 

12,00 

P. M. 



Change Cars 

at 
West Oaklnd. 



1.00 

3.00 

■3.20 

4.00 

6.00 

6.03 

B*7.20 

B"S.30 

•10.00 



A. M. 

16.45 
7.55 
11.15 
(11.45 
p. M. 
3.40 






(7 
3.15 
11.35 



(Change Cars 

at 
East Oatdand 



OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 



A. M. I 

B 5.101 

B5.50 

0.40 

7.40 

8.40 

9.40 

10.40 

II.40I 

p. M. 

12.40 

1.'25 

2.40 

4.40 

6.40 

6.40 . 

7.50 



A. M. 
B5.20 
B6.00 
6.50 
7.20 
7.60 
8.25 
8.60 
9.20 
9.60 
10.20 
10.50 
11.'20 
ll.SiO 



10.10 



r. M. 

12.20 

12 :-.0 
1.20 
1.50 
2.50 
3.20 
3.50 
4. -20 
4.50 
5. -20 
6.50 
6.25 
6.50 
8.00 
9.10 

10.'20 



B— Sundays excepted. 

•Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 

From FERNSIDE— except Sundays— S.0O, 10.00, ; 

A.M., and 6.00 p.m. 

FROM S.AN JOSE— Daily— 7:05 and 8:10 .i.H. 



CREEK ROFTE. 

From SANFRANCISOO— Zlai/y— b6:30, b7:20, 8:16, 9:15, 
10:15, 11:16 A.M , 12:15, 1:15, 2:25, 3:16. 4:15, 6:15, 
6:15 P.M. 

Fkom OAKLAND— 2>ai(!/—B6:-20, B7:10, 8:05,9:05,10:05, 
11:05 A.M., 12:05, 1:05, 2:16, 3:05, 4:05, 6:06, 6:06 P.M. 
Daity, Sundays excepted. 



"Official Schedule 'Time" furnished by Asdkrsox & 
Rasdolpu, Jewelers, 101 and 103 Slontgomerv St., S. F. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. TowNE, General Superintendent. 



S. p. R. R. 

(NORTHERN DIVISION.) 
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEitlENT. 

(^omincueiii^ Satiiriia.v. July IS, 1S7S, 
J E.XCUHSION TICKETS will be sold liv this Com- 
IKWV from SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN JOSE' AND OTH- 
ER POINTS AND RETURN, 

At Greatly Reduced Rates. 

(Tickets to San Jose, good for Return by either the 
Southern or Central Pacific Railroads.) 

These Tickete will be sold ONLY on SATUKD AYS and 
SUND.AY MORNINGS. 

The RETURN TRIP Ticket will not be good for pas- 
sage after the MONDAY following the date of purchase. 

TICKET OFFICES— Passenger Depot, Townseud St., 
and at Valencia street Station. 

A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 

H. R. JUDAH, Ass't Passenger and Ticket Ag't.- 

Notice."SAN JOSE Excursion Tickets (via C. P. R. 
R.) can be purchased at the offices of the Central Pacific 
Railroad, Oakland Ferry, foot of Market street. Situ 
Francisco; also at the several Ticket Otfiees in Oakland. 
f .July 20.1 



CUNAED LINE. 

Britisli aii4l Nortll American Royal 
.Mail Steamships between NEW YORK and LIV- 
ERPOOL, calling at IJUEENSTOWN, sailing from New 
York EVERY WEDNESDAY. 

BOTHNIA My 16— Je 19— Jv 24— A 28— .. . . — O 2 

(ALGERIA My22— Je20— Jy31— ....— S 4-0 9 

RUSSIA My29-....— Jy 3— Ag7-Sll-0 18 

SCYTHIA Je li— Jv 10— A 14. .S 18 -O 23 

ABYSSINIA ,Je 12-Jy 17— .\ 21— S '25-0 30 

Passage can be secured and all information given on 
application to WILLIAMS, BLANCHAllD & CO., 

May 18. 218 California St. 



il 



July 27, 1878. 



CAUFORNIA ADVEKTISER. 



13 



Notabllla. 



The dust of San Francisco has mmle the pnintiiiK of reoidencea a 
stuily for yejin*. The tiue miUtittu ancliitecture cf our buililiiiiw is fre- 
i|(u-i)ll,v luurriii in apiH'araiu-e Ity it. Alhiyiu^ theduMt by wrttfrinjs- liues 
t*'iii|>«'r»rily, iuit is of little iK'iiefit. The UKumiT in which moat piuntcre 
mix the roiumon white lead with oil, when applieJ to huihlings is v»f very 
little UM iigikiiiKt the action of wiml nnil dust. In a few months, si^'nn of 
wear mm t*> be distinctly noticed, and in hundnds "f cases the ordiimry 
naint imivett no luivteriid benttit to the house. Im|iroveraeiits in the mix- 
ing of {uunt h:ive nuide wonderfid prugretttt, and now, standing heutl and 
xhotddci's above all the old-fashiuned mixtures, ia the " Avorill Mixed 
I'aint." This is maunfactured from strictly pure white lead zinc and 
pure linseed oil, to wliich is added water glass, which chemically unites 
the ingretiieuts and holds tliem in solution, so tJiey cannot sef-arate. Aa 
a liouse paint it lias no equal, producing a brilliant, glossy finish, iniperv- 
i*Kis to the weather, and Ia>iting twice as long as any otiier paint m.tdo. 
Another advantage in its being mixed ready for use is, that it can be 
shipped to any part of the State, and can be applie<l by a novice as well 
as by a proft^ssioual. Orders can be sent to the California Paint Co., 329 
Market street, S. F. 

A Stopper. — "Is this the place," she asked, as she wandered down on 
the biirrt-n sands, "where a young lady— a beautiful young lady — fell into 
the water lawt season, and was rescued by a gallant young man, whom 
she afterward mairied?" Heloi-ked at lier carefully, estimated her at a 
square ftutyseven, mth false teeth, and said, "Yes ma'am, but I don't 
know how to swim." 

The other day, a man of exceedingly gentlemanly appearance pre- 
sented himself at the office of the Director of the Police in Paris, saying 
that he brought certain iufonnatiou. He was asked to sit down. "I 
must tell you," said the director, " that there is a pardon, and also a re- 
ward in money for the informers, if they were implicated in the crime." 
" Is the principal author of the crime included in the offer?" asked the 
stranger. " Oh, no," was the answer. The stranger arose, and, saluting 
the director, said: '" Then piirdon me for having troubled you," and off be 
walked before the chief could offer the man a glass of Landsberger's 
Champagne. __^ _„__ 

The idea has prevailed for many years that Adam was the original 
swain. Shak^peare taught many to believe Romeo aud Juliet were. 
When Rignold was here, he was written up as such. But all they 
said pertainiup to the subject did not decide the question. At last it has 
been solved. Numerous and elegant were the carriages standing in front 
of 2V^ Sutter street. Crov-ds entered, were catered to, and as they came 
from the quiet nook the discovery and decision came also. Here was the 
t^riu'inal Swain, and here can be found the nicest place for ladies to meet 
their friends and have a quiet hmch. 

Hard Times. — We can't say that the world is growing better, but 
have been repeatedly assured by eminent business men that it is a good 
deal harder now to get trusted for a pound of biscuits than it used to be 
to steal a barrel of pork^ 

Pauline Markham's "W^ardrobe was seized for a board bill in St. 
Louis, recently. On the way from the theater, the deputy sheriff dropped 
the articles of dress, and it was nearly an hour before he found them. 
Then be placed the wardrobe in his pocket-book to avoid a similar mishap. 
Any doubts of our veracity can be easily removed by calling on Bradley 
& Kulofson. Tbey took her picture in that same wardrobe six years ago. 

It is very likely cremation will get a hold on the San Francisco and 
Sancelito public after all. The sea-captainsand steamer agents believe in it; 
for when a vessel is too old for use, they take the old hulk to Saucelito 
and burn it rather than let it rot. By the bye, why is it that Heidseick 
Champagne is generally handed round at these events? Can it be the 
popularity of 1. & P. J. Cassin, the agents? 



"It is a shame, John, that I have to sit here mending your old 
clothesl " exclaimed a wife the other day. " Don't say a word about it, 
my dear," rejoined the husband ; "the least said the soonest mended." 



Silverware. — Messrs. Anderson & Randolph, corner of Montgomery 
and Sutter streets, have now in stock the largest and most complete as- 
sortment of solid sterling Silverware of any house on the coast. New and 
beautiful designs have been recently manufactured by them, which excells 
in elegance and style anything to be found in this city. 

For upwards of thirty years Miis. Winslow's Soothing Syrup has 
been used for children. It corrects acidity of the stomach, relieves wind 
colic, regulates the bowels, cures dysentery and diarrhfea, whether arising 
from teething or other causes. Aji old and well-tried remedy. Ticenty- 
Jii'e cents a bottle. 

Said a young doctor to a lady patient: " You must take exercise for 
your health, my dear." "All right," said she; "I'll jump at the first 
offer." They were raari-ied about si. x months afterward, went to house- 
keeping, bought a Union Range of De La Montanya, on Jackson street, 
and are as happy as two sucking doves. 



" He Would Insinuate."— A well-laiown literary celebrity is now 
stated ta have "made his mark." This confirms a skeptic's impression 
that he is quite unable to write. 

A young man in Cincinnati lost his bride the other day. She smelt 
whisky on his breath and left the altar. Why is it that these marriage- 
able young men wiU not stick to the ever-faithful Napa Soda when the 
time comes ? 

A lady, residing on Post street, wears a train thirty feet long, and when 
she walks up stairs her disheartened husband goes up in the elevator, 
wondering why it is the " White House " will insist on having the latest 
styles. 

In the palmiest days of prosperity Adam did not wear an overcoat on 
the Fourth of July. But in those days J, M. Litclifield had not located 
at 415 Montgomery street with his Latest styles, startling the natives. 



COUNTRY RESORTS. 



SWANTON HOUSE, PESCADERO. 

ThtM Popiilnr Hotel, togr«tlier witli the ilvCiU'hoil CottfiK«H; 
whifli iiro mil tin: loiwt uf its attroctivu features. Iiivvi; Iwcn newly fununhcu 
tlintughiiut, and uro ihhv <»p«ii for thu rcci-ptiou uf gUL-ats. Thoso dusiriUL' to visit 
tliu iimst ciijuyiiblu uf uU unr sta-Bido rfaorlsii, uun luiiko no uiistaku iu dct-iuing ujkhi 
Pcsciiduro. 

IT IS EASILY REACHED. 
and is unsur])i\ssud in the excellence uf its uliiunte, tlie bciuit;' of its Kcoiiery, iiiid iu 
tliu iittnietivetiess of ita truly reiiiarkablu uca b(;ai.^h. Tlmse cxtrutirdiimrv juiblileM, 
union^' which are Ui be fuuiid agates, npals, sapiihircs, et<;., were never so iiumeroufi 
lis now, the piiat Winter having thrown up iiuiuciiso numbers of eurioualy-sliaped 
stunea, wliieh fur ages hiive been bubitcted to the everlasting UHtliinis of tlio tiruless 
I'aciflo. GOOD TKOUT FlSlllNti is ubluiiiable in the Pcscadero river. 
^T" The hotel prices are fixed to suit the times. [April 27. 

TERRACE SWIMMINS BATHS, 

Foot of Webster Street, on Central Avenue. Alameda Beach. 

Now open to the public, and |»rouoiiitee<l Ity tlie ''elite-" of 
San FnnR'isL'M and (.'akiaiid as the onlj" jilacc fur a guud bath ou the Pacific 
(J^iast. Perfect security agaiiiit monsters of thy deep, aud high water at all times 
of day and night. 

Special Accommodations for Ladies Unattended. 

Reached in thirty-five minutes from San Francisco by steamer NEWARK— depot 
oil the premises - or 0. P. U. R. to Mastic Station, and from Oakland by horse-cars 
at Broadway Station, running within two blocks of Baths. 
BATHS. 25 CENTS, 
Incliidinff Private Jioom, Jiathiny Suit, TotvefSf Shower SatJis, etc, 

July 13. K. HALEY, Proprietor. 

SPORTSMEN'S^EMPORIUM. 

Fishing' and liuiitin^ Pants and Stoeklngrs. Rods, Reels, 
Flies, and the Celebrated Six-Splice Bamboo Salmon, CJritse, Uass and Fly 
Rods. Also the largest and finest assortment of Guns, RiHes, Pistols, Fishing Tackle 
and Sporting Articles on the Pacific Coast. Breech and Muzzle -Loading Double and 
Single (juns from the best makers ; Remington Sporting Rifles ; Ballard, Sharp and 
Winchester Rifles. Also the largest and most complete assortment of Sporting and 
Gunmakers' Materials iu the United States. LIDDLE & KAEDINU, 

AiJril 27. 633 Washington street, San Francisco. 

PACIFIC OCEAN HOUSL 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA. 

Tills elegrnnt eMtablisliinent has beeai completely renovated 
throughout, and oilers special attractions and inducements to the public. 
The addition of a Idrge play and OROQ^/KT grounds, the inereasintr of DANCING 
accommodations, are the latest iniprovenienta for the pleasure of the guests. It is 
the ONLY hotel at Santa Cruz that can claim pre-eminence as a FIRST-CLASS 
HOUSE of entertainment, being the best regulated and sustained in this famous 
B ummer resort. [May 11.] J. H. HOADLKY, Pioprietor. 

OCEAN villa! 

SANTA CRTJZ. CALIFORNIA. 

Georg'e H. Bliss, Proprietor.— I..arse, well-furnlsbed Rooms, 
Single or in Suites. Cotta^jes for families that desire them. Grounds large, 
romantic aud pleasant. Situated forty feet above tide water, having a beautiful view 
of tlie Bay, Ocean, City and Mountains. Premises extend to river's edge, affording . 
rare facilities for Boating, Bathing and Fishing. No pains spared to please our 
guests. P. O. Box lOU. July 13. 

THE GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL. 

OAKLAND. CAL. 

J C. Olmsted is happy to nunouuce to Ills frleuds and tbe 
• public that he has become associated with MR. J. W. BLACK, and it is pro- 
posed to make THE GRAND CENTRAL as jiopular as it was during his former three 
years management. The prices for board and rooms are as reasonable as any one 
could desire, and the house and table will be kept fujly up to its former reputation. 
Oaklan d, May 1, 1 878. May 18 . 

PARISIAN HOUSE. 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA. 

The proprietor of the above favorite resort takes pleasure 
in iDformii.g his patrons and the imblic that he has entirely renovated his es- 
tablishment, to which he has added a splendid Garden, with Arbors, Swings, and ev- 
erything for the comfort and amusement of visitors. Board and Lixiging for Fam- 
ilies by the week or month at moderate prices. 
April 13. ETIENNE SIVIEROU. Proprietor. 

TAMALPAI'S HOTEL. 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA. 

TtaJs Iioaselias been ttaoroH^bly renovated and newly fur- 
nished, and is now open to the public. Persons wishing rooms should apply 
early. Climate unsurpassed, Teims moderate. Special Rates for Families. 
June 22. OSCAR LEWIS, Proprietor. 

JULIAN'S HOTEL. 

The Largest Country Motel in the INtatc. --Duncan's Mill, 
Sonoma County, California.— J. JULIAN, Proprietor. — Terminus North Pacific 
Ouast Railroad, and Connecting Point of ail Stage Lines for the North Pacific Coast. 
A favorite resort for Tourists, Hunting and Fishing Parties. April 13. 

CONQRESS SPRINGS. 

Open for the season ou aud after April 20th, TaheS. P. R. 
it. first afternoon train to Santa Clara, and connect with stage for Springs. 
Time, Siboiu-s. Goodhuntingandfishing; Jiverystable; telegraphic communieatiou. 
April's. LEWIS A. SAGE, Proprietor. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE. 

NEVILLE & CO., 
113 Clay aud 114 Commercial Streets, 



San Francisco. 



[May 24. 



BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL 

Attendance, fiaily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions aud donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 
Oct. 23. 730 Montgomery street. 



S' 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

old by all Stationers. Sole A^eut lor the United States: 

SIR. HENRY HOE, 91 John street, N. Y:- Jan. 5. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 27, 1878. 



BIZ. 



It JB with sincere giatification that we remark a lar^e increase of 
merchants and business men <m 'Chaiij,'e during the regular buura of traffic. 
This is the case both at the Produce E.tchange and at the California street 
Merchants' Exchange. Tliere is also of late quite an increase of member- 
ship at the Produce Exchange— particularly so since the death of Isaac 
Friedlander. 

The "Wheat crop is now moving towards tide water quite lively, and 
the exports of same rapidly ausrmenting. The demand for wheat is ur- 
gent, both from local millers and exporters. The former buy to fill flour 
orders for China. The requirements for Hongkong are great, and equal, 
if not exceed, the carrying space allotted them in the largest steamers 
running in the line, the City of Peking last week carrying 11,000 barrels, 
and the Belgic to follow with as much more. 

In general merchandise some important transactions command our 
attention. Messrs. Parrott & Co. have chartered the ship Isle of Bute 
for London at the low freight of £2 7s. 6d., to carry some 10,000 ba^'S of 
prime green Central American coflfee. This will be a decided relief to 
the market and promises a fair return of profit on the venture. Our spot 
stock of coffee July 1st consisted of 52,700 bags Central American, and 
1,500 bags Java and IV'Ianila. It is generally thought that the future of 
the coffee market will be sustained at about current rates of 17 to ISc, 
and that any surplus we may have will be wanted in St. Louis, Chicago, 
and other marts of the so-called '* Western Keserve." 

Sugar purchases here have been large since the arrival of the Zea- 
landia from Honolulu, announcing large operations at the Islands by Mr. 
Claus Spreckles on account of the California Sugar Refinery. These pur- 
chases included some 12,000 to 15,000 tons of new crop for forward de- 
livery, or nearly one-half of next season's Hawaiian crop. Since this in- 
telliiience transpired quite an active tra<ie has been done here by local 
dealers, the jobbers and others having bought this week upwards of 10,- 
000 kegs Hawaiian Sugai-s, grocery grades, at S.^c. for the best kinds, and 
from that down to 7i@7j(j. For the balance of the stock liberal offers 
have been made to tlie importer, and it is probable that the grocers will 
secure it all within a short time. The price of White Refined Sugar re- 
mains the same as for eight months past, say ll.|<fl)ll^c., and for Yellow 
Refined 8@9ic., according to quality. Inuring the past year very little 
raw Sugar has been imported outside the Refiners, they preferring to im- 
port their own stock from Manila, Central America, etc. 

During the past week the ship G-alatea has arrived from Manila to 
Wm. T. Coleman &. Co., with 57,148 bags. This cargo w;xs ordered by 
Nicholas Luning, J). O. Mills and associates, for the San Francisco and 
Paciffc Refineries, expecting to fire up the same at the expiration of the 
monthly subsidy which has for years been paid them by Spreckles, Eg- 
gers & Co, to keep still and do nothing, in order that the Bay and Cali- 
fornia Refiners could the better contri>l things on this coast. But at the 
last moment Clans Spreckles and his associates concluded that they had 
too good a Sugar monopoly on this coast, and, after all their bluster, con- 
cluded to renew the subsidy and to assume the Sugar cargoes ordered by 
Messrs. Luning, Mills &. Co. It is now asserted that Claus Spreckles has 
leased from the Hawaiian G-overninent some 30,000 acres of land for the 
term of thirty years, which is to be converted into an immense Sugar 
plantation, costing large sums for irrigating, but which money will be 
forthcoming in due serson. The success which has thus far attended the 
operations of the Messrs. Spreckles at the Sandwich Islands, the past 
year or two — say a net profit of 8250,000 or more — is a strong incentive 
to go ahead and do still greater business with the Islanders, and we hope 
with like success to himself and his associates. Of course, the develop- 
ment of the islands will greatly increase our trade with Hawaii, under 
the operations of the Reciprocity Treaty, and which has already caused 
a great increase of traffic. 

The Bag monopoly is again in motion. It was thought, a week 
since, that the l^ng liad controled all of our large stock of Grain Sacks, 
say 12,000,000, but as soon as they advanced prices to 12c. cash, it was 
found that other parties were underselling them, and now it is asserted 
that within a week 1,500,000 22x3G Grain Sacks, Burlap standard, have 
been sold at ll^@llf^c. prompt cash. The combination have faith to be- 
lieve that they have at last got the whip-hand of the market and hope to 
control the stix;k for the balance of the season. As for ourselves, we take 
no stock in the enterprise, although we firmly believe that our surplus 
grain crop on the Pacific slope will be quite sufficient to furnish 500 ships 
of the largest tonnage with grain during the year before us. 

The Rice market has been quite unexpectedly and copiously sup- 
plied with two cargoes from Chiua during the week. The ship Titan, 
from Hongk»mg, way first to aiTive, wiih 3ii,732 mats, closely followed by 
the Great Admiral, from same, with 32^33 mats. This latter ship came 
over on steamer time, and was not expected for 30 days. The City of 
Tokio is now past due, with considerable more Rice, and these all tend to 
depress and demoralize the spot market, although previous to their arrival 
stocks were about exhausted. In addition to these heavy receipts from 
China, the Zealandia, from Honolulu, brought us some 3,000 bags ad- 
ditional, which latter we quote at 7c. for Choice Table. The price of 
China is altogether nominal, say 6-V@7c. 

CoaL — Imports from all pnrts continue liberal, and the market sadly 
demoralized by the large supplies daily arriving from the Coast and from 
British Columbia on the North. Within a day or two past a spot cargo 
of Wallsend sold at S5 S7A, and another to arrive, near at hand, at §6 and 
upwards. Previously the Bremen's cargo of 2,600 tuna, Welch Hartley, 
sold at or about S5 25®5 37 4, spot. 

Cement.— We note a sale of 1,000 bbls. English Portland Cement, ex 
ship, at S4, long time. 

Chemicals. — Imports by late arrivals have been liberal, but with little 
business. A sale at auction of 75 drums Caustic Soda was effected at S4 
27i@4 57^. 

Case Goods.. — Our local canners are actively engaged putting up large 
quantities of Peaches, Plums, Pears, etc. They have had a large crop of 
Blackberries and Strawberries to work upon, besides Apricots and other 
fruits in great abundance. We are glad to see that London is taking some 
of our choice Apricots, while the trade in the East Indies, etc., is for these 
choice fruits steadily growing. Honey is very plentiful and cheap. Dark 
strained has sold as low as to 3^ to 5c. j choice, 7c.; Comb, 10@12ic. for 
choice White. 



Salmon.— During the week past 2,000 cases 1-lb. tins, Columbia River, 
sold at SI 32^; 1,000 cases same sold on the River at SI 25 per dozen, 
equal at current rate of freights SI 27^. Some holders are now asking 
$1 35 per dozen. Each case holds four aozen. 

Quicksilver.— There has been an increased and active demand during 
the week for China, and it is said that some 1.500 flasks have been secured 
for the Beldc on the 1st prox. at 42@42.ic. Cablegrams from Hongkong 
quote the price at S63 per picul, and in London £7 5s. per bottle. 

I»ead.— Exports of pig lead continue to flow freely. The ship Young 
America, for New York, carried 042,358 lbs.; the City of Peking, for 
Hongkong, 41,706 lbs. same ; and the Alaska, for New York, via Panama, 
carried 140,054 lbs. same, also of Base Bullion 180,000 lbs. 

Winea— There continues to be a good Eastern demand for our Native 
product, and where care is taken in its selection good satisfaction is given 
to all consumers. 

Flour. — The export demand for China is active, with free sales at 
S4 25@S4 50 for Superfine; Extra Superfine, $4 75@S5 25: Bakers' and 
Family Extras, $5 50@S6 per 19G lbs— aU in cloth. 

Wheat— Purchases for export during the week have been large at 

51 65@.S1 67A per ctl. Millers pay §1 70@$1 72.V for choice. The de- 
mand exceeds the supply, causing large purchases 'to be made inland for 
early delivery. 

Barley, —There is a demand for good bright Chevalier, for export, but 
very little of this sort is raised here; 800 sks. fair quaL'ty sold at SI 55 
for Milling, but exporters would pny §1 GO for Choice. We quote Brew- 
ing at 81 15@S1 25; Feed, 90c. @S1 per ctl., which is a decline from last 
week's rate. 

Com.— Stock light, demand fair. Yellow, SI 90@S1 95; White. 

52 35@S2 40 per ctl. 

Wool. —Stocks of California fleece, light demand; good, sales at 14@ 

23c. ; good to choice Oregon, IS to 25c. 
Hides. -We quote Dry, li>A@16c.; Wet Salted, 8@9c, 
Tallow.— The demand is good for local use at 7'i@Sc. for good to 

choice; Refined, 9@9^c. 

Potatoes and Onions.— Supplies are liberal at Sl@l 40 ^ ctl. for the 
former, 95c. @S1 for latter. 

Hops.—There is very little doing, even at current low and nominal 
prices of 4@7c. 

Hay.—Supplies large and free at S7@14 ^ ton, according to quality. 

Freights and Charters. —We have a large supply of tonnage in port; 
disengaged, 47 vessels, 56,1% tons register; engaged and on the berth for 
grain, 46 vessels, 57,018 tons register. Few Charters and little new busi- 
ness offering. Freights nominal at 45@50s. 




THE COVENTRY MACHINISTS' CO., 

Coventry, Sngland. 
JU^anttfactitrers of tJtc Celebrated litod- 

ei'U Bicycles: 
" Coveiitry Kacer," 

"Gei]tKen«au''s Roailster,'' 

niid " Club Bicycle," 
Justly Ronomicd for their Durability, Elegante, 
Lightness and Speed. 

A. KONEKE & CO., Agents, 
July 0. 525 Front street. 



WAKELEE'S AUREOLINE 

Produces the Beautiful Golden Hair so much Admired. 

SUPERIOR TO THE IMPORTED AJiXICJCE 

— EV REASON OP irS— 

PBESHNESS ATJTt CARE USED IN ITS PRODUCTION. 

PRICE, X.JlRGE BOTTI.es, ^2. 

3ra7iufactured 6y S. P. WAKELEE & CO., Uruggists, comer 
Montffotnery and Bush streets, S. E. [July 20. 

NOBLE AND GALLAGHER. 

Importers and Dealers in Pnliitcrs* ainterials. House, Siarn 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 43S 
Jackson street, between Montgnnier>' and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomincd and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 13. 

WANTED. 

Good I^iveBasiiiess Men to set i tbe Excelsior Improved I<et- 
ter Copying Book. No press, brush or water used ; copies instantly. At^nts' 
outfit, S2.50. A^renU make from i^^lQ Ui $15 per day. Address Excelsior Manufac- 
turing Co.. 47 La SalW Street, Chicago, III. luconiorated Feb. IGth, 1S77. Capital, 
SIOO.OOO. Exclusive Temtory given. Jnly t>- 



FOR SALE, 



Completely farulshed. one of tlie ntost attractive places In 
MHNLo PARK. Finely laid out, with every variety of Fruit and t>rnamental 
Trees, and but five minutes walk from the station. Fine House, Stable and Out- 
buildings. Must be seen to be appreciated. Apply to 
April (5. THOMAS DA Y, 122 Sutter street. 

HARTSHbRN~~&r M'PHUN, 

Manafactnrers of all kinds of Window Siiades, Dealers lu 
Carpets, Oil Clotlis, Cuniieed, Window Laee. etc., 112 Fourth street, near Mis- 
sion. Factory ; Corner Bluxome and Fiftli streets. April 13. 

SANTA CRUZ. 

Apartments cousiatiii^ of t>vo bcilrooms and parlor, nicely 
furnished, with use of kiteUen, in a private f.-vmity. House and grounds close 
to sea-beach. Price, ;?40 per luouth. For particula rs apply at this office. July 29. 

SANTA CRUZ. 

Liddeirs Cottages, on tlie Bench. Pleasant and Commo- 
dious Rooms. Fine Scenery. $10 per Week. Surf Bathing Included. July 13. 



July 27, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVEUTISER. 



15 



REST. 

In groen oUl KaMeii!*, liiiMcn awav 

l''nnn si;,'bt of rt'vel uuil stnmi.1 of atrife, 

\Viu'i-e ttif bird iiiiiv fiiig t>ut h'w nouI ere he dies, 
Nor feun* f«ir tlie ii)i.'ht, so lie \i\v» hi« iliiy; 
Where tin* lu^th rcil wjiHs, which aro i^'inwiiiK amy 
With tbfif lichen aiul imwj* euihroiilerieti, 
Seem wully and sternly U> shut out Life, 
Xieeau&o it is uftou as sai.1 a» they; 
Wh«re even tlie bee has time to k^IAo 
(Gathering' ;ri»ilj' his honeyed store), 

Ki^'ht to the heart of the oM-world flow'rs— 
China-asters and purple stocks, 
l>;ihli;is auil UxW red hollyhocks, 

Laburnums raining' their eolden show'ts^ 
Colnmbiues prim of the folded core, 
And lupins, and larkspurs, aud " London pride," — 
Where the heron is waitin'^' amonj? the reods. 

Grown tame in the silence that reiyns around, 
Broken only, now aud then, 
By shy woodpecker or noisy jay, 
By the far-off watch-dog's mutHed bay; 

But where never the purposeless laughter of men. 
Or the seething city's murmuro\i8 sound, 
Will float up under the river-weeds. 
Here may I live what life I pleiise. 
Married and buried out of sight — 

Married to l^leasuro, and buried to Pain — 
Hidden away among scenes Hke these, 
Under the fsns of the chestnut trees ; 
Living my child-life c>ver again, 
With the further hope of a fuller delight. 
Blithe as the birds and wise as the bees. 
In green old gardens, hidden away 

From sight of revet and sound of strife — 

Here have I leisure to breathe and move, 
And to do my work in a nobler way; 
To sing my songs, and to say my say; 

To dream uiy dreams, and to love my love ; 
To hold my faith, and to live my life. 
Making the most of its shadowy day. 

— Viufct Fane, in the " World.*^ 

IS W^AR AN ANACHRONISM? 
It is worth ■while to re-exanime occasinually the ground of seemingly 
strong persuasions. When the foundation of a popular, or deeply cherished 
belief is sound such a scrutiny confirms confidence; if it is insecure, or rests 
upon an unstable base, the discovery cannot be regarded as a misfortune. 
Is war rational ? Is it expedient ? Does it really decide any dispute ? or 
B it not the arbitrament of the sword, apractical postponement of the issue, 
with the highest probability of its being revived. I have no intention of 
reproducing the stock arguments. The effort would not be pleasing; nor 
would the result prove edifying. Nevertheless, there is a shape in which 
the subject may with advantage engage attention, and perhaps excite 
new interest. Is war an anachronism ? The principle of war has not 
changed since the earliest instance of reasoning by force on record, A 
deraoustration is of course effective, only in so far as it signifies the power 
and the will under certain circumstances to employ the force paraded. 
The principle that right, real or imaginary, may and must be enforced by 
might, is one against which no valid reasoning will lie. Whatever may 
be the ease with individaals, natiims have no alternative but to maintain 
their interests and prestige by force. The principle of war is coercion. 
Nothing can change that principle. In its time war \vith the sword and 
mechanical weapons has conferred enormous services upon mankind, 
and done much to aid the progress of civilization. The qualities 
of courage, patience under suffering, and self-sacrifice, ]>hysical 
strength, with keenness of sight and accuracy of visual judg- 
ment, ingenuity, and many allied virtues, have been the 
products of war. No nation has long flourished in peace with- 
out degeneracy. This is the lesson of history. A people armed with the 
largest resources, and possessing the highest sldll and the greatest patri- 
otism, must in the long run be triumpaant. By surprise, treachery or 
superior address, vintnry may be seized by the least able, but it cannot be 
held securely. Keduced to its ultimate elements, the struggle has come 
to be a contest of rapidity in destroying und creating military and naval 
forces. Science, again, has made great advances and introduced a new 
method of forecasting the issues of war. The ceaseless struggle for supe- 
riority in armaments is not useless if it enables nations to measure their 
strength with that of their neighbors with approximate accuracy. Other 
matters germane to the^ssue— such as money, health, resources and thelike 
— ought to be well witliin the scope of the business faculty, and should be 
adequately appraised. It is, however, necessary that public opinion should 
itself be instructed in the weighting of inte^natinnal interests. To this end 
history, ancient and modern, ought to be studied more frequently. Popular 
ignorance is the source of perpetual peril. Aggressors are generally de- 
ceived or betrayed, but neither deception nor betrayal is possible when a 
nation is well informed. War is not of itself an anachronism, but its 
practice commonly contravenes the spirit and progress of the times. 
Might still dominates, and right is a secondary consideration, but knowl- 
edge is power — the power of self-restraint, which is the greatest of them 
all. There is nothing to strengthen, but much to weaken the power who 
prates incessantly of peace. Nations with small armies must on an emer- 
gency raise irregular troops — aud by such hirelings honor is sacrificed and 
independence lost. The only "peace possible to nations must be purchased 
at the price of maintaining armaments ready for war. w. B. 



St. John's Presbyterian, Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor.— The Rev. Dr. Scott, pastor, will preach on Sunday at 11 a. m. 
and 7i P. M. Public cordially invited. Prayer and praise service at 6^ 
P. M. Sunday School and Bible Classes, 9.^ A. m. 

Mr. Gladstone has been made a " shepherd." This is as it should be, 
for, ly hook or by crook, be generally makes his opponents look sheepish. 



CRADLE, ALTAR, AND TOMB. 



CRABLB. 

nKSHUN -In tliia city, July 20tli, to thu.«ifu of Iluriry nonnen, a son. 
(^UKihTKNHKN 111 Uiis iit>. .Inly Till, to tin; vvlfo tif Hciirv ChrintoiiHcn, a daughter. 
C.MU.KS In Diikl^iti.l, .Inly Itilli, tu ihe wife of J. \V. Ciirk-n, ii diiutrlitor. 
l>AVKMi>iiT- 111 tliid city. July COth, to tliu wife of W. IJ, l)avc'tii»ort, a son. 
FETrnav — In this city, July iid, to the wifo of Z. Kcttcrly, a sun. 
IIann'A -111 tliis city, July tld, to tlic wifn of P. N. Hannn, a sun. 
IIavs — In this city, July 2'2d, lo the wile of John Hays, u daughter. 
Lkrxahu -In this lity. July 22d, to the wife nf Tho«. Lcrnard, a son. 
LrcMsisoKR - 111 this city, .)uly Hth, Ut the wife of Jaenh LuchHingcr, a son. 
McNiLiy — In this city. July 21st, tti the wife of Michael MeNuIty, a daughter. 
Pkolkr— III tiiis rity. July 2lHt, to the wife of Tlios. TeiUcr. a dau^fhter. 
Saskky— III this lity, July •'Mi, U> the wife of jLTciiiiiih Saiikcy, a dauffhtcr. 
SciiAUT/.Kii- h, Hiis lily, July Sth, Ui the wife of J. A. Sdiartzer, a daughter. 
TuaNKii— In this tity. July 22d. to the wife of il. R. Turner, a son. 
Walcom— In this city, July ISth, t>:> the wife of ticorgu Waleoni, a son. 
WiKL— In tliis city, July 24th, to tiie wife of Lewis P. Wiel, a son. 

ALTAR. 

Bkntlbr-Leavitt— In this city, July 20th, F. B. Hcntlcr to Miss .T. E. Lcavitt. 
IJntKKLL-llAssKTT— In Uiis city, July 22(i, Edward H Burrell to Fannie E. Bassett 
Oiui.D-TMi'LKTr— Ir. this city. July 21st, Thos T. Cliild to Lillie J. Trijilett. 
CiiowLBv-UVAN— In this city, July 14th, Edward Crowley to L. Ilyan. 
UojUN-CoNKLiNQ-In this city, July 10th, Chnrles G, Co'din to I'liLehe J. Conkling. 
MiQXOLA-KoKTTuKii— In this eity, July 16th, John Jlignola to Elizabeth Rocttger. 
McCakty-Pukli's— In this eity, July 21at, Louis P. McCarty to Lilla D. Phelps. 
Stellixo-Schi'ltiieis— In this city, July ISth, Wm. Stelliiig to Nannie Seliultheis. 
TiioMAS-ZiiiLUARDT— In this city, Julv 2lst, J. Thomas Elise Zillhardt 
Zi.-iOBLMAMK-DoosB— In this city, July 20th, U. J. Zingelmann to Frieda A. Doose. 

TOMB. 

Arnold— In this city, July 23d, Elizabeth K. Arnold, aged 62 years and 9 months. 
BROCKHAN-In this eity, July 21st, Wm. H. Broekman, aged 60 years. 
Christisson— In this city, July 23d, Andru Christiiison. aged 45 years. 
Fi.N'SEGAN— In this city, July 2ad, Margaret Finncgan, aged Hi years. 
Fjsubr— In this city, July 23d, Louis Fisher, aged 2S years. 
Paustan— In this eity, July 2;id, Autonio Fauatan, aged 45 years. 
Haxrittv — In this city, July 2lst, Patrick Llanritty, aged 41 years. 
Lanz — In this eity, July 20th, Fanny Lanz, aged ^2 years, 
Maiioxey— In this city, July 22d, Bridget Mahoney, aged i8 years. 
McCartuy— In this city, July 22d, Mary McCarthy, siged 78 years. 
TiroMrsox— In this city, July 22d, Nelly Thompson, aged 28 years. 
Wn,LiA.MS— In this city, July 2:id, Wilhelmina E. Williams, aged 4 months. 
Wilson— In this city, July 24th, Mary Wilson, aged 74 years. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Tlie Couipaiiy^s steamers will sail as follous at 12 91.: 
CITY OF TOKIO. August 3d, for YUlvOHAJIA and HUNGKUNG. 

COLIMA. August Sth, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at MAZA.TLAN, 
SANBLAS, MANZANILLO and ACAPULCO, connecting at Acapuico with Compa- 
ny's Steamer for all Central American ports. Tickets to and from Europe by any 
line for sale at the lowest rates. 

ZEALANDIA, August 5th, at 12 o'clock, M., or on arrival of the English mails, 
for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. $10 additional is charged for pas- 
sage in Upper Saloon. 

DAKOTA, July 30th, for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, TACOMA, 
and OLYMPIA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for PORT- 
LAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing, at 
Wharf Office. Fur freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan sts. 

July 27. WILLIAMS, ELANCHARD & CO., Agents. 

OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY^ 

Direct Mail Line to PortlaiiLl ami Asturia.—Keg^nlar Steam- 
ers to PORTLAND, frcm San Francisco, leaving EVERY FIVE DAYS from 
Folsom-street wharf.— New Iron Steamships GEORGE W. ELDER, CITY OF CHES- 
Ti2R and OREGON, connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads 
and their connecting Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho 
Territories, British Columbia and Alsvska. Through Tickets at reduced rates to Ta- 
coma, Seattle and all points in Washington Territory. Freight received daily. For 
passage or freight apply at the olJice of the company, No. 210 Battery street. 
June 22. K. VAN OTERENDORF, Agent. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers ol this Coiupaiiy will sail from Broii«lway Wharf 
for PORTLAND. Oregon), every 5 days, direct, and for LOS ANGELES, SANTA 
BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ, SAN DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Pajicrs. 

Ticket omce, No, 214 Montgomery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
March 16. No. 10 Market street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First aud Kran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAIiLA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC Thursday,May Ifjth, Friday, Aug. ICth, Saturday', Nov. 16th. 

OCEANIC Tuesday, June ISth. Tuesday, Sept. 17th, Tuesday, Dec. I7th. 

EELGIC Thursday, August 1st, Wednesday, October ICth. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 2 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacilic Mail Steamship Company's Wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gcnei-al Passenger Agent. 
DAVID P. COLTON. President. Jub' 27. 

SHORTEST, 

Most Direct and Convenient Line Between Sonoma and 
San Francisco. 

The new anrt elcg-ant steamer "Sonoma," Captain Stofen, 
Commanding, will leave Sonoma Landing every MONDAY, WEDNhSDAY and 
FRIDAY at S am. Returning, will leave Jackson-street wharf, San Francisco, 
every TUESDAY, THURSDAY and SATURDAY at 12:30 p.m. Passage, §1 50. For 
Freight apply on board. ^____ May 4^ 

IN CONSEQUEN"cE^~OF SPURiOUS IMITATIONS 

Of I-KA * I'EltKSsrS- SAi:tE. wliicli tire cnleulate.l to de- 
ceive the public, tEA AND VEKKIJiS have adoiJtetl A NLW LABtL 
BEARING THKIK SIGNATURE, LEA & I'ERRINS, which is placeS on every botlle 
nf W0RCESTER,SH1RE SAUCE, and without which none isgenume. 

Ask tor LEA Sc PERKINS' Sauce, and see name on wTapiwr, label, bottle and st^p- 

pjr Wholesale and for export by the proprict'.rs, Worcester ; Crosse & Riackwell. 

Loudon, etc. . etc., and by grocers aud oihiien throughout the world. To be obtained of 

Doc. i. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., San Francisco. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Jnly 27, 1878. 



REAI. ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco. California, for the 
two Weeks ending July 23, 1878. 

Compiled from the Hecurds of the Mercantile Affejwy of John McKUlop tfe Co.^ 
401 California Street^ JSan Francisco, 



Thursday. July 18th. 



GKAJfTOR AND QBANTBE. 



G W Honseley to E T Bocknam. , 

SnnDy Viilc lid to Lucy tStuith 

Murg Bries to Mary Howe 

C G Atbearn to Marv A Athcaro. 

Wm Ilollis to W H Barret 

J C Weir to Minna Dobrzensliy.. 



A Hollnh to Bernard Kramer 

G E Wliitney to Frk Cunningham, 
Jas A Wallace to Wm Trceu 



V Wackenrendor to City & Co S F 

JohnEhrman to Same 

Samuel Irving to Same 

John Kelly to Jno Donovan 



DESCRIPTION. 



Lot 2.370, Gia JLip No 3 

Lol 12. blk 11, Snony Vale IJoraeetead 

E cor29tti av and I. so 75x100 

S\v McAllietrr and Lacuna, w 108:fis79 
Sw Paciflc and Octuvia, w 3(10x127:8 hi . 
E Fillmore, !17:8';i s Washington, 8 30 x 



137:6.. 



S Tyler, 1C5 w Laguna, w 80x120 

Same 

N Haywood and Louipa, nw 40. ne 57:6, 

nw :30, ne 20, 9w77:6 lo beginning,.,. 
Lot 13S and pt lots Si, 139,88, 133, Haley 

JIapl 

Lot 27, 15th Av Extenpion 

Part lot 1172, 15th Av Extension 

Se Brannan, 175 aw 4th, sw 25x120 



pniCE 



J 2 

309 

1 

Gift 

30,000 

4,B00 
4,500 



18,000 

160 

5 

35 

3,200 



Friday, July 19th. 



"Wm Hollis to George Tonens,, 

Same to Jno W Salter 

Same I o Chaa A Parsons 

II W Stein to P Roscnblum 



A C Diggens to J C Diggens 

R R Av Hd Asen to Jas Lebtrange 

JnoG Beck to Sosan Beck 

F W Pierce to Elizth T Everett. . . 
Edw Martin to Hih Sv and Ln Soc 
Mary A Pierce to Elinth T Everett 

Wm Hale to Same 

Jos F Hall to Wm Alvord 

E CAf^otoChas E Case 

A W Scott to Edward F Ohm 

.JnoWerion to Catherine .Morion., 
Andw Thompson to Wm Hosford. 



N Clay, 1:37:6 w Hyde, w 137:6x137:0..., 

W Valencia, l.-jl s aist, s 27.'i90 

N Hill. 250 w Valencia, w 30x114 , 

Se Sanchez and Vulture, e 105x57 

S Bush, 103 e Broderick. e 103:3x137:6. 

Lot 30, blk 52 

S Pine, 81:3 e Steiner, e 25x127:6 

E Webster, 55 s California, s 82:6x81:3, 
Nw Main and Harrison, nw 137:6x137:6, 
E Webster, 55 s California, s 82:6x81:3,. 

Same 

Ne Crooks, 137:0 nw Townsend, ne 55:3 
Xl37:~ 



S 31»i, 250 w H. w 25x100 

Ne Union and -lones, e 20x77:6 

Lot 221, Spring Valley Homestead 

B Fillmore, 175 n Haight, s 175, e 1.51:6, 
n.37:6, nw to beginning 



* 5 

4,200 

4,592 

800 

5 

350 

Gift 

6,000 

10 

1 

6 

2,600 

360 

5 

Gift 



Saturday, July 20th. 



Geo Edwards to P Mary Schmidt. 

Same 10 Dominick Lindner 

Same to Christian P Little 

Samuel Abrams to Jos Bremer... 

F M Dober to Geo A Ross 

Theo Green and wf to!»H Michaels 
D A McDonald toGeo F Beveridge 

Geo Mearns to E W Burr 

Jno McDermott to T G McLeran. . 



David Porter to Jas La wson 

Gnstave Maheto Henry Meaenbur; 
BE Anger to Henry Barroilhct..., 
F G Barton etal to E Raaa 



Thop C Edwards to Jas E Gordon 
Theo Von Borsiell to Alexr Weill, 
H B Howell to Geo H Chiistian... 
H P Liverroore to Chas It Story. . . 

Jas Mulcahy to Catherine Stanton 
M Breman to R Cunningham 

W B Swain to Catherine Stanton , 
Unknown Owners to W B Swain, 
H W Kurlbanm to Bridget Rolin,. 
Theresa Casulloto G B Tinnochio 

Wm Brennan to R Cunningham., 



W Fair Oaks, 183 n 22d. n 22x117:6 

225 " n 19x117:6 

205 " 1120x117:0 

N Post, 82:0 e Franklin , c 27:6x120 

E Dolores. 51:6 s Vallev, s 25x100 

S 17lh, 200 e Dolores, e 2.5x100 

W Devisadero, 105:4X n Clav, n 25x120. 

N Filbert, 31 e Steiner, cl0xl22 

Se 15th and Harriet, e 158. s 153:11 !:i, w 
7:6. s 12:1 !i. w 72:9 !i, s 3:11^4". w lo2d 
av, n 170 to beginnint; 

N Sacramento, 81:3 e Devisadero, e 60 x 
127:8'4 

N Harrison, 220 e 6th, e 25x85 

S 14th, 20Oe Sanchez, e 25x125 

All property, real and personal, for ben- 
efit of creditors 

S 2:ld, 125 w Dolores, w 24x100 

NoTvleriintI Broderick. n 137:0x137:6.. 

N Clay, 175 w Polk, w 50xI27:8Jf 

Se Castro and M, e .380, s 114, w 175, s 
114, n 26:6, w 105, n 201:6 to beginniug 

W Kentucky, 250 o Colusa, n 2.5x100,... 

Nn e 1 of 50 V 376, 40 s fr ne cor sd lot, 
s20.x57:0 

W Kentucky, 250 u Colusa, n 25x100 

W Kentucky, 125 8 Yuha, s 75x100 

Se Perry, 153:6 nc 3d, ne 24x75 

S Union, 1SS:3 w Kearny, el7:9, s 57:6, 
w 17, s 2:6, w 1 It, n OOto beginning.. 

On e line of 60 v 376, 40 s fr neof sd lot, 
B 20x67:6 



$2,300 
1,900 
1.900 
13,000 
600 
5,000 
6,700 
1 



3,000 

5 

109 

1 
3,550 
6.000 
6,100 

10 
350 

2,300 

40 

4 

3,000 

1,302 



Monday, July 22d. 



Henry Hnttmann to T J Hultmann Nw Tara, 182 sw Geneva av, sw 44:6 x 
103:6 

Domingo Valencia to Wm Hollis. Sw Steiner and O'Farrell, w 92:0x b 25, , 

Jos Alexander to Jas S Kennedy. Se Post and Gough, e 55x120 

E B Eddy to Same |Sw Noa»and Beaver, w 135i s 115 

Thos M.'igee to W Cradock and wfl W Devisadero, 110:6>^ s Geary, s 27:0Jsi 
x90 

JnoM Schtrilt to M O nines |SeNoe and 2lBt, el06x 8 07 

Emma Beckman to G Barmeister. . jUnd X n Grove, 110 e Octavia, e 27:6 x 
6S:9 

United Land Assn to JasDean....lW Howard, 1:35 n 17th, e 122:6 x s 24.... 

Juanita WuldeiertnC Montgomery I W cor Folsum and Moss, sw 55x80 

JasC Weir to Susan Bruce E Fillmore, 72:2ii s Washington, s25x 

I 91:6 



$ 400 

10,500 
5,000 

6,180 
250 

1 
600 
200 

4,500 



Tuesday, July 23d. 



Jennie Kennedy to J Meussdorfcr 
.Tas Kally to Sav and Ln Society.. 
Henry VVegeuer to Louisa Briody. 



Wm Hale to Edwd J Healev 

Odd Fell Cem Asn to H M Dahler, 
Jno Dowllngto JooM Donald 



Jno M Dowling to Jno Dnwling... 

Bridget Lee to John Chisnnil 

Lawrence Ryan to Bridget L Ryan 

Jus C Weir io S Uampodonico 

Edwd Cohn to Henry Keuilzer.... 
W F Cashmun to Henry Mahan. . . 

Geo F Belden to Josiali Belden 

D A McDonald lo J F Hill 



Se Castro and 14th, e 100 x 8 50 

Se Nntoma, 90 sw 11th, sw 25.\S0 

Commencing 73:0 e Hyde, 79 s Lombard 

s 58:0 X e21 

NwPineand Lnguna. w 137:6.xl.37:6.... 

Lot 43. Germania Section plat 7 

Und }4 c Scott, 106:6 s O'Farrell, s 31 x 

8 1:37:6., 



Undivided M same 

S Green, 1,57:6 w Hvdc, w 20x77:0 

W Calhnnn. 08:9 D Green, n 22:11x91:8.. 

E Scott, 79.6 8 O'Farrell, s 27x1 14 

N Bush, 137:6 c Sausome, e 20x80 

Se Turk and Isl av. e 426:2, 6 276, w 
454:11. n tn beginning 

Und 1-5 of S B blks 38, .39 

Se 22d and Sanchez, s 2:3, e 100, s 225, e 
21:6, n UIO, w 13:6, u 28, c 17, n 100. w 
125 to beginning 



$1,900 
2.853 

1 

5 

110 

2.100 
2.100 
1.400 
Gift 
3,800 
41,000 



8,000 



TO LET. 

QUEEN'S THEATER, DUNEDTN, NEW ZEALAND. 

This elegant anil commo'.liona Tbenter, situated In the 
main thoroughfare in the heart of the larcest city hi New Zealand, can be ob- 
tained for long or short dates on very moderate tenns. From its central position, it 
always commands large and fashionable audiences to legitimate entertainments and 
first-elass talent. The interior has recently been sumptuously furnished, Dress Circle 
and Stalls having partitioned seats in Utreeht Velvet and Leather, and other appoint- 
ments of the most approved kind. The stage is well furnished with Sccuic Proper- 
ties, and the necessary requirements tor Opera, Concert or Drama, 

The building has been pronounced the best, ventilated and most comfortable Theater 
iu the Australasias, Seating accommodation, 1,600, AH rates, water and gas are 
included in the hiring. 

Population of Duncdin and suburbs, about 26,000. 

Correspondence and communications invited from friends, responsible managers, 
etc. For terras and dates apply to GEORGE R. WEST, 

Theatrical and Concert Agent, Music Warehouse, Dunedin, N. Z., Sole Agent, 

Where ail professional correspondence can be addressed, and advice or information 
obtained. .^ July 20. 

SODA! SODA! 

SCHWEPPE'S SODA WATEE! 

With HENNESSY BRANDY, forms a perfect combination. 
SCHWEPPES TONIC WAT;E! 

The most pure .and perfect appetizer known. 
SCHWEPPE'S POTASS WATEB! 

A sure cure for dj'spepsia. 
SCHWgPPE'S MALVERN SEITZEK! 
Bottled at the celebrated Malvern Springs, Worcestershire ; highly recommended 
by all Physicians. I. SCHWEPPE A- CO., 

Berners auil Oxfora streets, liOndon. 
Regular Consignments received by BENJ. F. E.ILEY, 

July 13. 318 Front st. , up stairs. 

THE BERKELEY GYMNASIUM, 

A Preparatory School to the "University. 

A first-class Boarding- Scbool, establlsheil jii the Interests 
of hi^'her education, and in opposition to the craniinint' system of the small 
colle^'es and military academics of the State. The next term will commence July 
24th. Examination of candidates for admission July 22d and 23d. By request, in- 
structions have been provided duriot; the Summer months for students preparing- for 
the August e.«:ami nations at the University. 

For catalot'ues or particulars address JOHN F. EURRIS, Berkeley, Cal. 

Note. — Wk desire to call special attention to the organization of our Grammar De- 
partment, separate from the Academical, and solicit the patronay;e of parents and 
guardians of small boys. June 8. 

THE NEW GYMNASIUM. 

Atbletic Cnrriciilain, Ho. 333 Salter street, T. tt. C. A. 
Building. San Francisco. Prof. ALFRED PERRIElt, Teacher of Athletics; 
Mens. A. VAUTHIEE, Assistant Teacher of Athletics; Prof. UAKRY MAYNAED, 
Teacher of Boxing. The Best Appointed Gymnasium on the Pacific Coast. Open 
Daily (Sundays e.>;cepted) from 10 o'clock a.m. to 5::10 P.M., and from 7:30 to 10 P.M. 
Terms— PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Adults, «2 per month. Boys and Misses under 
10 years of age, $1 per month. Lessons in Bo.xing and Fencing, Extra. June 22. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, 

Washin^on, Alameda County, California. 

The Thirteenth Seiul-Aniinal Term of this iustitntlon will 
commence on THURSDAY, August 1st, 1878. For fidelity and ability in 
teachers, for puqioses of a solid, practical education, and for healthfiilness and beauty 
of surroundings, this institution will compare favorably with any on the Pacific 
Coast. For catalogues and further information, address 
July 6. S. S. HARMON, Principal. 

MILLS' SEMINARY. 

This vrcll-kuown Institution for Yonng: liailies will com- 
menee its next term WEDNESDAY, July 3lst. With its fine commodious 
buildings, its ample grounds, and its largo and etiiciont corps of Teachers, the insti- 
tution offers unrivaled advantages for a thorough and finished education. All letters 
of inquiry and all communications relative to aidmission should be addressed 

RKV. C. T. MILLS. 
June 22. Brooklyn, Alameda county, California. 

REMOVAL 

The Office of the Oolden Chariot Miuiuisr Company, ninna 
Gold and Silver Mining Company, Golden Gate Con. Hydraulic. Mining Com- 
pany, Minnictta Belle Silver Mining Com|jany, and Hazard Gravel Mining Company, 
has removed from Room 22, Merchants' Exchange, to 

Booms 13 and 14. 318 Fine Street. 
July 13. J. T. McGEOGHEGAN. Secretary. 

REMOVAL. 

Laver & Curlett, Architects, fnrnlsh Plans» SpeclScatious 
and Superintendence for the Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Houses, 
and every description of Building. Office : 19 S. F. Stock Exchange Building, Pine 
street, San Francisco. [Take the Elevator,] June 15. 

REMOVAL. 

Eclwaed S. Spear A Co., Auctioneers, will remove Jnly 1st 
to No. 729 Market street, between Third and Fourth, opposite Dui»ont. Reg- 
ular Sale Days— Wednesdays and Saturdays. July 6. 



H. 



REMOVAL. 



W. Patrick, Teacher of the Piano, lias moved his res- 
idence to 113 PAGE STREET, San Francisco. July 13. 



F 



QUICKSILVER. 

orsale— In lots tosnit, by Thomas Bell, No. 305 Sansome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



F' 



GOOD BOYS. 

lor any service may he hail without charges at the Tonth's 

Free Directory, 1417 Howard street. [May 11.] A, P. DIETZ, Agent. 



w 



ALICE ROSE, 



ooil Eng:raver, 606 Slout^omery street. Boom 31, third 

story, San Francisco. April 6. 



Julv 27, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



nw OF TH£ MSHBEBe 
OF THE S. F. STOCK 
AND EXCHANGE 
fiOABD. 

; p. l>i:<'KIIAn - l*rrN 
I. 1>. Illl.l. • -- V. VrvH. 
I. II. <'01T <'lliilriunii. 

, M. NllOTnKI>I.-Trra. 

ON. 1*. UI.\i« Svc'y. 

.Oftin, Alexander, or J. H. 

Wiilkor & Co 3U3MoDlt:'y. 

rown.J.W 4l6Ciira. 

orling & firo . 405 Callfuruia. 
loswellft Co., 8. B...318 Cara. 

thill, E ■iO^ Montsutnery. 

oleman, Jas- V -taacalifornia. 

reenebaum. J Momg'yst. 

tall. Ed. r 410 California. 

ones, J. H S20 Pino. 

ling, Jos. L Pine street. 

oble, H. H 435 California. 

real, Chos. S 380 Monls'y. 

'eckham,E.P....3n Montg'y. 

'aterson, Jaa :J13CaI'a. 

hotwell, J. M 311 Montg. 

COtt, H. H...8U7 MotDffomcry. 
Vakefield, 8. B 3U Pine. 



FEW OF THE MEMBERS 
OF THE PACIFIC STOCK 
EXCHANGE BOABD. 

C. I.. WEI.I.ER - - Pres. 
B. (■AICDIXKR-V. Pres. 
A. J. MOimER.Sec'y. 
JOS. TirOCX - Chair^ii. 
. WSIITEI.T - - -Treas. 
W.T.ATWOOD -A. Sec. 

Bourne, J. B. . ll6Halleckst. 

Baird, Andrew- .304 Callforoia 
IDodge, George S..Ncvoda Blk. 
.Hoight, Ira G. 12 Stevenson B. 

Hunt & Goates 318 Cal'a. 

Marks, Joseph, 228 Montgy. 

Martin, M. S...- 307 California. 

N eal, Charles S 330 Monig. 

iXaylor, A. C 415 Monljr'y. 

iTyng, Geo.. .309 California st., 
Booms 8-9. 



FOREIGN POSTAGE. 

Tlio firat column dcnotca the 
l">-i:r,^c on letters and the last 
.■"luiitri the postage ou ncwspa- 
l"-Ts, in cents : 

All. tralia, via England, . ..15 4 

An-Malia, via San Fran'co.. 5 2 

AuM.ria 5 2 

liLMzil, via England 21 4 

I'.iiiisli Columbia 3 1 

(.■;uuuia 3 1 

Chile, Brit'h mail, via CoIon.l7 4 

China, via England 15 4 

China, via San Francisco. . .10 4 

East Indies, via S. Fran'ixj-.IO 4 

France, via Eng-., prepaid. . . 5 2 

German States, prepaid ... 5 2 

Great Britain, half ounce.. . 5 2 

Havana direct 5 

Japan 5 2 

Mauritius 10 4 

Mexico direct 10 1 

N. Zealand, via South pton. 15 4 

N. Zealand , via Brindisi 19 6 

N. S. W., via England 15 4 

N. S. W., via San Fran'co . .12 2 

Panama 5 2 

Peru, British m'l, viaColon.17 4 

Prussia direct 5 2 

Russia direct -5 2 

Spain 5 2 

Sandwich Islands e 

West Indies direct 5 2 

Postage should be prepaid. 



THE NEWS LETTSB'8 

HOTEL DIRECTOBY 

Throughout Europe. America 

Etc., Etc. 
NoTB. — Tub Nawe Lbttbr 18 

UEtU'LAKLY MAILRUTO EAOB 
lluTUL IN Tllie UHT. 

Athens.- Hotel d'Anf:lctorre. 

Baiihauoe!>.\V. I.-Alblou Iloiol. 

Bbulin.— Hotel Royal, Untcr 
den Linden, No. 3. 

Bausn-Bauen.— Hotel de Hol- 
la nde. 

Weipbaden.— Hotel Rose. 

Munich.— Hotel Bollevao. 

Drespss.— Victoria Hotel. 

Vienna.— Grand Hotel. Grand 
National Uoiel. Grand Ho- 
tel de la Oour d'Aulriche. 
Hotel Kaiserin Elizabeth. 

Geneva. — Graud Hutel de la 
Pnix. Hotel Beau Rivage. 

Paris.— Hotel Meuricc, 228 Hue 
do Rivoli. Grand Hotel de 
Lonvre. Hotel London. 

Bouloone-sui^meu, France. - 
Hotel Dc8 Bains. 

Bordeaux. — Grand Hotel de 
France. 

Marseilles.— Grand Hotel de 
Marseille. 

LTON3.— Hotel de PEarope. 

Nice.— Grand Hotel Cbauvaln. 

BllusSELS.— Hotel de Europe. 

OsTEND.— Bath Hotel. 

The Hague.— Hotel Panlez. 

Genoa. — Great Hotel of Italy 
and Cross of Malta. 
Hotel de la Vllle. 

TtTBiN.-Grand Hotel Troinbetta 

Milan.— Hotel de la Vllle. 
Hotel Pozzo. 

CoMo.— Hotel de la Eeined'An- 
Cletcrre. 

Florence.— Hotel New York. 

Venice. -Danieli's Royal B ^ 

Hoicl Victoria. 

Leghorn. — Victoria and Wash- 
ington Hotel. 

Rome.— Hotel d'Allemacne. 

Naples.- Washmglon Hotel. 

Palermo. — Hotel Central, 

Cordova.— Fonda Sniza. 

Seville. — Fonda de Paris. 

St. Petersburou. — Hotel De 
math. 

Moscow.— Sclavonic Bazaar. 
St. Nicholas Hotel. 

Constantinople.— Hotel d'An- 
glelerre, 

London.— Bridge House Hotel. 
London B. 
Lan^haiD Hotel, Portland PI. 
Morley'f Hotel, Trafalgar Sq. 

Leamington.— Regent Hotel. 

Liverpool.-- Washington Hotel, 
Lime street, 

NoTTiNGHAM.—Maypole Hotel. 

Birmingham. — The Great West- 
em Hotel, Snow Hill Station. 
The Hen and Chickens Hotel. 
The Stork Family Hotel and 
Posting House, Old Square. 

Sheffield.— Royal Hotel. 

St.-Laavrence-6n-Sea, Rams- 
gate.— The Granville Hotel. 

Pltmottth.- Duke of Cornwall 
Hotel. 

Chepstow, — Beaufort Arms Ho- 
tel. (Tintem Abbey, Smiles.) 

DcBLiN. — The Hibernian Hotel. 
Shelboume Hotel. 

Edinburgh. — Douglas Hotel. 
The Balmoral Hotel. 

Glasgow. — Queen's Hotel. 

Cork.— Imperial Hotel, 

Killarnbt. — Royal Victoria 
Hotel. 

Montreal.— Ottawa Hotel. S. 
C. Brown, manager, 

Ottawa. — Russell House, 

ToBONTC— The Q,neen's Hotel, 
Front street, Rossia House, 
E. P. Shear, Proprietor. 

Quebec- iatadacona Hotel. 

Halifax.— White Swan Hotel. 

WASHtNGTON, D. C— Arlington 
HouB<?, Imperial Hotel, Eb- 
bitt House. 

Baltimore,— Carrolton House. 

New Yorf.— " The Windsor," 

Vera Cruz. — La Casa de Dili- 
gen ciae. 

Mexico, — Hotel Itnrbide. 

Guadalajara. — Hotel Hidalgo. 

Mazatlan. — Iturbide Hotel, 

Lima. — Maury's Hotel, Calle de 
Bodcgoneu, 

Valparaiso, -Hotel Roma, Calle 
de Cochrane, 

Santiago de Chile. — Banosde 
Coliraa, Hotel Santiago, 

Rio de Jan.— Cftfe Americano. 

Stdnet.— Royal Hyde Park Ho. 

Melbourne.- Albion Hotel. 

Cape op Good Hope. -Port Eliz- 
abeth, Phwis Hotel. 

Tahiti.— Faa, Hotel de Paris. 

Japan.— Y=ddo, Yeddo Hotel. 

Honolulu.— Hawaiiau Hotel. 



TH£ NEWS LETl'EB 

(8 roBWAKt>Kl>, fRKl'AID.KVItlt'l 

SaTCKHAV.TO TUK FOLLOWINW 
AltUKKSHRH AM) I'LACKB OF 
lUl»lNKM»llKW»KTrUllOl!UHOlJT 
Tint WiUll.H:— 

Adelaide— Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Amstordam— Hiipo & Co. 

Antwerp — La Bourse. 

Alexanaria- /iziuia Freroe. 

AucJtland— Chamber of Com- 
merce: L'i>'.ou Bros. 

AtKtrdoen— Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Arizona— A. J, Fiulay; MartMc- 
Icney, J S. Manaileld. 

Berlin — Morchante' Exchange; 
Taylor & Co. 

Baltimore — iialtiinore llcpuhtican 
Merchants' Exchange, 

Boston- Merchants' Exchange, 

Bordeaux— J. Lanazeinth & File; 
Barton A: Guestier ; Pierre 
Schroder Ji: Co. 

Birmingham— Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Bombay— Commercial Bank of 
India; Chamber of Commerce, 

Batavia— Commercial Society ; 
Martin, Dyee fit Co; Dummler 
& Co. 

Buenos Ayres— Chamber of Com- 
merce; Zimmerman, Fair & Co. 

Bristol- Commercial Room*. 

Belfast— Commercial Exchange, 

British Columbia— The Govejmor 
of British Columbia. 

Canton— Jardiuc, Mathc8on& Co 

Oonstantinople — BaltozziFreres, 
Jacques, A Ileon & Co. 

Cape of Good Hope — Commercial 
Reading Rooms. 

Calcutta — Chamber Commerce; 
Commercial Bank of India ; 
Whitney Brothers & Co. 

Oailao — English ReadingRoom. 

Copenhagen — Hoyal Exchange ; 
Bocrsen. 

Colombo— Chas. Shand & Co. 

Dunedin — Chamber Commerce. 

Dublin — Commrrcial Building, 

Edinburgh- Chamber Commerce 
and Manufacturers. 

Frankfort— N. M. Rothschild & 
Sous. F. Livingstone; L. Liv- 
ioL'Stone. 

Glasgow— Chamber Commerce 
and Manufacturers, 

Gibraltar— Turner & Co. 

Hamburg— Lutterroth & Co.; H. 
J. Merck &c Co.; Carl Heine ; 
Borsenhalle, 

Havre— yuesnd Freres et Cie; 
Wanner, Laii^er & Co; C Du- 
bois &i Co; Banque Commer- 
cial e. 

Honolulu— Wilcox, Richards & 
Co; Aldrich, Walker & Co; H 
W.Whimey. 

Havana— Crawford, Beq ; H. B. 
M.'s Consal. 

Jamaica — Middleton & Co. 

Jersey, England — Commercial 
Reading Rooms. 

London — Chairman of London 
StockExchange; Lloyde; Gov- 
ernor of the Bank of England; 
Gunn i: Co; Roth.'ichildB; Bank 
of London; Baring, Bros & Co: 
Delizy, Davies & Co; " Public 
Opinion," "Graphic," "Court 
Journal,'" newi'papers; Pri- 
vate Secretary of (j^ueen Victo- 
ria ; Gov, Stock Investment 
Co..33CornhilI. 

Lima— William Gibbs & Co; Al- 
Bop & Co; Huth, Grunning & 
Co; Bates, Stokes & Co; Gra- 
ham, Rowe & Co ; Farmer & 
Company. 

Liverpool— Chair-rei Co nmerce; 
E.Kendall; Liverpool \. eneral 
Brokers' Association, 

Leeds— Chamber of Commerce; 
Cloth Hall. 

Lisbon — Unias Commercial. 

Madrid— P'rancisco de P. Retor- 
tillo ; Excellent issimo Don 
Jose de Salamanca. 

Mexico — Barron, Forbes & Co; 
Theodore La Cadie & Co. 

Marseilles— Pascal, Fillis & Co; 
Roun de Fraissint. 

Manchester— Chamber of Com 

Melbourne- James Henty & Co; 
Chamber of Commerce; Grice, 

5 umner & Co : McC ulloch ?p Co 
Madras — Binney & Co ; Cham- 
ber of Commerce; C. Shand 
&Co. 

Mauritius — .Tames Leiechman & 

Co; Chamber of Commerce, 

Montreal— St. James' Club. 

Manila — Martin, Dyce & Co: 

Peele, Hubbell & Co ; Russell 

6 Stnrgis; Patterson, Morgan 
& Co. 

Mazatlan— Kelly Wyrtle & Co, 
New York— C'hamber Commerce; 
Astor House ; "The Wind- 
sor ;" St. Nicholas Hotel ; 
Filth Avenue Hotel, James 
R. Keene, 



Nassau (New I*rovidonco)— H . 

Adderly & Co. 
Nevada— F. Boeple, agent, Vir- 
ginia Cityi vV. GoodLian, 

PI Che. 
Oporto— Banco Alianca. 
Odessa — Rftfalowich & Co; C. 

Zuckerbecker & Co. 
Oregon— Henry Boyd. 
Paris — Clmrles L' Gay. 
roiiii do Kjr^Ai-u — James Black. 
Panama— Francisco Alvarez. 
HioJaneiro- Wright, Muxwell& 

Co; Ctimmereial Exchange. 
St. Petersburgh— Stelglitz & Co. 
Singapore— Rawson As Co; Mar- 
tin, Dyce & Co; Chamber ol 

Commerce, 
Sydney — C'hamber of Commerce; 

Robert Town & Co; Gilchrist, 

Watt & Co. 
Southampton— Royal Mail S. S, 

Company. 
Shanghai— P. M. S. S. Co. 
Toronto— The Bank of Britiflb 

North America. 
Vienna— M. L. Bicdcrman & Co; 

S. H. Stamnlz & Co. 
Valparaiso— Cross & Co; Alsop 

& Co ; Wm. Gibbs & Co ; 

Huth, Gruning & Co; Graham, 

Rowe & Co. 
Vera Cruz— British Consul. 
Victoria (V. I.)— Bank of British 

Columbia , 
Victoria (Hongkong) — Bosman & 

Co; Jardinc, Mathison & Co; 

Dent & Co; Russell & Co; 

Augustine Heard & Co; Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 
Washington (D. C.)— Willard'e 

Hotel, 
Yokohama — Jardine, Mathison 

& Co; Commercial Bank of 

India. 



CONSULAB GOBFS. 

ABGaNTiNH Rhpublio— Consul— 
Chas. Buum.oiu Batterv street. 

A.USTKO-HUNGAEIAN EilPIKK — 

Acting Officer, A. Rosenthal, Wl 
Battery. 

BELGiuii — Consul General — S. 
Morhauge, Grand Hotel. Con- 
sul. E.Grisar.N. W. cor. fifth 
and TowDsend sts. . 

Bolivia — Consul— F.Herrera, 331 
Montgomery street. 

CuiLi—Consul General— F, Se- 

Siindo Casauueva, U. S. Court 
uildlng. 
CosTA Riga -Consul General— 

T. Lemmen Meyer, S.W. corner 

Front and Jackson. Consul — 

Maria Sinow, 323 Front st. 
DENMAnK — Consul— N. Sonnich- 

sen, 315 California street. 
Ecuador— Acting Goneul- F. 

Hcrrera. 3ai Montgomery st. 
Fbance — Consul G'-.nerai— Mon. 

Anloine Frost, 704 Wash'n st. 
Great Britain— W. L.Booker, 

Consul. Charles Mason Vice- 
Co nsul. 
Guatemala— Consul-General — 

Wm. Kouh, 123 Cal'a st. 
German Empire— Gonaul-Gen.— 

Adolph Rosenthal, 321 Eatterj'. 
Greece- Consul— EmiJe V. but- 
ter, S. W. cor. Montgi; Comc'l, 
Hawaiian Islands — Uonsu! — 

Henry W. Severance. 4U5 Front. 
Honduras- Consul — Vacant, 
Italy—CohbuI— Count D, Barri- 

les. Front and Jackson, 
Japan — CodbuI — Kentaro Yana- 

gia, S.E. corSrcl & Marke'., 
MEXico-Mi guel G. Prltchard 

Acting Consul, 21ft Sansome. 
Netherlands— Consul — J. De 

Fremery, 110 Sansome street. 
NiOiRAGUA— Consnl-General- 

F. Herrcra. S;^i Montgomery st. 
Peru- Consul General — F. de la 

Fuente y Sulurat, 510 Battery. 
Portugal— ConBul— Francis Bcr- 

ton. Vice Consul- H. Laidley, 

S2T Clay st. 
KussiA — Consul Imperial — M. 

Vladimir deWeletsky, 7 South 

Park. 
Spain— Consul — Camilo Martin, 

London and S. F.Banlt. 
San Salvador— Consul, vacant. 
Sweden and Noewav— Consul, 

AuEustusBerggren, 4% Montgj'. 
Switzerland —Consul— Francis 

Berton, 527 Clay. Vice-Consul, 

Antoine Borel.HOl Montg'y st. 
Turkey -Consul— Geo. W ulbbB, 

33 Fremont atniet. 
IT. S. op tioLOuBiA- Consul- F. 

Herrcra, 331 Mnntg'y Bt. 
Venkzukla — Coiifiui Ricaido 

Morales. 10 California street 



BANES & COMPANIES 
Oonneotea with the Far Eaat* 

Tub News LKTraii is uroplau 

LY MAILKI> T.' ALL fV THE KoL- 
LOWl.su (■i.MJ'ANIKh: 

i'ciihiMuiiir imd OrlentBl Steam 
NavlKiillcii Cu.. Vi'i LeiiiliinliiiU 
Blruii ; MiWHiiKcrlcR Miirlllnie* 
(liuad olUec In I'lirlB), !m Cannou 
Btri.ri; NcUit'iliiiidH India Steam 
NavlKiitlon Vo., 13 Austliili liirs; 
llonjs'koiig nnd ('liina Uati Cum- 
pany, 11 Old Jewry tlminlier», 
J.C. Walduck, Seerotiiry; Singa- 
pore GaB Co., 8 St. Mary Axe, 
Uobcrt Kliiif, Secretary; riicllle 
Saw Millu, ilakodadl, Artnihtcad 
& Co. agents, -il Old Broad btrcet; 
Singapore Patent Slip and Dotik 
Co., PaterBon,Smiou8& Co.iik'Ib, 
21 St. Swltliln'H Lane: Slngupuro 
Johore Steam Saw MlllsCo., Pa- 
tisrsou, Siniuiis &. Co. ngenlB.'Ol 
St. Swlthln's Lane; Amoy Dock 
Co.. John Pook, agont, Llnic-st, 
Square; Hongkong and Wlianipoa 
Dock, Morrison & Co. agents, 
Crown-conrt, Phllpot Lane; N. 
China Insuraticc Co., 25 Cornhlll, 
J. S. Miicklntosli, Secretary; Can- 
ton Insurance Co., MatlicBon & 
Co-agents,;! Lombard st.; Union 
Insurance Co. ol Canton, Dent, 
Palmer & Co. agents, King's Arma 
Yard, Moorgate street ; Hong- 
kong Insurance Co., Gledstanes 
& Co, agcnta, 2fi Austlnfrlara ; 
China Tradera Insurance Co. 



JapaT Marine Insurance Co. Rob 
erl Benson & Co. ag'ts, SO King's 
Arms Yard, Moorgate St.; Ceylon 
Co., Palmereton EulldingB. Old 
Broad st., R. A. Cameron, Sec'y ; 
Borneo Co. 7 Mincing Lane, Wm. 
Marliii, Manager; Tanjong Pagar 
Dock Co. (limited) of Singapore, 
Mactaggart, TWIman & Co, ag'ts, 
34 Great St. Helens. Banks.— 
Agra Bank. 28 Nictiolas Lane, 
Lombard street, J. Thompson. 
Chairman; Chartered Bank ol 
India, Australia, and China, Hat- 
ton Court, Threadncedle street, 
J. H. Gwyther, Manager; Char- 
tered Mercantile Bank of India, 
London, and China, Old Broad 
street, D. T, Robertson. General 
Manager; Comptoir d'Escompte 
de Paris. 144 Leadenhall street, 
Deutsche Bank, "Aetlen Geseil- 
schaft" of Berlin, agencies, Na- 
tional Provincial Bank of En- 
gland, U2 Bishopsgate street. 
Within; German Bank of London, 
Bartholomew Lane, Lothbnry ; 
Bank of Rotterdam, Union Bank 
of London, agents. Princess st.; 
Hongkong andSbanghai Banking 
Corporation. W. H. Vacher, Man- 
ager, 32 Lombard street; Nation- 
al Bank of India, R. 0. Sawers, 
Chief Manager, SO King William 
street; Oriental Bank Corpora- 
tion, Threadnecdle street, C J.F. 
Stuart. Chief Manager. 



LOCATION COONTlt AMD 
CITY PUBLIC Of f ICES 

Police Court— City HallBuIld'B. 

Justices- S04 Montgomery St. 

County— City Hall. 

Probate- City Hall. 

Third District— Mechanics In- 
stitute Building. 

Fourth District— City Hall. 

Twelfth District— City Hall. 

Fifteenth District - 8 Mont- 
gomery Avenue. 

Nineteenth District— Dexter s 
Building, Kearny near Cal. 

District Attorney — 8 Mont- 
gomery Avenue. 

City and Co. Att'y— City Hall. 

Police Attorney— City Hall, 

Grand Jury liooMS— City Hall. 

Sheriff— City Hall. 

Public Admi n i 8trator-C3G CI ay 

City PnYsiciAN-;>14 Kearny st. 

Coroner— [i.S(i Clay street. 

Custom House— Battery street. 

Collector op Internal Revh- 
NUE— Old Merchants' Kxch'nge. 

Assessor Internal Revenue- 
Hayward'B Building. 

Post Office — 'Washington and 
Battery streets. 

Corporation Yard— Socramento 
street, near Drumm. 

Mayor— Citv Hall. 

Board op Supervisors- City H. 

Clerk Supervisors— City Hall. 

Hospital— Potrero Av, between 
2-id and 2."d street. 

Market Inspector- 124 Geary. 

Park Commissioners— 302 Mont- 
gomery street. 

Tax Collector— City Hall. 

SuPT. of Streets— City Hall. 

A8SESS0R--City Hall. 

County Clerk— City Hall. 

FIRE Alarm and Police Telb- 
GRAPH— Brenhsm Place. 

Board of Education— City Hall. 

Supt. Pub. Schools- City Hall. 

Station House— City Hatl. 

Auditor— Room 3, City Hall. 

Treasurep.- Boom 3. City Hall. 

Hall of P.ecords— Washington 
and Kearny streets. 

Fire Department— 23 Kearny 

License Collector— City Hall. 

Industrial SonooL-City Hall. 

Surveyor— 6211 Washington st 

Health Office— 1"J Geary st. 

Chief of Police- City Hall. 

Pound Feephk— Pine street, bet 
Pierce k.kI Steincr. 

Quarantine— 124 Geary street. 

Habb Master— Dsvls &, Valleiu. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



July 27, 1878. 



ART JOTTINGS. 

Aside from the near-at-hand exhibitioa at the Pavilion, there 
seems but little stiirinj^ iu art circles. At Morris. Schwab & Go's they 
Iiave just put on view a new picture by Mr. H. J. Johnstone — a rocky 
mount:iin gorge, through which is seen tumbling a midsummer torrent. 
For careful and miniature-like finish this last work is the equal of any- 
thing the artist has heretofore given na. It is doubtless, too, a portrait 
of the spot; in fact, it appears painfully literal, even in color it is heavy 
and leaden, giving it more the character of a retouched photograph than 
anything sketched from nature without the aid of a camera. In happy 
contrast to this picture is a work near at hand, by Welch, now in 
Munich; a Spring landscape, as crisp and artistic as can well be imagined. 
In this little picture we see art which does not in the least partake of 
mechanism. In this gallery is Narjot's **Ecin," a comely lass sitting by 
a lake, with a pet dog for companion. It is, perhaps, a little crude and 
raw in color, but the drawing is excellent, and taken altogether it is the 
best work Mr. Narjot has yet exhibited. 

Mr. H. J. Brand exhibits in Snow & May's window a plaster bust of 
the late W. S. O'Brien. It is evident the modeler could never have seen 
the deceased millionaire, or he would be able, with ordinary skill, to pro- 
duce a work not so entirely unlike the man as this is. 

Mr. Cogswell, a portrait painter, who some years ago produced the por- 
traits of the ex-Governors of the State wliich hang in the Capitol, has re- 
turned to the city and set up a studio in the Grand Hotel, and has there 
on exhibition a couple of portraits of our esteemed friends. Colonel Peter 
Donahue and wife; they are a little more than half life size, and as speci- 
mens of painting are worse than any of the ex-Governors' above referred 
to, and they are bad enough. As likenesses, they will pass, and so will 
most Chinese portraits; but such drawing, posing, modeling and flesh 
color can only be seen upon, or from the easel of the professional portrait 
manufacturer, to which guild Mr. Cogswell evidently belongs. The fol- 
lowing communication will provoke a smile from all the artists and others 
conversant with the inner workings of the institution referred to. Ladies 
are too apt to take a superficial view only of passing events, and we fear 
our friend is no exception to the rule. 

Editor of News Letter : Dear Sir : I think your usually unbiased 
art critic does great injustice to two members of the Art Association, 
Messrs. Ford H. Rogers and Silas Sellcck, in not giving to them the credit 
of doing more for the Association than any other two members. The 
present condition of this institution is more owing to the zeal of these 
gentlemen and their friends than to any one else, the President not ex- 
cepted. A Lady Member. 

Yes ! we have a bias in this matter— an honest one, too — born of obser- 
vation and experience ! Reputable members of the Art Association will 
not soon forget the sad spectacle presented at the galleries on the occasion 
of the annual election, a year ago last March, when the two trentlemen 
named by our correspondent were particularly zealous in conducting the 
canvas, in favor of a President who had not been nominated by the com- 
mittee chosen for that duty, and who, it was bciastingly stated, was fur- 
nishing the money to employ carriages with which to bring to the polls 
the friends of these zealots. There is no doubt that, as the lady member 
says, the present condition of the Association is owing to the manage- 
ment of these zealous membei-s and their friends. Under their manage- 
ment the large sura paid in fur life-memberships, which should have been 
held sacred for a building fund, was used up in current expenses, and 
■when the present management took charge the Association was consider- 
ably in debt. 

In relation to the qualifications fitting gentlemen for places of trust in 
such institutions, it is a good plan to estimate tlieir ability by the way 
they conduct their own business. If a man does not well by himself and 
his own affairs, it cannot be expected that be wall be a brilliant success 
in the conduct of other people's. 

Here we have a couple of letters from people who evidently take oppo- 
site views of the same subject. We are not yet prepared ti» discuss the. 
extraordina-y occurrence referred to. Having not yet beard from Paiis 
regarding the matter, we will defer further comment till we do. 
Not JVatnralized. 

Mr. News Letter: You and your readers have not forgotten the little 
controversy had two years ago on the two " Elaines," which bordered on 
acrimony on the part of him who, before he got through, wished a x>lague 
on both their pictures. It now appeai-s that Mr. Tojctti's Elaine was not 
accepted at the Paris Exposition because, forsooth, so say his friends, "he 
is not naturalized." For the first time do we learn in the history of arts 
and sciences, that a man must bring with his handiwork a ceitihcate that 
he is a citizen of a certain political division. It has been held from time 
immemorial that an artist worthy of the name requires no letter of intro- 
duction, nor a certificate of his baptismal, much less a citizi^n's paper. 
While not wishing to detract from the merits of Tojetti's EUuiie, I desire 
to remind you and your readers of ttie fact that I offered to send the pic- 
ture to Europe at my expense, and if it should find more favor in the 
eyes of the Old World critics than Toby's Elaine, then I would hang up 
the pallet and my pen, Rosenthal is considerably ahead, and his friends 
have reason to rejoice. N. 

Mons. Bditro: By the within card you will readily see that your comments upon 
the rejection of Mr. Tojctti's paintings at Paris were unjust if not lualieioun, and 
hope you will make some small reference to the matter in simple justice to the 
artist. Italiaso. 

The card " Italiano" referred to is that which appeared in the Ckronich 
on Sunday, conveying the startling intellig-ence, from Mr. Commissionaire 
Legay, that Tojetti, being an alien, could not be allowed within the 
sacred yjrecincts of the American exhibit at the Paris Universal Exposi- 
tion. We disclaim any intention of being either unjust or malicious, but 
when the time comes will not hesitate to give the facts as understood in 
Paris with regard to the non-admission of the two paintings. 



THE ' 'AUTOMATIC." 

What makes the seamstress' toil but play. 

As silently, without delay, 
It shni-es eacli tuck to fold away? "AUTOMATIC." 
What sews with speed, ami runs so light 

O'er silken robes or fiuecy white. 
And leaves no aching bones at night? "AUTOMATIC." 
Office of "Automatic" Machine, 124 Post street. 



NOTICE. 

Presidents, Secretaries and Managing Directors of Mining 
Companies. 

Please prepare yoar reports for die " Pacific Const Aunn»l 
Miiiini? Review and Stock Led_,'er,'" the neecssiiry Blanks for which hiive beeu 
left at the diflferent Miiiini,'- Olfices. 

It ia respectfully suggested that the Report should embrace : A brief history of 
the mine and a description of the company's works, machinery, etc. ; a sjiiopsis of 
the Superintendent's annual report ; the Treasurer's exhibit, etc. 

Stockholders and the stock-dealing public geiierafty desire a statement of the 
amount of money received and dlsbuffied, and for what purposes. They also desire 
to know what work hag been done, and what is in prn^freas. Give the people the 
facts in relation to the mines. Kcmerabar that in addition to the immense edition 
that will be printed for home circulation, thousiinda will go into the hands of cap- 
itiilists in the Eastern, Western and Southern States, and thousands into Europe 
and Asia. 

Let every mine on the coast be represented in the Directory department, and let 
every mine jwssessing merit and fair prospects be well written up in the Editorial 
department. 

If there is a Secretary in the city that has not received blanks for his Reports, let 
him send his name at once to R. S. LAWRENCE, Editor, Room 75, Russ House. 
Correspondence. 

Gentlemen in the interior to whom we have addressed Circulars will please send in 
their Reports at the earliest pnieticable moment. Send us all the facts in relation to 
the Dititrict and each particular mine. The influence of the publication will be 
world-wide. 

Tiie work will be published by the old and reliable house of Francis & Valentine, 
5 17 Clay street. July 20. 

1378-79. 

Personal Property Taxes, for City and Conuty Purposes. 

"\rotlce Is hereby ^iveu that a certified copy of the Personnl 

±S Property Assessment Roll of this City and County for the fiscal year lS7ij-7!>, 
ha-s this day been placed in mv hands for collection. Taxes thereon are now due 
and payable. Taxes remaining unpaid after AI'JNDAY, tlic FIFTH DAY OF 
AUGUST ensuing, will then be delinquent, and five per cent, will he added thereto. 
WM. MITCHELL, Tax Collector City and County of S F. 
July S, 1878. July 13. 

r. 0. Snow. SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY, W. B. May. 

SNOW A MAY, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
Pictares, Frames, moiaing-s, and Artists* Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 



THOMAS DAY, 



Importer of every variety of Gas Flxtnre.<«, Crystal, Ctilt, 
Steel and Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
Bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 and 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco. Jan. 27. 



FRANK KENNEDY, 



Law Office, 604 Kfercbaiit Street. —Probate, Divorce, Banh- 
ruptcy, and other cases attended to. Rents, and all other demands, collected. 
Bad tenants ousted. Charge taken of real estate for residents, or absentees. Charges 
very reasonable. Jan. 12. 

A YOUNG LADY 

Of refinement desires a poiition ns Governess or Compan- 
ion. Is competent to teach Eu^'lish, French, Music and Drawiny. Address 
GUVERNKSS, News Letter Office June 8. 

Geo. T Knox. 

Notaries Pablicand Commissioners of DeeJs, No. 31ti dloni- 
gomcry street. Luans made on approved Seeuritiea. Real Estate bun;,')it and 
sold. Collections made. June 8, 



E. H. Tharp, 



THARP & KNOX. 



CASTLE BROTHERS, 

ESTABLlSHJaD IN THE YEAR 1850. 

[Diporters of Teas and East liiilia Ooofis, Nos. :il3 aud 315 
Front street. San Fninciseo. Jan. 13. 



S' 



TABER, MARKER & CO., 



DCcessors to Phillips, Taber «!t Co., Importers and Wholesale Gro- 
cers, lOS and 110 Califunna street, beluw Frunt, San Francisco. April 15. 



R. H. LLOYD, 

Attorney-at-Xta-nr, Room 13. Xevada Block. 



BIttJCE, 



B3' PBIBTTS "Sa 
537 SACBAMENTO STREET, 

BELOW MONTGOMERY. 



^1 6>AA's»'»»'y 

^P jL/^\9\J Staple Goods to dealers. 



tiept. l.J 



Permanent salesmen wanted to sell 

No peddling. Expenses paid. Address 
GRANT &. CO., 2,4, G and S Home St., Cincinnati, O. 



^.-iOOl-f Parliuula 



Ag-ents ivauteil. Dnsiiiess leg:ltimate. 

Lulars free. Address J. WORTH & CO. , St. Luuis, Mo. 



S3 



Gold Plateil Watches. 

Sample Wulch Free l^i Agents. 



Cheapest in the knon-n world. 

Address A. COULTER & CO., Chicaao. 



F 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 



Inestanft Cheapest Meat'flavoriug 

Dishes and Sauces. 



StocK for Sonps, 9Iade 

March 2. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MFAT 



[s a success and boon for which Nations should feel {srrate- 
ful. See " Medical Press," " Lancet," " British Medical Journal," etc. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 
^^aution—Genulue only with fac-slinile of Baron lilebi^'s 

\_j Sitfuature. iu blue ink, across LabeL "Consumption in England increased ten- 
fold in ten years." March 2. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT. 

To he hail of all Sitore-keepers, Grocers anil Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale only), C. David & Co., -^A, Mark Lane, 
London, England. March *2. 

offices" of the aeroplane NAVIGATION CO.. 

Jan. 4. No. 607 tu (il.5 Merehant street, Sau Francisco. 



July 27, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



"The World." the Flesh, and the Devil. 

t By * Tmtlifal Ponman. 1 

Genfiral Grant has arrived at Berliu, and iti at the Hotel Kaiserhof, 
when) I^rd Beaoonsfield has been 8ta>'inf;. General Grant will not, it is 
understood, make a Ions stay in the Uermau capital, but will continue his 
journey, after a brief break, to Copenhagen, where his brother-in-law is 
accredited as United States Minister. ^^Mrs. Dixon, an inhabitant of 
Silsden, Yorkshire, England, has just died of excessive joy at the unex- 
pected return of her son from America, where he had been for nine years. 
■^— Comiiti; i-'iTH/* says; Mr. Gladstone apparently viewed the poetry of 
Homer very much as a Russian prince was suid to have regarded dancmp. 
There was a ball at which it was noted that the prince joined in every 
dance, and that in most of the dances he had a certain beautiful girl for 
his partner. " You seem to be very fond of daneinff," said one of his 
Friends, by way of rallying him. " 1 detest it," he replied. '* It w^as that 
lovely girl, then '' suggested the friend. "She is nothing," was the re- 
joinder. '* Well, if you hate dancing and don't care for the girl, why do 
you dance ?" Thus compelled to gratify the pertinacious curiosity of his 
interrogator, the prince explained: " I dance to perspire." Even as the 

Brince, it was ur^ed, waltzed most vigorously without caring for the dance. 
Ir. Gladstone studied Homer enthusiastically, irrespective of his poetry. 
-An amusing story is told of a Paris photographer. On the occasion 
of the accession of Leo SIII. to the Pontifical throne, he had prepared 
millions of portraits of his Holiness, a large stock of which remained un- 
sold. He was on the verge of ruin, and he saw before him only a few 
days of grace, when suddenly the coming celebration of the Voltaire cen- 
tenary- suggested to him a splendid idea. Having remarked that there 
was a kind of likeness between the features of the new Pope and those of 
the patriarch of Femey, he contrived, with the addition of a night cap 
and the transformation of the pontifical robes into a nightgown, to make 
a presentable philosopher out of a pope ; and he found his attempt so 
successful, that he extended the correction to the whole stock. By the 
following week he had disposed of it, and the firm is now one of the most 
prosperous on the Paris market.— From the sprightly Table-Talk of 
"Syivanus Urbani," in the pages of the Gentleman, we detach a fragment: 
A certain light of British Science, who shall be nameless, was called upon 
the other day by an influential admirer from Kentucky. "Sir," he said, 
" we admire your writings, and have shown it. We had no academic 
distinction to confer upon you, having no University ; but we have done 
our best. We are a racing people, and we have named our best stallion 
after you! " This is not unlike the polite attention of the Far West Folk, 
who^ by way of signifying their pleasure at the arrival among them of a 
minister of the Gospel, instituted a race-meeting for his gratification.^— 
I beg to draw attention to Zechariah vii,, 23, in which, methinks I see a 
prophecy of the Berlin Congress. The words of the text are the.ie: " In 
those days, it shall come to pass that ten men shall take hold of all lan- 
guages of the nations, even shall take hold of the skirt of him that is a 
Hebrew, saying, we will go with you." — T. T., in rru(A.^— Between the 
18th and 27th of June, 10,547 foreign tourists have arrived in Paris, and 
have been duly registered at the various hotels, according to the police 
regulations. Out of that number 3,200 were Englishmen, 1,503 Belgians, 
1,777 Germans, 802 Americam!, 731 Italians, 631 Swiss, 476 Austrians, 385 
Spaniards, 334 Dutch, 126 Luxemburgers, 83 Danes, 82 Portuguese, 75 
Brazilians, 67 Poles, 56 Algerians, 52 Turks, 37 Greeks, 36 Roumanians, 
35 Canadians, 31 French Colonists, 27 Indians, 27 Egyptians, 17 Mexi- 
cans, 15 Japanese, 14 Chilians, 14 Persians, 12 Venezuelians, 11 Peru- 
vians, 6 Columbians, 6 Costa Ricans, 4 Chinese, 4 Oceanians, 3 Equatori- 
ans, 3 Merocans, 2 Bolivians, 2 Guatemalese, 2 Paraguayse, 2 Tunisians, 
and 141 nondescripts.-^— The first volumes of the new Edition de luxe of 
Thackeray, an imperial 8vo, are to be published in London on the first of 
next October. The edition will be limited to 1,000 copies.— —Captain 
Richard Burton ia to translate the "Arabian Nights" anew.— —General 
Grant is looking much, better for his tour. He has lost 30 pounds of flesh, 
and the loss ie becoming to him. Mrs. Grant now weighs six pounds more 
than he, the respective figm-es being 168 pounds and 174.— At Lady 
Waldegrave's masked ball, the ladies are to be masked, and the gentlemen 
to appear in unveiled ugliness. Our experience of masked balls is, that 
they are always failures. In Italy, ladies frequent them, and they fancy 
that when they have said "lo ti connosco " they have given great evi- 
dence of wit. Clever women almost invariably break down when they 
try to be clever incog. If a woman talks to any one that she knows well, 
it is a thousand to one that he will discover within five minutes who she 
is, although he may be civil enough to pretend to be ignorant of it. For 
*' spooning," these balls have their advantage, but then there must be a 
previous arrangement between spooner and spoonee. As a rule, the gen- 
tleman who goes under the impression that many fair ones will seize upon 
the opportunity of being masked to declare to him bow long and secretly 
they nave loved him, is doomed to disappointment.^^ When Mr. Hay- 
ward presented one of the reigning beauties with a sonnet in which her 
charms were celebrated, she complained that the verses were very kind, 
but not "warm enough." — rru(/i. — ^Here is another tale of a reigning 
beauty. She received, as Mrs. Gamp says, "unbeknown," a string of 
pearls. Her husband went off to the eminent jeweler whose name was on 
the casket that contained them, to inquire about them. "Are they real?" 
he asked. "Yes," replied the jeweler. The worthy spouse was telling 
the story to a friend of his a few days later, and, somewhat to the sur- 
prise of the friend, added, "so, of course, my wife wears them."^^To 
choose a wife by the music she plays and the way she plays it is suggested 
by a very practical man. He says if she manifests a predilection for 
Strauss, sheis frivolous; for Beethoven, she is unpractical; for Liszt, she 
is too ambitious; for Verdi, she is sentimental; for Offenback, she ia 
giddy; for Gounod, she is lackadaisical; f or Gottschalk, she is superficial; 
for Mozart, she is prudish ; for Flotow, she is commonplace ; for Wagner, 
she is idiotic. The girl who hammers away at " The Maiden's Prayer," 
*' The Anvil Chorus," and " Silvery Waves " may be depended upon as a 
good cook and also as being healthful ; and, if she includes the "Battle of 
Prague " and " Home, Sweet Home " in her repertory, you ought to know 
that she has been thoughtfully, religiously and strictly niurtured.-^^A 
writer in the London Lancet, speaking of the effects of cold and warm 
baths, says: "The ultimate result of hot and cold baths, if their temper- 
ature be moderate, is about the same, the . difference being, to use the 
words of Braun, that 'cold refreshes by stimulating the functions, heat 
by physically facilitating them ; and in this lies the important practical 
difference between the cold water and the thermal method of treatment. " 



HIGHEST STOCK QTIOTATIONS FOB W:EEK ENDIKO JITLT 26, 1878. 

COMPILBD BT OROaoB C. HiCKOX & CO., 230 MONTOOMKRT St. 



Namb op MutB. 



Argenta. 

Andes 

Alpha 

'Alta 

•Alps 

Bullion 

•Belcher 

Best &Belchev.. 

Benton ... 

Bodie 

Cons Imperial . . . 
•Crown Point,... 

ChoHar 

California 

Con. Virginia 

Caledonia 

Confdence 

De Frees 

Eureka Con 

E,tchequer 

Gould &, Curry . . 

Gila 

•Grand Prize.... 
Hale&Norcross. 

Julia 

•Justice 

Jackson 

Rentuck 

•Leopard 

Lady Wash'n .... 

Leviathan 

Leeds 

Mex'can 

•"Modoc 

Manhattan 

Northern Belle . . 

*Ophir 

Overman 

Raymond & Ely. 

Rye Patch 

•Savage 

Sierra Nevada . . . 

*SilverHiIl 

Beg Belcher 

Solid Silver 

♦Succor 

Silver King, Ar'a 
Silv. King South. 

•Tip-Top 

Union Con 

♦Utah 

Yellow Jacket.. . 



Sat. Uondat. 



TinsDAT. Wbdxesdt TuuimD'Y. Friday. 

A.M. r U. p. K. A.M. A.U. | P.M. A.M. 



10§ 



15J 



n 11 7i 

lOi -, 10, 

io| ^ lOi I loi ' — 



15i 



7i 71 
10 — 
10 10 9i 



•i! 



lOj 



vt\ 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus ■* 

MARINE INTELLIGENCE. 



ARRIVALS AND CLEARANCES AT THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO, FOR 
THE WEEK ENDING JULY 26, 1878. 



DATE. 


VfiSSBL. 


MASTER. 


WHERE FROM, 


, BT WHOM CLEARED. 


J'ly 21 

.. 21 

21 




Jaeger 

Mattson 

Nisseu 

Berry 

Howland.... 

Reed 

Penhallow.. 

Morse 

Kruse 

Harding 

Delany 

Martensen.. 
Johnson .... 


Manila 

Seattle 

Tahiti 

Hongkong — 
New York.... 
Liverpool — 

Seattle 

Victoria 

Bombay 

Port Blakely . 

Seattle 

Departure Bay 
Manila 


Wm. T. Coleman & Co. 


Bark Harvest Home . . 


S. C. & T. Co. 
J. Pinet. 


22 




Williams, Blanchard & Co. 


.. 22 
.. 22 
.. 22 
.. 23 
.. 23 
23 


Ship Red Cross 

Ship British Army 

Bark Enoch Talbot 

St'r Dakota 

Bark Joseph Haydn. . . 


George Howes & Co. 
Rodgera, Meyer & Co. 
S. C. & T. Co. 
Williams, Blanchard & Co. 
Rodgers, Meyer & Co. 
Renton, Holmes & Co. 


.. 23 
.. 23 
.. 25 


Ship War Hawk 

Bark John Irgens 

Ship Portia 


S. C. & T. Co. 

H. B. Berryman & Co. 

Falkner, Bell & Co. 



CIiEABAIfCES. 



DATE. 


VESSEL. 


MASTER. 


WHERE BOUND. 


CONSIONEES. 


JTy22 


Ship British Com'dore 


Pm-dy 

Leach 

Johnston... 

Dunton 

Swan 

Jordan 

Frost 


Queenstown . . 
Queenstown . . 

San Diego 

Burrard Inlet. 

Nanaimo 

Victoria, etc.. 
Honolulu 


Dresbach & Co. 






Goodall, Perkins & Co. 


.. 23 


Bark W. A. Holcomb.. 
Bark Whister 


Dickson, De Wolf & Co. 


.. 23 
.. 24 


BarkMarmion 

BarkD. C. Murray. .. 


C. H. Wells. 

J. C. Merrill & Co. 




ENGLISH BICYCIiES. 

G. L. CUNNINGHAM, 
206 Sansome street, San Francisco, 

Is now prepared to fill orders for Duplex Ex- 
celsior, Stanley, Club, Gentleman's, Challenge, 
Premier, and all other makes of English Bicycles. 

Price, from 860 to »160, 
according to quality of material and size of 
machine. G. L. CUNNINGHAM. 

Importer of English Bicycles, 
206 Sansome St., office of Macondray & Co., 
June 22. San Francisco, California. 



FOR NEW YORK, 

DispatolL Line, froia Vallejo-street "Wharf. 

The new Al Clipper Ship *'M. P. Oracc," B. P. IVUbor, 
Commander.— This splendid ship goes into berth with large engagements, and 
will receive Quick Dispatch. For balance of freight early application will be neces- 
sary. GEORGE HOWES & CO., 302 California street. 
■■ Consignees in New York : Messrs. Suiton & Co. July 27. 



20 



SAK FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 27, 1878, 



TTNDELrVERBD UErTTERS. 

No. 5. 

"And thus I clothe my naked villaipy 
With old odd cnda stol'n forth of holy writ: 
And seem a saint when most I play the devil." 

"Divinity of Hell! 
When devils will the blackest sins put on, 
They do suggest at first with heavenly shows," 

Shaeespeabe. 
"A daw's not reckoned a religious bird 
Because it keeps a cawing- from the steeple." 
Hood. 

The Rev. Henry "Ward Beecher— Sir: Hearm|: that you are about 
to visit this city in the course of a lecturing tour, I venture to protest 
against the infliction of your presence. Not because I imagine for a mo- 
ment that an humble individual like myself can in any degree influence 
the movements of a great ecclesiastical potentate of your caliber, but be- 
cause, knowing that many think as I do, I wish you to be informed that 
there ave people who are neither dazzled by the brilliance of your achieve- 
ments, cheated by the hollowness of your pretensions, nor attracted by 
the putridity of your reputation. You would, indeed, be foolish in the 
extreme to allow yourself to be dissuaded from your projected visit, be- 
cause, beyond a doubt, you will make money by the speculation. I|can 
predict this with certainty, because I well know what a vast multitude 
will attend your lectures. The gentlemen of your cloth, and you, sir, in 
particular, are seldom indifferent to the pecuniary result of their under- 
takings — probably by reason of their anxiety to obey the scriptural in- 
junction and lay up treasure where moth and rust will not depreciate its 
value— id est, in three-per-cents, or model farms. When, therefore, I 
predict for you a fat harvest of shekels on the Pacific coast, you will 
doubtless regard me as a pleasant sort of prophet; but when one seer address- 
es another, it is etiquette for the former to give some practical proof of his 
seership. I will, therefore, proceed to tell you something which I know 
you have hitherto regarded as an unwbispered mystery. I shall tell you, 
sir, the motives wieh impel yoxu* vast audiencies to drop their coin into 
your capacious gaberlunzie bag — motives which you are right in believ- 
ing that your patrons are generally ashamed to communicate to each 
other. Do they go to hear the great lecturer? Yes, some of them. 
I honestly believe that one out of every thousand of your hearers ac- 
tually does go to listen to one of the most impassioned orators that 
the world has ever produced. But the rest — the nine hundred and 
ninety-nine — what do they go for? They go to see the man, and 
not to hear the speaker. They regard you, sir — these nine hundred and 
ninety-nine — as the most illustrious example of clerical incontinence ex- 
tant, as the great Friar John of the nineteenth century, as the incarna- 
tion, embodiment, and Godhead of a species of modern Phallic cult; as 
a high-priest of the Lampsacene let loose in the name of the Most 
High — and as such, they pay their price to have a good long look at you. 
From the moment you first appear on the platform until you have made 
your last bow, the eyes of maids and matrons, of young rakes and old 
satjT^, are riveted upon you, not with admiration at the eloquence which 
flows like the golden stream of Pactolus from your sensual lips, but with 
the gloating satisfaction which "decent" society experiences when it is 
accorded an apportunity to gaze upon something nasty without losing 
caste. You know that this is the case as well as I do. How could it be 
otherwise? Your name has for years been bandied about from mouth to 
mouth as that of an adulterer of the first water. All the disgusting de- 
tails of the scandal, in which you were the principal figure, have become 
national property, and the nation has rolled the carrion, thus acquired, 
under its tongue as though it were spices and honey. You may be inno- 
cent of the foul crime laid at your door— I do not sit in judgment upon 
you — but it certainly is not the part of a clergyman or a gentleman to 
trade upon such a vile notoriety, by renting himself out to some specula- 
tor to be exhibited, like a fat woman or six-legged calf, at so much a 
head. 

For, sir, though yourgifts were ten times as great as they are, they would 
avail nothing to prevent you from being regarded by the vast majority of 
the people of this country as a social monstrosity. I repeat that whether 
this is your fault or your misfortune, I neither know nor care to dis- 
cover. Whatever the cause, the effect remains the same, and it surely be- 
hooves you in any case not to make an unnecessary and indecent exposure 
of the features which even the public prints have not failed to reproduce 
whenever they wished to put an extra touch of humor to their ribaldry. 
It is nonsense to say that the innocent man need not be ashamed. If 
more than half the world firmly believes him to be guilty he has good 
cause to be ashamed until his innocence is established. Many illustrious 
examples have proved that this is the true code by preferring even death 
to a life tainted by suspicion, while there have been instances innumerable 
of slandered men and women whom all the world knew to be blameless 
relinquishing their pmrsuits and going into volimtary exile because the 
proof of their guiltlessness was wanting. 

*' But you, sir, like your arch-adversary, Tilton, have not even been 
content to ignore public opinion and pursue the customary tenor of your 
way. You have determined to coin your dishonor into gold, and are en- 
deavoring to make a sound purse compensate for a rotten reputation. 
And you will doubtless succeed. You will be stared at and not admired, 
listened to and not heard, marveled at and not reverenced; but neverthe- 
less the gold will filter into your pocket through that of the showman 
who has hired you. What a delightful purpose for ' ' America's leading 
divine" to serve. A traveling lusus naturce. Pay your dollars, ladies and 
gentlemen, and walk in and take a look at the "true inwardness" of 
things ! Mr. Beecher is about to perform on the "ragged edge !" You 
have all heard of this wonderful animal, ladies and gentlemen, now you 
see him ! Never mind the creature's chattering. We have to let him keep 
that up for the sake of appearances, but now's your chance to see the 
hero of the great American scandal ! Visitors are advised to whet their 
appetite for the exhibition by reading up the details of the great Beecher 
trial as they appeared in the newspapers. Walk up ! Walk up, and see 
the live parson who for years has kept the country divided over the ques- 
tion, " Did he do it ?" Walk up ! Walk up ! 

I have ventured, sir, to anticipate your showman, but you are welcome 
to place upon your *' posters" and placards any of the above alluring sen- 
tences that you may see fit. In the meantime permit me to subscribe my- 
self, your somewhat disgusted servant, . 

A nn ual flowering plants resemble whales, as they come up to blow. 



TESTIMONIAL TO LORD BEACONSFIELD. 

On Monday evening a number of the British residents of this city 
met at Mr. Gray's music store on Kearny street, for the purpose of decide 
ing upon the form of testimonial to he presented to the Earl of Beacons- 
field. Mr. W. G. Harrison addressed those present, and in an eloquent 
manner eulogized the British Premier for the determined attitude adopted 
by him at the Congress, and for the glorious success achieved by nira, 
which has resulted in placing England in the high position she now occu- 

Eies in the world, a position analagous to that which she held after the 
attle of Waterloo. A victory, gained by intellect, firmness, and cour- 
age, and which, without drawing the sword, brings peace, happiness and 
prosperity to millions, and bears a striking contrast to that of Russia over 
Turkey, which destroyed hundreds of thousands of lives and left in its 
wake nothing but desolation and woe. Mr. Harrison then stated the ob- 
ject of the meeting, namely, to select a design for the testimonial. Two 
were shown. One was by A. W. Stott, from Anderson & Randolph ; the 
other was by Colonel Andrews of the Diamond Palace. The former rep- 
resented a gold casket, on the top of wh-ich, in alto-rilievo, appears the 
Beaconsfield coat of arms in gold ; on either side are circles, each divided 
into eight compartments; these will contain specimens of Californian ores; 
on the front of the casket is the British coat of arms, surrounded by the 
rose, shamrock and thistle ; on the reverse side is to be the arms of Cali- 
fornia ; at each end of the casket are figures in alto-rilievo, one showing a 
Sikh and British soldier grasping hands, beneath which is the motto, "De- 
fence, not Defiance," and the other a Gourka rifleman and a British 
sailor in similar attitude, with the motto " Beady, aye, Ready ;" the un- 
occupied parts of the casket will be handsomely inlaid with polished gold 
quartz of different colors in mosaic ; around the edges of the top and bot- 
tom will be an endless cable, indicative of England's nautical supremacy; 
the whole will rest upon four lion's heads. 

Inside the casket will be placed a suitable address, written on a sheet 
of vellum, at the foot of which will be photographed the signatures of 
the subscribers. The design submitted by Colonel Andrews represented 
a safe made of silver, with gold bands, the top inlaid with polished gold 
quartz ; the interior of the outer door was divided into compartments 
containing specimens of all the ores of the State ; the inner door of the 
safe of plain gold, upon which an inscription might be engraved ; the 
whole resting upon silver runners. After some discussion, it was decided 
to accept the design shown by Anderson & Randolph, and that Messrs. 
Barton Hill, Melville, Gray, Woods, Parsons, Wilson, Yates, Calling- 
ham, Creighton, and Sherwood be added to the present committee for the 
5urpose of seeing that the details of the design were fully carried out. 
'he time required to manufacture the casket will be about six weeks, and 
it is expected that many new names will be added to the list of subscrib- 
ers during that period. In the course of the evening, several British 
songs were sung, concluding with " God Save the Queen," the last verse 
of which was as follows : 

" Far from our Fatherland, 

Britons unconquered stand 
For England's Queen ! 

In town or forest free, 

Britons unconquered we 

Shout, with true loyalty, 

God save our Queen ! " 
A poem written by a lady for the occasion was read with enthusiastic 
effect by Barton Hill. We shall endeavor to insert it in our nex issue. 

SAW FRANCISCANS IN THE SANDTWICH ISLANDS 

The Reciprocity Treaty with the Hawaiian Islands is proving for 
our merchants a strong incentive for large ventures in the realms of King 
Kalikaua. Chief and latest of these is Claus Spreckles' scheme for es- 
tablishing extensive sugar plantations on some of the large tracts of land 
which the Islanders have thus far allowed to remain unproductive, owing 
to a lack of the capital necessary for bringing them under cultivation. 
•In furtherance of his project Mr. Spreckles has just made a visit to the 
Islands in company with a well known engineer of this city, with whom 
he examined the field for his new enterprise. He has returned the owner 
of some 20,000 acres of high plain land on the Island of Maui, and about 
1,500 acres near Hilo, Hawaii. He has also leased large tracts in various 
other parts of the kingdom. His purchase, to become profitable, will re- 
quire a large outlay of capital. A complete system of irrigation is neces- 
sary to make the land productive, and means must be had to transport 
the crops to the nearest ports. The seaboards of both Maui and Hawaii 
have few harbors, and the difficulty in bringing to them the products of 
remote plantations has been hitherto the great obstacle to utilizing the 
table lands of the interior. To surmount this difficulty there is a project 
on foot for the construction of railways around these islands. Mr. Spreck- 
les has been an active advocate of the plan during his late trip there, but 
its fulfillment is as yet in the dim futm-e, and will depend on the co-oper- 
ation of the planters. The advantages to those interested of this or any 
other scheme looking to the development of the sugar interest of the 
Islands, are apparent. Their planters at present send to the Pacific 
coast, free of duty, about one-third of the sugar consumed on this side of 
the Rocky Mountains. Their commodity, even since the treaty went 
into effect, has commanded as high, or even a higher price, than the same 
product imported from other sugar-producing countries. Were all the 
available lands of the Islands brought under cultivation, they could send 
us more than double the present amount now exported. The profits of 
the new enterprise grow out of the narrowness of the field, which is too 
limited to admit of our markets becoming glutted with the free import. 
So long as the Pacific States have to depend, even for a small portion of 
their sugar supply, on other sources than the Islands, the product of the 
latter will control the market prices. Mr. Spreckles' scheme is simply 
an effort to turn to account this peculiar condition in the sugar trade aris- 
ing from the Reciprocity Treaty, by employing San Francisco capital to 
secure a substantial share of the profits of the new field. 

Friedlander.— The New York Shipping List, under the caption " Cali- 
fornia's Loss," says of the late Isaac Friedlander: " He was a speculator, 
in some sense, and if the country were blessed with more of the same sort 
it would be better off. His speculations did not take the form of betting 
as to the price of cereals months before it was sown, which has of late 
come to be so fashionable, but tended to stimulate production and trans- 
portation, and to this man the great prominence of California as a grain- 
producing State is largely due. Not California alone, but the whole world 
has cause to regret the loss of such a man." 



The Special Organ of " Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Co.""Fred. Marriott, Patentee. 



Prio p«r CopT. 10 Cea««.l 



ESTABLISHED JULT, 80, 1856. 



[Annual Subaoriptlan, (S, 



•*^* ^^^cise^i 




DEVOTED TO THE LEASING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST.' 



Vol. 29. 



SAN FEANOISOO, SATURDAY, AUG. 3, 1878. 



No, 3. 



>aiee of tlae San Fraacisco Iffews I^etter, Alercbaat Street, 

Nog. GOT to 615, San FYancisco. 

GOLD BARS— 890@91o— Silver Bars— 6@16 W cent. disc. Treasury 
Notea are selling at par. Bu>-ing, 99|. Mexican Dollars, 7@7i per 
>er cent, nominal. Trade Dollars, 2^(S3 per cent, discount. 

Exchange on New York, ^ per cent, for Gold ; Currency, 100. On 
London, Bankers, -tOid. ; Coimnercial, 49^d. @ 49§d. Paris, sight, 
6 francs per dollar. Telegrams, 6-10@§ per cent. 

Latest 



" Latest price of Gold at New York, Aui 
price of Sterling, 483(^486^^ ^ 



2d, at 3 P.M., lOOi. 



Kt" Price of Money here, 
open market, l@li. 



@1 per cent, per month- 
;)emand active. 



-bank rate. In the 



PRICES OF LE&DINQ STOCKS AND GOVEBNUEKT BONDS. 

San Francisco Aug. 2, 1878. 



Stocks and Bonds. 
J. 8. Bonds, 5-203 1867-68. 

>gal Tender Notes 

i. F. City Jt Co. B'da, 6a, '58 

i. F. City Bonds, 73 

Jacramento City Bonds — 

fuba County Bonds, Ss 

San Mateo Co. Bonds, 73. . . 

. F. Gas Light Co 

!Jatioual G. B*k & Trust Co, 
ipring Valley Water Co. . . 



Bid. 


Aekea 


106 


'^ 


m 


101 




107 





28 


30 


100 





102 


104 


94 


94i 


75 


80 


94 


94J 


3RECKI! 


'RIDOE Si 



Stocks and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co. 
Front St.,M. & O. R. R. Co. 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad 



Bid. 

20 
63 



110 
115 



Breckinridge Sl Yost, Brokers, 304 Montgomery street. 



THE STOCK MARKET. 

The past week has witnessed a recurrence of those halcyon times 
ffhen stocks were stocks, and chronic " bears" were converted into en- 
Jiusiastic and most rampant bulls. From the commencement of the 
week to the close the market baa been buoyant and full of excitement, 
mdsome stocks show a very material advance. Sierra Nevada has taken 
;he place of Ophir, and is now the key-note to the market, the latter stock 
tiavinp quietly subsided, now that the result of the 2,000-foot level is deter- 
mined. Preparations are being made to continue the sinking of the winze 
to the 2,100-foot level, and the prospecting of that level will undoubtedly 
witness a repetition of those lively fluctuations that have characterized 
this stock for the past three weeks. Though experts are divided in their 
jstimates regarding the prospects of the next level, it is reasonably certain 
:hat most encouraging results may be expected, and our most reliable 
mining men have unbounded faith in the success of the next level. The 
iemand for Sierra Nevada is baaed upon a material improvement in the 
mine, and this fact has brought about a contest for control, the stock 
being pretty evenly divided between certain factions in the market. 
A;t the close the stock showed a slight falling off, induced by 
;he realizing of holders, who were content to pocket the handsome 
profit on their investments. Union closely followed the fluctuations of 
Sierra Nevada, and sympathized proportionately in the decline. Under 
the reported settlement of the compromise with Justice, Alta was in de- 
mand at improved prices, but a lack of official confirmation of the fact, 
;he stock subsequently declined to its former figures. That a settlement 
Df some kind has been effected is undoubtedly true, and we feel certain 
that a speedy adjustment of previous difficulties is near at hand. With 
the improved condition of affairs at the Alta mine, and removal of all 
legal complications, we look for -a considerable advance in this stock im- 
mediately. Eodie continues to attract considerable attention, and if half 
the accounts are true of the wonderful richness of this mine, the stock 
must advance to much higher figures. Other outside stocks are without 
particular change. At the close a general shading off from high prices 
was noticeable, though the market showed a healthy demand throughout. 



GASSAWAY VS. STAPLES. 
I In the matter of the assault made upon Mr. Gassaway last week by 
pVIr. Staples, the particulars of which have, with more or less accuracy, 
[already appeared in the papers, we have simply to state that the trouble 
;ha3 no connection whatever ^rith the N'eics Letter. Mr. Staples' name has 
appeared in this paper, but he himself distinctly asserts that his assault 
luu Mr. Gassaway was provoked by quite another cause. The long and 
5hort of it is that Mr. Staples suspects Mr. Gassaway of being the author 
of certain offensive anonymous communications by letter. What truth 
(there is in such an accusation the Courts alone must decide. 



lUATEST ATOMS OF NE'WS OF FACT AND THOUGHT 



Latest from the Merchant'a Exchange.— New York, Aug. 2d, 
1878.— Gold opened at lOOi; 11 A.M., at 100^; 3 P.ai, at lOOJ. United 
States Bonds — Five-twenties of 1867, 105; 1881, 106^. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 83@4 864, short. Pacific Mail, 16^. Wheat, SI 15@S1 28, strong. 
Western Union, 89^. Hides, steady, fair demand, 19@19i. Oil— Sperm, 
86@88. Winter Bleached, 97® 105. Whale Oil, 40@45; Winter 
Bleached, 51@58. Wool— Spring, fine, 18@26 ; Burry, 10@14 ; Pulled, 
24@35 ; Fall CUps, 15@20 ; Burry, 14@18. London, Aug. 2d.— Liver- 
pool Wheat Market, 10s. @ 10s. 4d. Club, 10s. 3d. @ 10s. 8d. United 
States Bonds, 108§@107i Consols, 94 U-16@94 15-16. 

The annual election of raihroad offlcera was held on July Slat. Le- 
land Stanford, Charles Crocker, C. P. Huntington, D. D. Colton, N. T. 
Smith, J. L. Wilcutt, E. W. Hopkins, C. F. Crocker, J. O. B. Gunn, 
E. H. Miller, Jr., W. V. Huntington, E, P. Hammond, George E. Gray, 
C. J. Kobinson, W. E. Brown and R. Robinson, are the names of those 
gentlemen who were elected to fill the' various oflGces of the Central Pa- 
cific and other corporations under its control. 



For IdverpooL ^Messrs. Parrott & Co. have dispatched the fine clip- 
per ship Jabez Ho-iMes for Liverpool, with a valuable cai^o, valued at 
§200,000, consisting in part of Bone Dust, 530 sks.; Borax, 606bbls.; 
Copper Ore, 1,785 ctls. ; Canned Meats, 480 cases ; Honey, 300 cs. ; Salmon 
18,799 cases; and of Wheat, 29,653 ctls., and some other foreign mdse. in 
transit. 

Sixteen bars of bullion from the Hackberry mine arrived from Ari- 
zona on July 31st. Specimens of the ore can be seen at our office, assay- 
ing S600 to the ton. This is the best developed and most productive mine 
in the Territory. 

The Pacific Mail steamship City of Panama, Captain Seabury, 
arrived yesterday from Victoria, V. I., with a number of passengers. 
She left Esquimalt harbor at noon of July 30th, and experienced a thick 
fog throughout the passage. 

For the United Kingdom.— The ship Skakspeare was cleared on the 
1st inst. for Queenstown, with 26,660 ctls. Wheat, valued at §45,323. The 
Aetltelstan, same day, to Cork, with 26,258 ctls. Wheat, valued at §44,836. 

It may be interesting to know that, notwithstanding many re- 
ports to the contrary, Dan. C. Butterfield, Esq., is now in this city, 
much to the surprise of John Sevenoaks and John W. Pearson. 

Ziast week we noticed the arrival of the Chinese Ambassador, Chun 
Lan Pin, and suite. In this issue we present to our readers his portrait, 
together with that of Sit Ming Cook, the Consul at this port. 

From Honolulu we have the German bark Christine, 31 days, to Wil- 
liams, Blanchard & Co., with 5,902 bags, 1,194 kegs sugar, 721 bags rice, 
and 250 bbls. Islands molasses. 



From Greenock we have the German ship Gutenhurg, 128 days to 
Forbes Bros., \vith 200 tons pig iron, 396 tons coal, 116 cks. soda ash, 75 
M. fire bricks, etc. 

From Hongkong we have the ship Wandering Jew, 33 days, to Wil- 
liams, Blanchard & Co., with 7,359 bags rice, 1,100 cs. oil, 4,070 pes. 
granite, etc. 

From October 1876 to October 1877, England supplied foreign and 
colonial customers with 472,342 barrels of British beer, at a declared value 
of over $9,500,000. 

For Tahiti. — The Faloma, for Tahiti, has sailed with bread, 1,020 
cases; flour, 130 bbls., 155 hf. sks. and 1,510 qr. sks,, etc., all valued at 
829,000. 

In answer to numerous inquiries, we would state that Mr. Gassa- 
way's condition is still somewhat critical. 



For Mexico. — The Free Trade, for Mexico, carried 405 cs. coal oil, 400 
ctls. corn, and 4,000 qr. sks. flonr, etc. 

London, Aug. 2, 1878.--Late3t Price of Consols, 94 ll-16®15-ie. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, Oalifornla, 



a 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 8, 1878. 



DAIL7 PAPERS OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Although most of our local readers are doubtless familiar vith the 
characteristics of our leading daily papers, yet as California, and es- 
pecially San Francisco, is assuming considerable importance in the world, 
and as the world chiefly gleans its knowledge of our affairs from the loc^ 
press, it may not be out of place to give, as concisely as possible, a guide 
to the merits and demerits of our principal journals. Our most promi- 
nent "dailies" are five in number: the Bulletin, Alia, Chronicle, Call. 
Post and Examiner. We have endeavored, without retard to personal 
likes and dislikes, to place them thus in the order of their relative im- 
portance and general value, though, as we shall see below, some of them 
possess special features, which, with special readers, might change the or- 
der somewhat. 

The Bulletin is a substantial paper, with m^ny pretensions to respect- 
ability, and some small right to it. It is a paper that could not exist 
without a grievance, and it always takes care to have one — a sad habit, 
which rather palls upon its readers. Its editorials are fairly written, and 
certainly show abetter acquaintance with the subjects treated of than the 
leaders of its daily contemporaries. It is slow and torpid in dealing 
with local events, but feels its ground carefully, and is consequently much 
more trustworthy than if it went to the other extreme. The telegraphic 
columns are seldom^ "padded," and for that reason are seldom long or 
eensationaL Its frigid temperament makes it generally inoffensive, but 
when stirred up it waxes fmalicious, and then it lies without scruple. Its 
" clippings" and book reviews are exceptionally good. Its circulation is 
very moderate, but its seed falls in good ground for all that. 

The AHa is, above all, a reliable paper. Its fun is a little weak in cer- 
tain departments, and its news is of a somewhat dry nature, but it is too 
prosperous and self-reliant, too aged and cynical, to care much about the 
vanity of lying. It is the organ of the auctioneers, and a pretty 
fat thing it makes out of its oi^anism. It is the oldest paper in town, and 
is irreverently styled *' Grandmother " by its juniors and inferiors, but the 
old lady has little cant about her and is very conservative. Her editorials 
are not invariably of the strongest, but she always means well, and is 
never on the " crooked" side of any question. She prints what the wires 
send to her without any regard to the reader's feelings or her own, but 
in her local prejudices she belongs to a stiff-necked generation. 

The Chronicle is a fourth-rate imitation of the New York Herald, and 
therein it fulfills its highest ambition. Political and family scandals, 
criminal proceedings, and vituperation of its contemporaries form its 
choicest food. But it is also an insatiable scavenger of all sorts of news, 
and this virtue, together with its undeniable enterprise and pluck, have 
gained it a vast number of readers. It always has a cause to support, and 
just now it is doing itself and the community a great injury by puffing 
our "workingmen" communists. Its leading articles are invariably ear- 
marked by a "motive," either of spite or self-interest. Its foreign tele- 
grams are either stuffed, garbled, or manufactured. Its pride is in at- 
tempting to be a " live paper," and its strong point is self-glorification. 

The Call is a driveler — always behind the times in what it says and 
very weak in saying it. Its " literary style " is probably the worst in 
America — and that is no compliment. Nevertheless, it scoops together 
a good deal of information, and if one has not read a paper for two or 
three days, he cannot do better than refresh himself with the Call, if he 
can stand pidgeon-English. Its *' small advertisements " form the pride 
of its heart ; upon the number of these it dotes, and they really are a 
very cheap and useful institution. Of its editorials, the less said the 
better ; they never treat of a subject understood by the writer, and have 
all the peculiarities of ten-year-old schoolboy compositions. Its bete-noir 
is the Chronicle, which it never ceases to rail at, and as a natural conse- 
quence always gets the worst of it from its smarter and equally unscru- 
pixlous rival. In the matter of veracity, there is one point of difference 
between the Chronicle and the Call; the former surmounts facts, the lat- 
ter ignores them. Among the lower and more stupid classes, the Call has 
a wide circulation. 

The Fost is an indescribable little paper. It is newly fledged and is 
very anxious to become an " organ " of something, it doesn't exactly know 
what. It has puffed and spluttered over every leading topic that has 
come up since its recent birth, and still the worldrevolves as usual. Lately 
it has contained a series of leaders on European affairs, and these were 
sufficiently good to entitle it to dispense with its swaddling-clothes; but 
in its other original utterances the Post was a veritable infant until re- 
cently. There were, however, so many people who can only stomach the 
rudiments of literature, that its circulation was considerable, and now 
that the vigorous mind and pen of Mr. Jackson are devoted to its inter- 
ests, there is every reason to believe that the Post will soon cut out all 
competitors. 

The Examiner is nothing if it is not Democratic. !For all that it is a 
most respectable paper, and is conducted by a most worthy man. We 
never knew anybody whd read it, but it is the official organ of the city 
and county of San Francisco — hence its importance. We believe it con- 
tains local news, editorial comments, and telegraphic dispatches, but can- 
not speak from personal observation. 

BUSINESS BY RAHi. 
As a sample of the business done by some of our large importing 
houses over the Transcontinental Railroad, we take that of Messrs. Marcus 
C. Hawley & Co., whosupply a very large proportion of the agricultural 
implements used on this coast. From careful examination of the " re- 
ceipts per rail," we find that in the last four months that house has re- 
ceived from the East over two himdred and fifty car-loads of agricultural 
implements alone, to saynothing of building hardware, etc., the freights 
on which would be a fortune for any man of moderate pretensions. And 
yet, with these heavy receipts, the supply was no more than the demand 
made upon their resources by the farmers, to enable them to gather in 
this season's enormous crop. It pleases the JVewa Letter to record even one 
instance of increased business prosperity. 



President Davis had better stop smoking four-bit cigars, and teach 
his employes common politeness. The other morning a lady going South 
asked the conductor of the overland to hold, the train until she could send 
a boy over on the ferry and up to Natoma street, to fetch a baby she had 
forgotten in the hurry of leaving; but the surly brute refused. It 
wouldn't have taken over a couple of hours either. Hov? long are we to 
endure this cursed monopoly ? 




RATHER FISHY. 
*Fr]sco Belles at Santa Cruz, 

YousQ SwELLiNGTON {soUlogulzing) —" By Jove I the Cliff House seals are strolling 
away from home. Devilish graceful creatures, by Jove !" 

'I' M M ELEFHANT ORE MHiL. 

The parHcolar advantages claimed for the Elephant Ore, over theji 
present system of mills in use, are as follows: ' 

Wearing Parts. — The Elephant, having but two pairs shoes and dieSi«fi 
the wear on the eight extra pairs wliich would be used in a ten-stamp mill'1 
is consequently done away with; no cams, tappets, valves or cam shaft—? • 
such constant sources of wear and annoyance to millers^are used, audi I 
beyond the leathers which unite the spring with the stamp-head, and 
which would certainly not require replacing in less time than one yearj 
and which could always be obtained in the most inaccessible places, th* 
wearing parts of the Elephant are null. 

Power. — Where a ten-stamp battery requires an eighteen horse-powffl^: 
engine to run it, the Elephant can be easily run by an eight-horse engin^j 
This alone is a great item, and which will enable mines containing lowV 
parade ores, and which the present high cost of njilling will not allow of 
working, tn be turned into paying properties. 

■ Portability. — As the Elephant only weighs seven tons, the heaviest 
piece not weighing over one ton, it has a great advantage over a ten- 
stamp mill, the weight of which is in the neighborhood of sixteen tons. 
On this account the Elephant is particularly adapted for new mining coun- 
tries and camps, such as Arizona, Mexico, Cariboo and other places remote 
from the line of rail, and where freight is necessarily high; and although I 
the machine is comparatively light and easily handled, yet in case of se- 
vere handling, while on the road, there are no parts which could possibly 
get broken or injured in any way, thereby insuring the mine-owner 
against any delay in starting it up immediately on its arrival. 

Setting Up. — As no woodwork is required, beyond an ordinary shed to 
guard the machine against the inclemencies of the weather, it requires 
but little time to place the machine in working order. 

Believing a change of location, as well as a change of air, to be 
sometimes beneficial, Herrmann, the hatter, has moved his place of busi- 
ness from 402 to 336 Kearny street. His new establishment has been 
fitted up in a manner indicating good taste. He has the advantage of in- 
creased light, whereby the excellent quality and finish of his coverings for 
the head can be better observed; and altogether the new establishment is 
a vast improvement over the old. Herrmann has all the latest styles. 
New goods he is constantly receiving, and so extended is his business that 
a branch store, at 910 Market street, ia necessary to meet the wants of hia 
numerous customers. 

Hastings College of Law. — Prof essor John N. Pomeroy, of Rochester, 
New York, has been selected to lecture before the students of Hastings 
Law College, and is in town. The details of organizing the college, deter- 
mining the course of study, etc., will then be completed, and circulars 
containing all necessary information will be issued to applicants for ad- 
mission. About eighty-five have been registered. The course of study is 
to extend through three years, and the classes will be formed accordingly. 
Professor Pomeroy will conduct the preliminary examination of applicants 
at Pioneer Hall, on August 8th. 

Beerbohm's Telegram.— London amd Liverpool, Aug. 2d, 1878. 
Floatint? Cargoes, unaltered ; Cargoes on Passage, unaltered ; Liverpool 
Spot 'Upbeat, quiet ; No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 42s. Gd.@43s. ; ditto, for 
sliipment, SOs. ; Red Winter Off Coast, 43s. 3d. ; California Off Coast,: 
50s. ; ditto, nearly due, 493. ; ditto, just shipped, 46s. 6d. ; ditto, Club, 
10s. 4d. @. 10s. 8d. ; ditto, Average, lOs. Id. @ lOs. 4d. ; Red Western 
Spring, 8s. 10d.@93. 5d. ; English Country Markets, turn easier; French 
Country Markets, firm ; Consols, 94 11-16@94 15-16 ; Gold, J ; Sterling 
Exchange, 83@86i. 

St, Mary's College.— We desire to call attention to the fact that 
stucUes were resumed at the above institution Friday, August 2d. It ia 
desirable for scholars to be punctual in their attendance. 



Aug. 3, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



3 



BAJNQUirr TO OEICERAL FREMOKTT. 
Oeneral John C. Fremont, tlu' tiowiy appointed IJovernor of Ari- 
»n», Wii.i tho Kiil'itvt of ail nvution hy the New York Assofinted Pinneei"a 
rf l\ilif«»niia, un riiur>iii.iy evening hunt, ftt the Sturtevunt Hmme. The 
«c*,«ptitiii w;ks attondetl by nonrly nil the moiuliors uf the asHuciiktion. In 
he aliwnee of <ioner:\t Sutter, Presiik-nt of the eoeiety, Generul H. (-latea 
riU<on presitled. On his rij;ht was (.loneral Fremont aiul his two suns, 
•Vnuk and John 0.— the latter a Master in the Navy. On the left of the 
i*reaident siit ex-Governor Price, of New Jersey, Colonel Pittsall, Presi- 
lent of the New Jersey Mexican Veteran Association, and Oohmel 
Thorpe. Anion;; the pn>minent members were : Sickles, Secretary, Fr.'kn- 
;ui D. ('lark, t'oh'nel E. C Kimble, Stephen L. Merchant, Colonel Ben- 
on. Colonel Thorjw, J. J. McCloskey. and othonn. The dinin-^ hall of 
he Sturtevant House was well tilled. On the table wyre several pieces 
epresentinj; the early days of the journey overland, in the path of the 
;n;at PathKuder. The room was also tippropriatoly decorated with suit- 
ible mottoes and the " Bear" tiai; of the society. One of the most beaxi- 
iful pieces was an enormous l>ed of flowers, in the center of which was 
worked, in blue violets, "Jessie." This was sent to Mrs. Fremont, who 
ihortly returned a resi>ouse : 

"My grateful thanks for the lovely form of remembrance from the Pioneers. 

JkSSIK BB.VTON FllBMONT." 

After returning thanks to God for his bounties, the company sat down 
one of Leland's suppers. After the cloth had been removed. General 
Jilwon welcomed Fremont in a very feelinj' speech, which was warmly 
ipplaudcd. Fremont then responded in a snort speech, referring to the 
arly days of California, and also to the present of Arizona. Secretary 
Clark then read letters of regret from General Sherman, John T. Hol- 
lan, Postmaster James and Samuel C. Upham. of Philadelphia, the au- 
thor of a work now in the press, entitled "A Voyage ti> California, via 
Cape Horn, "in which he recited events in the life of Fremont, the honora 
bestowed upon him by the Kiuj,' of Prussia, through Baron Humboldt, in 
the bestouiuent of the Great Golden Medal; bis election as an honorary 
member of the GeogTa])hical Society of Berlin; the award of the Found- 
er's Medal by tlie Geographical Society of London, and other dignities 
conferred ui>on him; closing with an allusion to his civil and military 
career, and the fact of his title to his present office not being based on po- 
litical services. " He is not," said Ui)ham, " a bloated bondholder, 
which shows that he did not prostitute his position to purposes of private 
gain." Ex-Govenior Price, in a few remarks, gave reminiscences of the 
entry of Captain Fi-eraont into California, and his conflict with Jos^ Cas- 
tro, the military Governor of CaHfornia in 1844. Price continued in a 
similar strain, and predicted that G^^vernor Fremont would bring in an- 
other star to the good old flag, as the State of Arizona. General Fremont 
feelingly replied to the remarks of Price, after which Colonel Thorpe, of 
Mexican war fame, made a brief speech highly complimentary to Fre- 
mont and his wife. Colonel E. C. Kemble, an old newspaper man of 
California, then gave a description of the celebrated march from Monte- 
rey to Santa Barbara, and wished Fremont god-speed in his new field of 
hibor. Reminiscences of the early days of California were gone over by 
old pioneers, and at a late hour the company adjourned. 



The American Conunissiouers at Paris have been invited to an 
official drawing-room reception by President McMahon, and the agonizing 
question among them is as to what they ehall wear, a vague impression 
appearing to prevail that the proper sort of thing would be something like 
the apparel displayed by circus riders during the grand entree. On the 
other hand, it is not too much to say that the native Parisians cherish 
the delusive but deeply-rooted conviction that our representatives inva- 
riably assume buckskin leggings, coon-skin caps, and bowie knives on all 
occasions of ceremony. If we could^venture to suggest it, the best thing 
they could wear would be small clothes, taking care not to make the 
mistake that Algernon G. McFadden did the first time he waited on 
Napoleon III., after having been appointed First Secretary of the Amer- 
ican Legation. McFadden was both absent-minded and economical, and 
BO when he heard it was the proper thing to appear at court in small 
clothes, he simply cut off a pair of old black pants at the knee, and 
bought a pair of white silk long stockings. His appearance at the Tuille- 
ries created a sensation, at which he could hardly help feeling flattered. 
As he WAS sof Lly, though proudly, whistling " My Country 'Tis of Thee " 
to himself, an American friend approached him. "Where did you get 
that bathing suit, Mac ?" said the latter. *' Bathing suit?" exclaimed 
McFadden, looking down at a very unbleached pair of canton flannel 
drawers. '* Gre<it Ceasnr ! I wish I may be paralyzed if I havn't forgotten 
the stockings !" And they carried him out in a fit. 

RAILROAD FREIGHTS. 

The following dispatch was forwarded East by Leland Stanford, 

President of the Central Paciflc E-ailroad, yesterday morning: 

Sidney DiUon, President Union Pacific Railroad Company^ New York: — 
The proposed advance in rates from July 29th as per circular issued by 
your Freight Agent, Mr. Vining, we consider unwise. We recognize in 
you the same right to control rates from that side on freight coming West 
that you concede to ua on freight from here going East, but our idea is 
that instead of an advance In rates upon the classes of goods mentioned 
a reduction would be better, and we earnestly recommend that you direct 
the withdrawal of the circular. We think that some other way may be 
devised to protect ourselves against the impositions practiced by shippers, 
Leland Stanfokd. 

The card of Mr. Burr, of the Clay-street Savings Bank, denying un- 
der oath any irregularities in his transactions in connection with the busi- 
ness of that insHtution, we believe to be the truth, the whole truth and 
nothing but the truth. Mr. Burr's character for honesty of purpose and 
fair dealing in all his business relations is too well established for many 
years to require upholding at our hands; but we cannot permit to pass un- 
noticed the slander which might, with the ignorant, serve to injure his 
reputation and the standing of the corporation with which he is con- 
nected. The time may yet come when there will be quick punishment 
for those who, by false and malicious reports or assertions, do serious in- 
jury to reputation, and when it arrives there will be a check uijon those 
who now spit forth their venom with scarcely a chance of receiving the 
reward due the despicable crime of slander. 



QASSAWAY-STAPLES ASSAULT. 

Card from Mr. Gassa-way. 
T^^dltor News Iicttcr— l>cur Sir: Permit mo to nny thron^h 

*^ your cnhimiis, in reference to the cowardly assault mode upon mo by the man 
SUipk's, that it occurred jireciscly as stated by the Bulletin of Saturday lust, and not 
as per tlio obviously paid for accounts of a certain daily. I was rcadbig a note at tlio 
time, with my head bunt down, the fellow Staples crcoping up behind and striking 
mo senseless with a blow on the hack of the skull without my oven knowing of liis 
approach. This is the eccond attempt at would-be asaissination made by him, the 
first occurring some four months ago. when, with a gang of roughs, ho attempted to 
obtain unsuspected entrance to my bod-room at 2 o'clock in tho morning, evidently 
ot)unting upon attacking a sleeping and unarmed man. I have ample testhnony as 
to this. Since then I have passed this pattern coward fifty times in puolic —comment is 
supcrfiuous. As to his last made chat^ of my being concerned in writing anonyraoua 
letters, that tho comuig action before tho Grand Jury will simply show to be an infa- 
mous falsehood. At that investigation I trust to cause a ventilation of this scoun- 
drel that will result in benefit to the whole community. 
Aug. 3. F. H. GASSAWAY. 



TO THE PUBLIC. 

Editor " News Letter :" — I hereby deny explicitly tlie statements made 
by the witnesses in the case of the United States vs. W". B. Carr accusingma 
of demanding and receiving commissions for loans made to G. M. Pinney, 
upon certificates issued by R. C. Spalding as Navy Paymaster, and referred 
to by said witnesses. I further say that I never received, directly or indi- 
rectly, any commission or compensation whatever for making the loans re- 
ferred to by said witnesses, and that 1 never demanded or requested any 
such to be paid to me. £. w. BVBB. 

Subscribed and sworn to before mo, this Ist day of Au^st, 1878. 

Aug. 3. [suit. SAM'L S. MURFEY, Notary Public. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF KAMBCRO. 

Capitol $1,125,000, IT. S. Gold Coin. 

Losses Paid in Gold Colu Immeil lately Alter Adjnstineut. 
This Corporation holds contracts of twelve other European Insurance Compa- 
nies, re-insuring by far the greater part of every risk, as soon as accepted in our of- 
fice. The combined subscribed Capital which ourpolicies therefore offer to the public, 
jtntounts to , Of tvJiic?i 

$11,668,500, tr. S. Gold Coin, | $3,241,250 is Paid Up, 
Besides the Always ^Available Reserve JTu^t^s, 

GEOKGE MAflCUS & CO., General Agents for the PaciflcCoast, 
Aug. 3. 304 California street. 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 

Belmont Milling- Company. Ijocatioii of Principal Place 
of Business, San Francisco, California. Location of Worlrs, Philadelphia 
Mining District, Belmont, Nye county, Nevada. "N^otice is hereby given, that at a 
meeting of the Board of Directors, held on the 20th day of July. 1878, an assessment, 
No. 18, of 40 cents per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, Eoom 15, No. 310 Pine street, San Francisco, California. Any stock upon 
which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 2d day of September, 1878, will be 
delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment is made 
before will be sold on TUiSSDAY, the 24th day of September, 1S7S, to pay the delin- 
quent assessment, together with costs of advertising and exnenses of sale. By order 
of the Board of Directors. J."W. PEW, Secretary, 

Aug. 3. Office : Room 15, No. 310 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

VALLEJO WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS 

T^ow Open for the Reception of Ouests. H. Connolly, .AEnn- 

Xi ager. These Springs are situated three miles from Vallejo. The water cannot- 
be excelled in medicinal qualities. The climate is delightful, and those visiting the 
resort will find everything that is conducive to pleasure and comfort. 

These Springs have been fitted up at immense expense and with rare taate and 
judgment, and they stand confessedly as the most beautiful and charming place of 
resort to be found in the State of California. 

A Stage for passengers and baggage will connect with the morning and evening 
trains and boats from San Francisco at the North Vallejo Depot. Aug. 3. 

THE MINT OF THE UNITEDSTATES AT SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Superintendent's Office, July S9tli, lS7S.»On- and after 
August 1st, until further notice, the price paid for Silver at this Mint, in sums 
of ten thousand ounces and less, will be the equivalent of the London rate on the 
day of purchase, less one-half cent per ounce fine, payable in Standard Silver Dollars. 
Aug. 3. H. L. DODGE, Superintendent. 

REMOVAL. 

HERRM&NN, THE HATTER, 

—HAS REMOVED TO HIS NEW STOUF — 

336 KHAMlfr SXMEET, BMTWMJEIT BVSS ANI>'PIN1S, 

Wbere ho continues to sell the finest hats at tbe lowest prices. Aug. 3. 

Stewart Menzies. Eenrr Binsham. 

MENZIES & BINGHAM, " ^ 

stevedores. 

514 BATTERY STREET, SAN FBAITCISCO. [Aug. 3. 

" ST. MARY'S COLLEGE. 

studies will be Besamed at tbis Iiistltutiou, Friday, Aagr. 2d. 

[August 3.] 

Ohas. Wilson. 



E, E, Doyle, 



DOYLE & WILSON, 



Sbip and Freigrht Brolters, No. IS California street, San 
Francisco, California. Aug. 3. 



S' 



REVOLVER FREE. 

even-sbot RevolTcr witli Box Cartridgres. Address, 

August 3.1 J. BOWN & SON, 136 and 138 Wood St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK AND 



Aug. 3, 1878. 




JEZEBEL IN MODERN SOCIETY. 

A recent trial once more brought into prominence the terrible toil 
which women nndertake in the effort to make themnelves beautiful for a 
night. We heard all over again the disgusting story of the woful washes, 
the unholy ointments, and the pernicious powders, and have come near 
to being ashamed of our wives and sisters. The Jezebel of modern society 
stops far short of the crimes of her Hebrew prototype, but she justifies 
the analogy suggested, inasmuch as she "paints her face, and tires her 
head, and looks out of the window ;" and we can sympathize with the 
honest indignation of the rongh-handed Jehu who calls to those above to 
"throw her out." It cannot be said that the state of things disclosed 
was imknown. Men are greatly blind to this sort of thing. But it is im- 
possible to conceive that they do not know that many \yomen paint, that 
more powder, and that nearly every woman wears hair that is not her 
own. But they put the matter aside as being no particular business of 
theirs. To many women, one-half of existence would be a blank if it 
were not for this delightful toil of making themselves seem other than 
they are. But to do them justice they carry on the work of enchant- 
ment in secret. They burst upon the exasperatingly unenchanted sight of 
mankind fully powdered and bedizzened, and do not permit the creature 
for whose admiration they strive to observe the slow growth of the charm. 
Some artists do not mind exhibiting to their friends an unfinished picture. 
A woman operating upon herself, or with the assistance of her maid, does 
object to being on view when half "finished;" which is, indeed, about 
the only healthy sigh in connection with the undertaking. Here is a 
sample advertisement: 

"Miss A. Talbot, successor to Miss E. Talbot, thirty years lady's maid in the high- 
est circles of England, Paris and Spain, who will forward full descriptions in the 
new and beautiful art of getting up the face and eyes in the most brilliant style, 
with other recipes for the toilette standing uurivaled. Thirty stamps." 

— London Mat/fair. 

HOW TO MARRY ON £300 A YEAR. 

HoTv to marry on £300 a year was a subject made much of by 
journalists in one of the dull seasons some years ago. The problem was 
comparatively easy to solve by some millions of Englishmen and English- 
women, who would find a difficulty in seeing their way to marrying on 
lOs. a week. Even Dr. Johnson's very limited fare at one time of his 
life would not allow much for a wife if 10s. was the maximum weekly in- 
come. And yet the feat was accomplished by a man who started life on 
nothing at all except his very bare' keep, and ended with the very com- 
fortable income of £18,000 a year. How did he do it? He says that, 
while earning 10s. a week as a single man, he adhered to a vegetarian diet, 
the cost of which was about 3d. a day. That was Is. 9d. for food ; fuel 
and light cost him Is. G^d., and he had 6s. SW. left for other purposes. 
Of course he saved. Persevering, he managed to furnish a couple of 
rooms, and then married " very happily," and all on 10s. a week. This 
was how they made the money go: " We paid 3s. 6d. for three rooms. Is. 
for fuel, 3s. 6d. for food, and had 2s. for other contingencies. Our food 
consisted of bean stew three times a week, potato five times a week, pud- 
dings without eggs twice a week, carrots, turnips, or some green vegetable 
daily." Breakf;tst was porridge eaten with bread. They had tea some- 
times in the evening, but oftener cold water. About a year after marriage 
a son came, and there was a need for more, and the more came in an in- 
crease of wages to 18s. a week. This enabled them to take an Irish girl 
as a servant, she consenting to be a vegetarian too. At the end of his 
second year of married life, this thrifty fellow had £10 in hand, ^vith 
which he began to trade among his fellow men. The trading must have 
been conducted on good principles, for at the end of a year the £10 had 
grown to £150. Two years after, his savings were £1,500. His fortune 
increased, until now he has an income of £18,000 a year. How many of 
us would " go and do likewise," even with the certainty of the £18,000 at 
the end of the struggle ^— Truth. 



Talk about dividends. One Philadelphia fire insurance company an- 
nounces a semi-annual dividend of 20 per cent., and another a quarterly 
of 8 per cent. 



BANKS. 



NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

SAJIf :FJtA2fCISC0j CAJL. 

Paid TTp Capital $10,000,000, Gold,; 

SurplusOr.S. Bonds) $3,500,000, Gold. 

I>IRE<"TOBS : 

LoniB McLane President. | J. C. Flood Vice-President. 

Jolin W. Slackay, W. S. O'Brien. James G. Fau. 

Cashier H. W. Qlenny. 

Agent at Virginia, Nevada George A. King. 

Agents atNewTorkieQWallstO-C. T. Christensen, C.W. Church. 

Issues Commercial and Travelers' Credits, available in any part of the world. 

Makes Transfers of Money by Telegraph and Cable, and Draws Exchange at cus- 
tomary usances. This Bank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion, 

EXCHANGE on the Principal Cities throughout the United States, Enrope, Japan, 
China and the East Indies, the Australian Colonies and New Zealand, and on Hon- 
olulu, Hawaii 



New York Bankers.. 
London Bankers . . . . 



[May 25.] 



f The Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
■ (American Exchanoe Nat. Bank. 
( Messrs. Smith, Pavsb ASmithb. 
• \ TuE Union Bask of Ix)ND0n. 



THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $5,000,000. 

WH. ALVORD President. 

THOMAS BKOWN, Casbier | B. MUKSAT, Jr., Ass'i Casbicr 

Agents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfomia ; Boston, Tremoot National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Vii^nia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior To^vns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort^on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Locarno, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama. Nov. 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorpornted by Boyal CbHrter.— Capital paid np, 91,800,- 
000, with power to increase to 310,000,000. Southejist comer California and San- 
some streets. Head Office- -5 East India Avenue, London. Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon; Victoria and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Clieck 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Chicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal ; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland— Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America— London Bank of Mexico and South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Dank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank of Australasia, Commercial Banking Comjany of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

\VM. H. TILLINGHAST, FRED'K TOWNSEND, 

May 18^ ^ Managers. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLD B ANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid ap Capital S'-S, 000,000, Gold. President, B. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :~R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C. G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, D. D. Colton, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents — London : Baring Bros. & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Hottinguer& Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Eos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available iu Eiu-ope, Chiua and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, S5;00*,000,of n-bicb $3,000,000 is fally paid np a» 
present capital. Reserve Fund, $iS0,00O. San Francisco Office, 424 Califor- 
nia street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Assistant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN; Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. London 
Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, 
Jtorgan & Co. ; Boston, Tliird National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact 
all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business iu London and San Francisco, 
and between said cities and all parts of the world. March 30. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 

A £)4> Calirornia street, Sau Francisco.— I^iidon Office, 3 

'4t.-^.-^ Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligraan k Co. , 21 Broad street. 
Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buv and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Cre.dit available throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, 1 m.,t,«™™ 

ION. STEINHART, f J"^nager8. 
P. N. LILIENTHAL. Cashier. Oct 4. 

A. J. Plate, H. A. Plate. W. B. Cotkel. 

A. J. PLATE & GO., 

Importers aud Dealers in Gnus, Kifles, I>lst«ls, Sporting: 
Material, 
Masonic, I. O. O. F. and SlUitary Goods of £very Description. 

— SOLE A0EST8 FOR THE — 

Celebrated Seminffton Arms, 

510 Sacramento street, between Montgomery and Sansome streets, S. F. 
^g* New Work Made to Order. July 13. 



Aug. 3. 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISEU. 



IN THE NEST. 
Gftther tliom cKiae ^^^ your loving heart — 

Cr.-wUe them on ynur lireaiit : 
They will soon enough leavu your hnnnlins care, 
Soon enouiih mount youth's topmuHt etair — 

Little ones in the nest. 
Fret not that the chiMren'n hearts aro gay. 

That their restletw foet will run ; 
There may conio a time, in the hy-and-lty, 
When you'll ait in yonr lonely room and eigh 

For a sound of cluUlinh fun ; 
Wlien you'll loii;j for a repetition sweet 

That sounded throuijh each room. 
Of " Mother," " Mother." the dear love-calls 
That will echo long in the ailcnt halls, 

And add to their stately gloom. 
There may come a time when you'll long to hear 

The eager, boyish treatl, 
The tuneless whistle, the clear, shrill shout, 
The busy bustle iu and out, 

And pattering overhead. 
When the boys and girls are all g^o^vn up 

And scattered far and wide, 
Or gone to the undiscovered shore, 
Where yonth and age cume nevermore. 

You will miss tnem from ynur side. 
Then gather them close to y«ur loving heart, 

Cradle them on your breast ; 
They will soon enough leave your brooding care, 
Soon enough mount youth's topmost stair — 

Little ones in the nest. 

AN ENTIRFLY NEW ANECDOTE ABOUT CHARLES 
MATHEWS. 
We are glad to add our mite to the innumerable anecdotes of the 
late Jaraented English actor, Cliarles Mathews. One night, about six 
years ago, while the comedian was playing at the Haymarket, he noticed 
that a very grave and much bored looking man occupied the right-band 
stage-box. His attention was the more readily called to the circumstance 
inasmuch as the boxes at that otherwise popular theater are in very little 
request, and one bad never been taken before in his experience. The 
apectatof in question, however, seem*?d determined not to be amused; in 
fact, he watched the admirable drollery of London's pet with provoking 
indifference. His cynical want of interest became at length almost exas- 
perating to the actor, and considerably affected his temper. Taking ad- 
vantage of being a few feet from the box in one scene, Mathews glanced 
at the saturnine spectator and said in an " aside:" '*This isn't a fifneral, 
my man; this is a comedy." "Is it, indeed?" retorted the other, con- 
temptiiously. "Glad to hear it, really — thought it was a tragedy." "I'll 
het you ten pounds I'll make you laugh before I'm through," returned 
the actor, angrily. "Done," said the man in the box, and promptly 
whipping out his pocketbook, he laid a ten-pound note on the box railing. 
By this time the audience had caught what was going on, and listened to 
the latter portion of the colloquy with Interest. Seeing this, Mathews, 
with characteristic readiness, took a similar note from his pocket and 
gravely handed both to the leader of the orchestra as stake-holder. The 
play was then proceeded with, the audience watching both the comedian 
and the stolid countenance of the other better with keenest interest. 
Mathews fairly outdid himself, but although the audience frequently went 
into hurricanes of laughter, not a mnsnle of the other man's face moved. 
The last act was nearly done, and Mathews quite in despair, when the 
action of the piece required him to take a foreign paper from his pocket, 
open the wrapper, and, after reading an item or two, stumble upon one 
referring to a long lost child, etc. The paper the comedian used on this 
occasion happened to be a Neios Letter received that day, and he mechan- 
ically began reading the first article in the Town Crier column. As he 
progressed, the utter absurdity of whatever it was caused him to forget 
his chagrin for a moment, and he began laughing himself in good earnest. 
Soon the audience followed suit, and as he reached the point of the ar- 
ticle, a tremendous roar from the box told him his enemy had also suc- 
cumbed. The man in the box was tumbling around holding his sides, 
and laughing himself purple in the face. It was impossible to continue 
the performance, and amid the wild cheers of the entire house, Mathews 
gravely accepted the stakes from the leader, and the curtain was rung 
down. All this might have happened anywhere easily enough; but now 
comes the strange and startling part of the story. About two years after 
that, the same box was offered by the management to the Ahkoon of 
Swat, who was then visiting London. No sooner had that potentate en- 
tered, than one of his suite complained at the office that there was a skel- 
eton in one of the chairs. It was, indeed, true. The solemn man, once 
started, had laughed himself into an apoplectic fit, and had perished mis- 
erably, with no kindly soul near to soothe his dying brow or request the 
orchestra to play slow music. The saddest part of this story is that it is 
perfectly true, unlike all the others not bearing our trademark. 

THE SIAM ROYAL FAMIIiY. 

The Royal family of Siam is rather of an extensive one, for we see 
that the present King has twenty-one brothers and twenty-five sisters. 
The list of the living members of the royal family of Siam has been pub- 
lished in the Siam Advertiser, and we learn from it that there were as 
many as seventy-nne princes of Siam living at one time, and that the late 
King had thirty-five wives iu his harem and by them eighty-four chil- 
"dren. The late second King of Siam had thirty-one wives and sixty- 
three children. Those women who bear children in the royal harem re- 
ceive some consideration from the King, but the others are unnoticed. 
It is stated that it is possible for Buddhist Kings, like the Incas of Peru, 
to have their sisters in their harems. The present King of Siam was the 
ninth child of his father. — Hongkong Daily Press, 

'* Truth " says : The portrait of Lord Beaconsfield in the " season" 
number of Vanity Fair is an excellent one. It is not a caricature, 
but a likeness, although not, perhaps, a flattering one. This colored en- 
graving of Lord Beaconsfield may be seen at the S. P. News Letter 
office— /rcc of ckarge / 



LETTERS FROM THE PEOPLE. 

[ From the lMiU(9 of To-morrow. J 

To Correspoadents. — Write with pen and ink, or with pencil, and 
on paper. Don't write on more than two sides of the pai>er, if you don't 
wish t(t give your own give some other persons name. 

Why should the spirit of mortal be proud? Kero C. Nyle. 

We don't know. 

Who struck William Pattison ? ToM Tibb.s. 

We have carefully examined the lists of killed and wounded, both in 
the recent riots in our city and in the East, but we are unable to find the 
name of the above mentioned gentleman ; will Mr. Tibbs give us further 
particulars ? 

If an apple tree throws a shadow of seven feet and four inches at half 
past ten in the forenoon and a shadow of four feet and seven inches at 
twenty minutes after two in the afternoon, give the altitude of that 
tree. ZoziMus. 

The question is too simple. 

Is Tony Pastor a Pole ? Adam Goodman. No ; we think he is a stick. 

If one of the Committee of Safety knock me down, what would you 
recommend me to do ? C. BlEACH. 

We would recommend you to get up. 

If a man is born in leap-year can he jump farther or higher than any 
one else ? B. Gollt. 

Ask us another. 

I lost all my washing about a week since by the hoodlums burning out 
the wash-house I patronize, since which time I have been without a change 
of linen. If I present my wash-ticket to the Mayor, will he give me a 
shirt, handkerchief, collar and a pair of socks ? 

LiTERA SoniPTA Manet. 

You had better ask him. 

Do you know where a hard-working, respectable man could find a de- 
cent boarding house ? The reason I ask is that Mrs. Gillhooly, on ac- 
count of her approaching nuptials with Bandy Pat Finnigan, declines 
housekeeping ? TiM FoGERTY, Tar Flat. 

Try the Palace or Baldwins. 



The success of wholesale heating by steam at Lockport, N. Y., where 
during last Winter a large section of the city was comfortably warmed by 
steam distributed through street-pipes, has led to the formation of a com- 
pany with a big capital for the introduction of the system in New York 
city. 

SAVINGS AND LOAN. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Dentache Spar niiU Ijcihbank, Mo 528 Callforniastreet, San 
Francisco. Oi't'iCBRs : President, L. GOTTIG. Board ok Diiiectors. — Fred. 
Roeding, Chaa. Kohler, Dan. Meyer, Edw. Kruae, George H. E^gen^, N. Van Bergen, 
H. L. Simon, Claus Spreckels. Secretary, GEO. LETTE ; Attorney, JOHN R. 
JARBOE. May 18. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK, 

G1TABANTEE CAPITAI*, 



$300,000. 

Officers: Presi<lent, John Parrott; Tice-Presldent, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Oct, 14. 



411 



FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Bnshstreet, above Kearny, O. Matae, Director. I<oans 

made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of tb.e Hibernia Savings and Zioan Society, 

N. B. Cor. Montgoinery and Post Streets, 
San JBranciaco, J'uly 24, 187S. 

At a resrnlarmeetingr of the Board of Direetor.s, held this 
day, a Dividend at the rate of 7^ per cent, per annum was declared on ail De- 
posits for the six months ending July 21st, 187S, payable from and after this date, and 
free from Federal Tax. [July 27. J EDW. MARTIN, Secretary . 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Savlng^s anil liOau Bank, No. 6 Post street, Ata- 
sonic Temple, San Francisco. — At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this 
Bank, held July 20, 1S7S, a Dividend was declared at the rate of seven and one-half 
(7i) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and six and three-tenths (6 .3-10) per cent, 
per annum on ordinary deposits, for the semi-annual term ending; July 21, 1878, pay- 
able on and after July 25, 1878, free from Federal Tax. 
July 27. H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savlngrs anil I<oan Society, U19 Clay street. --At a meeting: of 
the Board of Directors, held this day, a dividend, free of Federal Tax, of seven 
and one-half (7i) per cent, per annum, was declared on all deposits, for the term end- 
inpr June 29th, 1878, payable on and after July 15th, 1878. 
July 13. CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Frencli Savlngrs and lioan Society, 411 Bnsli street.— The 
French Savinjfs and Loan Society has declared a Dividend of seven and one- 
half (7J) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, for the half-year ending June 30, 
1878, payable on and after July l7th, 1878. By order. 

July 20. GUSTAVEMAHE, Du-ector, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug 3, 1878. 



THEATRICAL, ETC. 



BaldvTin's Academy ol Muaic— Boucicault's drama of The Long 
Strike was the means of bringing Mr. J. H. Stoddart, the well known 
Eastern actor, before us in the character of " Moneypenny, " a creation 
in which he has already achieved considerable success. The play, like 
the majority of Boucicault's efforts, is wanting in many respects, and 
falls short of that completeness which is necessary for the proper dra- 
matic elucidation of a story. It begins at the wrong end, and has its strong- 
est attraction in the first act. It was, however, the actor, and not the 
play, which drew the audience. Mr. Stoddart'.s acting as the incongruous 
old lawyer may be styled— variegated. In the first act he was decidedly 
good, his rendition of the various phases of human nature — passing from 
the meanest to the most generous sentiments — in his interview with "Jane 
Learoyd," being really excellent. But later he became so excessive in his 
acting, so grotesque in his delineation of " Moneypenny's " eccentricities, 
as to detract from the somewhat high opinion we had formed of him. In 
the Court-room scene his acting exceeded the bounds of nature, and be- 
came absolutely fantastic. Miss Sylvester increased rather than allevi- 
ated the monotonous whine with which she destroys all pretense of indi- 
viduality in her acting. She played the part in a lachrymose and inani- 
mate manner altogether devoid of character, and showing a general dis- 
inclination to do her best. Mr. Morrison did his best as " Jim Starkey," 
but failed to master the Lancashire dialect sufficiently to render his con- 
ception acceptable. Mr. Heme played " Noah Learoyd " fairly, and the 
rest of the support was up to the usual standard of excellence. The set- 
tings were, as usual, very good. Next week we are promised Dmrer than 
Life, 

Bush Street Theater. — Very little change has been made in the pro- 
gramme at this house this week, if we except the addition of an alpha- 
betical song to Mr. Tony Pastor's repei-toire, to which, we scarcely need 
add, it is decidedly not an improvement. Besides this musical eccen- 
tricity, be repeated his idiotic Jiabi/ Mine, the original of which appeared 
in the papers quite a while ago. It is to be regretted that several even- 
ings the management omitted the act of Bryant and Hoey, one of the 
most successful and popular items of the programme. The dancing of 
Miss Kitty O'Neil was improved this week by a vocal addition, which, 
we need scarcely say, was fully up to the generally excellent standard of 
this clever lady'i performances. The act of Mr. Kennedy was not varied, 
although the programme would lead the audience to believe so. Barry's 
act of Indian Affairs was not so good as usual, although he is full of the 
comical element. The sisters Irwin are pretty enough to be more suc- 
cessful than they have been hitherto ; il they could find some one to ar- 
range more appropriate acts for them, their success might be assured. 
The Haverly Minstrels return to this house next week, strengthened by 
Gus. Williams, Hugh Dougherty and Billy Sweatnam. 

California Theater.— Diplomac?/ in its third week has drawn even 
larger audiences than it did during the earlier portion of its performance. 
With the exception of a tendency to overact, and occasionally to guy the 
characters, it runs with a smoothness consistent with the long association 
of the actors with their parts. Unfortunately, there has been some mis- 
understanding between Miss Jeffreys-Lewis and the management, and 
the result has been a depreciation in the great results this lady had ols- 
tained. Her acting is now a /i((/c too forcible, and at times approaches 
the confines of— rant. This is the more to be regretted considering the 
excellence of her earlier performances. In the scene with " Baron Stein," 
in which " Zicka " expre>*ses her detestation for *' Dora," the climax is 
reached with the agonized exclamation, "I hate her! " In this portion of 
the scene Miss Jeffreys-Lewis has replaced her former intense earnest- 
ness with a considerable amount of superfluous gesture and loud invect- 
ive, which greatly mars the general aspect of the creation. Otherwise 
the play and its rendition remain the same, Mr. Montague having com- 
pletely recovered his voice. 

The P. C. S. S. Co.'s Excursion to Santa Cruz.— These excursions 
to the Long Branch of the Pacific Coast have grown very popular, judg- 
ing from the number who throng their steamers every Saturd!ay. To-day 
the well known steamer Ancon, Captain Debney, with the courteous 
purser, McWattie, in the office, will leave at 1 p. m. Extra inducements 
will he offered to excursionists to-day, as Captain Fritz's company. Union 
Guard, will be amongst the passengers, accompanied by the famous Sec- 
ond Regiment band. Mine host Hoadley, presiding over the Pacific Ocean 
House at Santa Cruz, will cater to the wants of the weary. 

Messrs. Knopfel and Goffiie have made arrangements to give a 
aeries of grand popular concerts every Saturday afternoon, at 3 o'clock, 
commencing next Saturday, August 10th. The admission will be 25 
cents, or, for the series of five concerts, one dollar. The best available 
talent, both vocal and instrumental, will be secured, and as choice a pro- 
gramme as has ever been offered in th« city may be looked for. Mr. 
Kn()pfel will preside at the grand organ, which is the largest instrument 
on the Pacific Slope. Mr. Goffrie is well known as a solo violinist, lately 
from London. 

There will be a grand complimentary benefit tendered to Samuel 
M. Fabian, the talented young California pianist, at the Metropolitan 
Temple, Thursday evening, August 8, 1878. 

On the 31st ult the Sutro Tunnel had made the extraordinary pro- 
gress of 102 feet since the last measuring day, July 22d, and now has a 
total length of 20,210 feet from its mouth. A covered drain, to carry off 
the hot water of the mines, will be commenced as soon as the west wall 
of theComstock is struck, the cutting of which will probably require 
from six to eight months, as it will he three feet square and four ndles in 
length, and excavated from the solid rock. With the powerful draft 
sweeping through the tunnel, an open stream of water flowing through 
the same at a temperature of 160 degrees, would create an atmosphere of 
steam that would be fatal to life. The Savage mine is now becoming 
much cooler on the 2,000-foot level ; the thermometer now stands at 94 
degrees, when it marked 120 degrees before the connection was made with 
the tunnel. 

"We have had the pleasure of meeting Mr. John Samson, civil and 
mining engiueer. lately in the service of the Government of Chili, S. A. 
During his residence in that country, Mr. Samson has been instrumental 
in introducing a system of transportation bt/ suspended wire-rope tramicai/s 
for the carriat/c nf 7nincrafs orer rough countries. 




(j I -i~ 



H. £. Chun Lan Pin, ChineBe Ambassador. 



BALDWIN'S THEATER. 

Thomas Itfagnirc, Mniia^'er; Frcil. L.y.ster, Acting- mann^er; 
G, R. Chipnia.1!, Treasurer. Instanfcmcous and Brilliant Suct-ess of the Cel- 
ebrated Character Actor, MR. J. H. STODDART, attested by reiicitcd reoills before 
the curtain and tempests of applause. Saturday, Auguat 3d, THE LONG STRIKE. 
"Moneypenny," MR J. H. STODDART. FIRST STODDART MATINEE this(Sat- 
urday) Afternoon at 2 o'clock. Sunda\— Last Performance of THE LONG STRIKE. 
Monday, Augu st 5tli— DEARER THAN LIFK. " Aug 3. 

BUSH STREET THEATER. 

Clinrles E. jMCke, Proprietor.— This Saturday ETenlD);. 
August 3d, last night but one of TONY PASTOR and his ENTIRE GREAT 
TROUPE. The Best Proj,Taniine of thu Engagement. All the Great Siiecialtj' Acts 
to-night. LAST TONY PASTOR MATINEE SATURDAY. Sunday Next, Grand 
Benefit to TONY PASTOR'S TROUPE. Monday. August 5th— Haverly'8 MinstrelB in 
conjunction with the universal favorites, GuB Williams, Dougherty and Billy Sweat- 
nam — the greatest Minstrel Combination ever organized. Aug. 3, 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Barton A I^awlor, Managers; BartouHill, Acting KfaDfiger. 
Week commencing Monday, August 5th, last week of DIPLOMACY, and of 
MR. H. .7. MONTAGUE and his New Yolk Company. 

Friday Evening, Auirust 9th Farewell BeneDt of MR. MONTAGUE. 

LAST DIPLOMACY MATINEE SATURDAY. 

Monday, August 12th— Brief Engagement of the Celebrated Artiste, MISS M-\GGIE 
MITCHELL, who will appear as MIGNON. Aug. 3. 

MADAME JULIA MELVILLE SNYDER, 

/^~| O Mason street, between Busli and matter... Vocal RInsic 

Vf _LO for Opera, Concert ur Parlor. Piano and Elocution, Dramatic Elocution 
and Voice Culture Specialties. Terms made known at residence. May 25. 

NOTICE. 

Presidents, Secretaries and Managing Directors of Mining 
Companies. 

Please prepare your reports for tbe "Pacific Coast Annual 
Mining: Review and Stoek Ledger," the necessary Blanks for which have been 
left at the different Mining Offices. 

It is respectfully suj^ested that the Report should embrace ; A brief history of 
the mine and a description of the company's works, machiner3% etc. ; a synopsis of 
the Superintendent's annual reptirt ; the Treasurer's exhibit, etc. 

Stockholders and the stock-dealing jmblic g-enerally desire a statement of the 
amount of money received and d'sburscd, and for what purposes. They also desire 
to know what work has been done, and what is in progress. Give the people the 
facts in relation to the mines. Remember that in addition to the immense edition 
that will be printed for home circulation, thousands will go into the hands of cap- 
italists in the Eastern, Western and Southern States, and thousands into Europe 
and Asia. 

Let every mine on the coast be represented in the Directory department, and let 
every mine x>ossessing merit and fair prospects be well written up in the Editorial 
department 

If there is a Secretary in the city that has not received blanks for his Reports, let 
him send his name at once to R. S. LAWRENCE, Editor, Room 75, Russ Ilouse. 
Correspondence. 

Gentlemen in the interior to whom we have addressed Circulars will please send in 
their Reports at the earliest practicable moment. Send us all the facts in relation to 
the District and each particular mine. The influence of the publication will be 
worid-wide. 

The work will be published by the old and reliable house of Francis & Valentine, 
517 Clay street. July 20. 

A YOUNG LADY 

Of refinement desires a position asi Governess or Compan- 
ion. Is competent to teach En^^Ush, French, Music and Drawing. Address 
GO\'ERNESS, News Letter Office. June 8. 



E. H. Tharp. 



THARP & KNOX. 



Geo. T Enox, 



Notaries Public and Commissionersof Deeds, No. Sieaiont- 
gomery street. Loans made on approved Securities. "Real Estate bought and 
sold. Collections made. June 8. 

CASTLE BROTHERS, 

ESTABIilSHED IN THE YEAH 1850. 

Importers of Tens and East India Ooods, Bfos.213 aud 215 
Front street, San Francisco. ' Jan. 13. 

R. H. LLOYD, 

Attorney-at-Iiav, Roozn 13. Nevada Block. 



Aug. 3, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




Sit Ming- Cook, Chinese Consul, San Francisco. 

THE SEWERS. 

The Street Saperintendeat has presented htit annual report as to 
the cii-tt and condition of the sewers. The total leng1.h of new sewers 
constructed during the year ending' June 30th, was 9.6 miles. This is less 
than half that which was completetl in the year ending June, 1877. Only 
one uiile of hrick sewer was built in the year, costing about §100,000. 
Cement sewers were intrtxluced in the year 1S71, and there are now 
about 14.4 miles. We are glad to observe that this kind of sewers is 
going out of fashion, and that iron stone is coming in. In the year end- 
ing June, 1877, 8,164 yards of cement-sewer w;is put down at a cost of 
$64,434. Last year only 3,000 yards were used, at the cost of 618,081. Iron 
stone was first used 3 yeai-s ago, and already ten miles and a half have 
been put down. If this kind of sewer is properly laid it is undoubtedly 
the best- Wooden sewers are rapidly going out of use, as less than a 
mile was constructed last year. The expenditure on these sewers in 1876- 
77 was §26,953, and only 56,707 this year. It is satisfactory to observe 
that the cost of .sewer construction has been considerably reduced. Cement 
sewers in 1876-77, cost $2 63 per foot; in 1877-78, SI 95. Iron stone in 
1877 cost S2 48 per foot, and in 1878 S2 18. Brick sewers cost S7 49 per 
foot in 1877, and §6 19 per foot in 1878. 

One hundred and nineteen miles of sewers have been made since 1856. 
We should prefer to know how many miles remain really efficient. We 
fear a large reduction would have to be made. Considering that there are 
upwards of 300 miles of streets, and that the Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany have 200 miles of mains, it is evident that very many streets are 
still without sewers, and it is to be hoped that the Street Superintendent 
will be more energetic during the present year. 

We have no record of the number of sewers which have required recon- 
struction, nor indeed of the cost of repairs. In 1876 the report informed 
us that reconstructed redwood sewers cost S9,770. 

It is notorious that bad mortar and soft bricks have been put into many 
of the sewers, and unfortunately it is the interest of contractors to use 
soft and badly burned bricks, which cost less in labor and cement to set 
them. The public ought to know how quickly such sewers become useless 
and now expensive is their re-construction. The Superintendent ascribes 
the unsatisfactory condition of the sewers to the severity of the last sea- 
Bon» but if sewers arfe properly constructed and adequately supplied with 
storm outlets, they should be able to resist any freshet to which they are 
likely to be exposed. The bad condition of the McAllister street sewer, for 
example, was well known, and surely ought to have been remedied long ago, 
and if the lower sewer levels become choked with sand the pent up sewage 
w V. inevitably burst up roadways if there are no storm outfalls provided for 
its escape. The Superintendent states that the connections between the 
house drains and the sewers have bean imperfectly made, and are a fre- 
quent cause of breaks in the sewers. In no other city in the world are people 
allowed to make their own counections, and the Supervisors will be highly 
blamable if they do not at once undertake this duty. It is remarkable 
that no expenditure for cleaning the sewers appears in the reports until 
four years ago, when §15,000 was appropriated for that purpose and SIO,- 
000 for repairs. The same amount was spent in 1876, and §13,608 in 1877; 
312,077 50 was spent in cleaning last year. But it is notorious that many 
sewers are still completely choked up. It is high time that the question 
of sewerage should be reconsidered from beginning to end. The present 
system is blundering, inefficient and costly, and the longer the question 
is delayed the greater will be the sacrifice of money and of life. 



Anderson & Irving, of 219 Montgomery street, are now selling off 
their large and vai-ied assortment of gentlemen's furnishing goods. Those 
desirous of increasing their stock of first-class underwear will study their 
interests by inspecting the bargains offered. All the latest styles will be 
found, and those who are most fastidious respecting the fit of a shirt, the 
shape of a collar or style of necktie will be sure to go away satisfied. 
Their prices are marked down to a low ngure, so that a well-filled purse is 
not required in order to enable one to possess a favorable appearance. It 
is rarely that a more favorable opportunity is offered, and we are sure 
that all those who study economy, but who at the same time wish to be 
well dressed, will not fail to take advantage of it. 



The Cosmopolitan Hotel is not closed, and it ia not my intention to 
close it, newspaper reports to the contrary notwithstanding. It will be 
open as usual, the change being merely from the American to the Euro- 
pean plan. H. H. Pearson. 



SANITARY NOTES. 

Seventy-two deaths om^urri'd this week as compared with 84 last and 
93 for tlic coi'i-r.^piMiiIiiig wt?L-k l:u*t 3'ear. Ot' tlKse 7 wore (Miinese, 2 airci- 
dental, and 2 snicid;d. I'ifty-two were males and 20 females. Only 19 
were under 1 year, whilst 33 were between 20 and 50 years. Only one 
person died of old sige. The zymotics were: 5 typhoid, 3 cholera infan- 
tum, and 1 wliO(>i)ing cough. Apojjlexy and brain disea.'^e caused each 
2 <]oath», heart disoaao 6, cimsumption 12, and pneumonia only 2. The 
chief mortality was in the Fourth and Eleventh Wardw, viz., 10 and 14 
respectively. There were 13 deaths in public institutions. The eo<»l 
atmosphere and quick winds are particularly favorable to the ]jublic 
health. Whooping cou"h is still prevalent, and is apt to assume a very 
persistent character. A spell of warm weather is ret^uired for its com- 
plete relief. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Coiii|>aii.v''H Mteanicrtt will huII at* I'ollutvH at 12 M.: 
CITY OF TOKIO, September 1st, for YOKOH.UIA and HONGKONG. 

COLIMA. August fitli, for PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at MAZATLAN, 
SANBLAS, MANZANILLO. ACAPULCO and SAN JOSK DE GUATEMALA, connect- 
ing at Acapuico with Ctmipany's Steamer for all Central American ports. Tickets 
to and from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates. 

ZEALANUIA, AajfUStBth, at 12 o'clock, m., or on arrival of the English mails, 
for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. $10 additiooiU is char^'ed for pas- 
sage in Upper Saloon. 

CITY OF PANAMA, August lOth, for VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE 
and TAO.iMA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for PORT- 
LAND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 a.m. on day of sailing, at 
Wharf OtHcc. For freight or passage apply at the office, cor. First and Brannan sta. 

Augusts. WILLIAMS. BLANCHARD & CO., Agents. 

OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Direct Mall I^iiie tu Portland and Astwria.—Reg'alar Steam- 
ers to PORTLAND, from San Francisco, leaving EVERY FIVE DAYS from 
Folsom-street wharf.— New Iron Steamships GEORGE W. ELDER, CITY OF CHES- 
TER and OREGON, connecting: at Portland, Orejjon, with Steamers and Railroads 
and their connecting- Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washingtoa and Idaho 
Territories, British Columoia and Alaska. Throutjh Tickets at reduced rates to Ta- 
coma, Seattle and all points io Washington Territory. Freight received daily. For 
passage or freight apply at the office of the company. No. 210 Battery street. 
June 22. K. VAN OTERENDOKP. Agent. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers ol this Company will sail from Broadway Wharf 
for PORTLAND, Oregon), every 5 days, direct, and for LOS ANGELES, SANTA 
BAEBABA, SANTA CRUZ. SAN DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
ciaco Daily Papers. 

Ticket Office, No. 214 Moutgromery Street, near Piue. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
March 16. No. 10 Market street. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japau aud Chiua, leave wharf, comer First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC Thursday.May IGth, Friday, Aug. 16th, Saturday, Nov. 16th. 

OCEANIC Tuesday, June 18th, Tuesday, Sept. 17th, Tuesday, Dec, 17th. 

BELGIC Thursday, August 1st, Wednesday, October 10th. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 2 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
DAVID D. COLTON, President. July 27. 

FOR NEW YORK. 

Dispatcli Iiizte, from Vallejo-street "Wharf. 

The new Al Clipper Ship " M. P. Orace," R, P. Wilbur, 
Commander— This splendid ship goes into berth with large engagements, and 
will receive Quick Dispatch. For balance of freight early application will be neces- 
sary. GEORGE HOWES & CO., 302 California street. 
Consignees in New York: Messrs. Sutton &i Co. July 27. 

IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS 

Of I.EA * JPEBKINS' SAUCE, whicli Hre calculateil to de- 
ceive the public, I,EA AJKD PERKINS liave adopted A NEW LABEL 
BEARING THEIR SIGNATURE, LEA & PERRINS, which is placed on every bottle 
of WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE, and without wliich none isgenuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS' Sauce, and see name on wTapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per. Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Blackwell, 
London, etc., etc.andbygTocersandoilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 
Dec. 1. MESSRS. CROSS & CO., San Francisco. 

""^ \ isr PBINTS -ss 

BRXJCE, |-537 SACRAMENTO STEBET. 

) BELOW MONTGOMEEY. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the nnder- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary, 

Oct. 23. 730 Montgumery street. 

HARRY N. MORSE'S 

(Ex-Sheriff of Alameda County) 

Detective and Collection Agency, Sale Deposit Building, 
328 Montgomery street, Room 12, Third Floor. Take the Elevator. Oakland 
Office, in the Glascock Building, corner Washington and Seventh streets, up stairs. 
A. B. LAWSON, Manager for Oakland. This Agency is prepared to do all LEGITI- 
MATE detective business intrusted to its care. It does not operate for contingent 
rewards, and is independent of government or municipal control. July 27. 

fABER, HARKER & CO., ' " 

Successors to Phillips, Taber «& Co., Importers and Wholesale Gro- 
cers, lOS and 110 California street, below Front, San Francisco. April 15. 

NOTICE. 

For the very best ptaotosrnpbs go to Bradley * Rnlofson's, 
in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aiiff 3, 1878. 



"The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[By a Trntkful Penman.] 

A Sunday or two ago a clergj'man was preaching at John St. Cha- 
pel, Lcmdon. "You always say," he observed, *'tliat Bennons are not 
practical. Because you have lost money in Turkish Stocks and other 
such rotten securities, you couinience your economies by cutting off your 
charities. But many of you still continxie to give dinner parties ; cut off 
one of these instead of one of your charities, and if you do this my ser- 
mon will have had a practical result." " Most indecently personal," ob- 
served a well-known careful nobleman to a friend, as he left the church 
with him. '* Hardly to you," replied the friend, " as yon never cave a 
dinner in your life. "^— The greatest attraction at the Paris Exhibition is 
the young and pretty English barmaids. The young people belong to most 
respectable families. Their parents have entered into a contract with the 
manager of the restaurant that he will return them safely to their homes. 
Every evening a huge break and i>air of liorses takes them off to their 
house at Batignolles. This house is only inhabited by them. No stranger 
is allowed admittance ; and they are guarded by two enormous dogs, that 
have received orders to tear in pieces any one who dares force his way 
into the sacred precincts. This has, so far, had the effect of producing 
only proposals of marriage. One of the young ladies, who is of Irish 
origin and very beautiful, has been painted by Charles Landelle, who 
wished to make a portrait of her, but was obliged first to" obtain the per- 
mission of her parents.— At the present moment it may be of interest 
to the public to know the precise manner in which Prince Bismarck is ac- 
customed to pass his time, or at any rate some part of it ; and we are en- 
abled to furnish the following details. Our correspondent writes : "He 
lives generally at the Kadzivil Palace, which has lately been purchased by 
the Gt^rman Government, and added to the old Foreign Office next door. 
At the back is a large garden, called here a "Park," and originally cut 
off from the Tier Garten, or Bois de Boulogne of Berlin. It is surrounded 
by high walls, and the great Chancellor, when be walks there, is care- 
fully watched over by the police, and protected by his now celebrated 
di>g, a large, smooth, black boar-hound, which has succeeded the famous 
" Sultan," who was poisoned. We do not know if any of his sons are 
possessed of any of bis intellectual powers; but they have inherited, at 
any rate, their father's vigorous and massive frame."— ^Some years ago, 
consequent on epidemic after epidemic of correspondence in the London 
Times, the wily hotel-keepers of England took crafty counsel together, 
and announced their intention thenceforth to charge " attendance" in the 
bill. This was hailed as a reform which exactly met the case. The re- 
sult, as we find it, and as we have little doubt most of our readers find 
it also, is simply this: that " attendance " has to be paid twice over — 
once in the bill and again to the attendants. The chamber-maid still 
hangs around your bedroom-door as you leave it for the last time ; the 
waiters still wash their hands in invisible soap-and-water as they stand in 
the doorway, while you are trying to make your escape; and "boots" 
still suggestively touches his forelock and mutters *' Boots, sir! " as he of- 
ficiously closes the doors of your hansom. It is all very well in theory to 
be stem and to ignore these demonstrations, only in this case it is wise 
never to go back to the same hotel. If you do, you will find that all ser- 
vice has to be extracted at the point of the bayonet.-^ The longer I live 
the more deeply is it impressed on me that when a lady and gentleman 
are riding together, the gentleman should be on the near, and not on the 
off, side of the lady. The considerations involved are not complicated. 
With the gentleman on the near side the lady runs the risk, if he be a 
bad rider, of an occasional jostle from man or horse ; and if the going is 
muddy, her habit gets splashed by the action of the gentleman's horse. 
On the other hand, her companion riding on the near side could protect 
her from far more likely, more frequent, and more disagreeable risks of 
being jostled, and his right hand would be free and bandy in case of her 
horse becoming awkward and requiring a stronger hand on the rein. There 
occurs one remark— that the near side is not so eligible as the off side for 
the efficient pursuit of that most seductive and dangerous amusement, 
spooning on horseback. — Atlas in tfic TToj-W.— ^The Shah of Persia has 
presented an immense photograph of himself to the ex-Qiieen Isabella, 
and also one to the Duchess de Magenta. He intends introducing pho- 
tography into his kingdom, as it is at present quite unknown there. His 
Majesty has spent, we are told, something over three millions of francs in 
Paris.' " The Court Circular says: The idea of having service at home 
on Sunday will commend itself to people who don't like stirring out early 
on Sunday morning. We hear that an ingenious gentleman at Halifax 
had a microphone recently placed in the pulpit of a chapel, and connected 
with the residence, a mile from the town, by means of a telej.ra.phic wire. 
The whole of the service was heard, except a few words, rendered indis- 
tinct by the preacher disturbing the microphone. We would suggest as 
an improvement on this idea, that first one preacher should be turned on 
and then another, which could easily be done by several microphones, and 
thus more variety would be secured than is ordinarily attainable in a 
single sermon.— —The following seems to be news almost too good to be 
true: The London Land A(jeiits' Record asserts that, in view of the recent 
accident to Sir Francis Goldsmid and similar casualties, the Railway Com- 
panies' Association, which directly represents the interests of the princi- 
pal railways of the country, have under consideration the adoption of a 
platform of a uniform hight, with continuous footboards to carriages to 
correspond. Such a concession as this, adds the Record, which would na- 
turally involve a large expenditure, would show conclusively that the rail- 
way authorities have sufKcient regard for the safety of their passengers. 
— ^Tbe story of Mr. Browning's poem, " La Saisiaz," has an interest for 
his readers. It is, as we have before said, an elegiac poem, in the Locks- 
ley Hall metre. The subject is the death of Miss Egerton Smith, one of 
the oldest and most intimate of Mr. Browning's friends ; a lady of wealth, 
culture and social quality, but who never entered society. A correspond- 
ent says that she always attended the Monday popular concerts in St. 
James's hall, London, leaning on Mr. Browning's arm — a tall, elderly 
lady, with refined face and gentle manner, whose one passion was for mu- 
sic. Last autumn Browning, with Miss Egerton Smith and another lady- 
were at a Swiss village, and bad appointed to climb the mountain at 
whose foot they were. On that morning his friend suddenly died. A few 
days after he ascends the mountain alone, and this poem is the record of 
the thoughts upon life and death which came to him in that solitude. Its 
result is expressed in the final line — that the poet " Believes in soul — 
ii very sure of God." 



INSURANCE. 



FIRC, I.IFE AND MARINE. 

INSURANCE AGENCYIiUTCHINSON & MANN, 

Ko. 314 California Sireet, San Francisco- 
Capital Represented $11,860,000, 

Girard Ins. Co Philadelphia, Pa. ] People's Ins. Co Newark, N. J. 



Revere Fire Ins. Co Boston. 

New Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans 

Uiiioii Ins. Co Galveston, Texas 

Trade Ins, Co Camden, N. J. 

[March 30.] 



St. PaulF. &M. Ins. Co... St. Paul, Minn. 

Home Ins. Co Columbus, Ohio 

La Caisse Geoerale Ins. Co . . Paris, France. 



AGGREGATE ASSETS, 338,789.0651 

Imperial Fire Insurance Company Of London. 

London Assarunce Corporation. Of Xjondon. 

Northern Assurance Company Of London. 

Uueen Insurance Company Of Liverpool. 

A. Joint Policy Issued by the JFo-ur Companies. 

W. I.ANE BOOKER A^eut aud Attoruey. 

ROBERT BICKSON Slauagrer. 

July 13. 317 California St. . San Francisco. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA. 

Priucipal Ofllce, 406 CRlifornla Street, Sau FrnociHCO. 
Cash Assets, January 1, 1S77, §£.95,291 ; Liabilities, so,952 ; Surplus for Policy 
Uulders, ^s9,339. J. F. Houghton, President; Geo. H. Howard, Vice-President; 
Charles R. Stor>', Secretary. K. H. MAGILL, H. H. EIGELOW, General Agents. 

Directors. — San Fiancisco — Geo. H. Howard, John H. Pvedington, J. F. Houghton 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Currey, L. L. baker, W. F. Whittier, C. C. Burr, E. 
M. Root, \V. H. White, J. L. N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood, George S. Mann, Cyrus 
Wilson, W. T. Garratt, C. Waterhouse. A. P. Hotaling, A. Block, A. K. P. Harmon, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Dodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch — V. D. Moody, Cliauncy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Far- 
relly, Joseph B. Marlin, W, B. Hardy, T. B. Simpson. San Diego— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento — Mijrk Hopkins, D. W, Earl, Julius Wetzlar, James Carolan. San Jose— 
T. Ellard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Pfister, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John Auzerais, John Balhach. Stockton— H. H. Hewlett, Chas. Buldint;, 
J. D. Peters, A, W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marysville- D. E. Knight. Grass 
Valley— Wm. Watt, T. \V. Sigoumey. Portland, Oregt.n— W. S. Ladd, O. H. Lewis, 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, D. Macleay. Vii^nia City, Nevada— John Gillig, I^aac 
L. Requa. March 17 . 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.-UNION INS. CO. OF S. F. 

The Califoruia Lloyds.— Established lu 1861. -»Nos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash capital 5750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed $1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECT(-)KS. 
—San Fra-nxisco — J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Moses 
Holler, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, Antoinc Borel, Charles Kohler, Joseph Seller, 
I. Lawrence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandcnsteiu, Charles £aum, James Moftitt, Ed- 
ward Cadwalader. Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Lu- 
ning, John Parrott, L. A. Booth, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Bartlett Doe, Gustave 
Touohard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. DuconLmun, Wm. Scholie, 
John Conlv, 1. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, J. O. Eldridge, A. B. Phipps, Jas. M. Ooewey. 
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KlTfLJC, Vice-President, 

CuARi.ES D. Haven, Secretarj'. Geo. T. Bohen, Surveyor. July 28. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 

FIKE ANI> MARINE. 

C^ash Assets, 9450,000.— Priuclpnl Office, 218 and SSO San- 
j some street, San Francisco. Officehs : — A. J. Bryant, President ; Richard 
IvERS, Vice-President; CnARLKs H. CusuiNO, Secretarj-; H. H. Watson, Marine 
Surveyor. Board ok Directors : — Peter Donahue, James Ir\ine, C. D. O'Sullivan, 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George O. 
McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Buckley, 
P. J. White, E. M. Root, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld, Daniel 
Callaghan. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Seale, Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 16. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFESINSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Has trausacted the business of I^lfe Insnrance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its asseta amount to overFoiRXEEN Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
Eany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. TMs company 
as comT*'>ed with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVEBSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 2t.'\ 328 Montgomery st reet. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, orZnrich, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, Capital 10,000,000 francs ; Buloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
tained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, our Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HENRY BALZER &. CO., Agents, 213 Sansome st., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Baironr, Ontbrle & C«., No. 

No. 18. 



C'tapital 85,000,000.— Agents: 
J 230 Oalifornia Btreet. San Franc isco. 

THE THAMES AND IKERSEYJVIARINE INS. CO., LIMITED. 

£. N. HOOPER, Agent. 
June. 1. 1 Office : 302 California Sireet. 

MORRIS SPEYER. 

Ire and Marine Insurance A^eut, 307 California street. 

Dwelling, 507 Post street. January- 1, 1S7S. Jan. 12. 



F 



CHARLES LE GAY, 

American Conimlsslu» Merchant, ■ ■ I Kne Scribe, Pi.rts. 



Aug. 3, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



9 



A BALLAD. 

[all RItlllTS HESERVBD.] 

Beaidit the niiueil, Htniw-tlmtched 8ty» 

Fra^^Taut with weiiltli of wolcomo waah, 
We (HMuU'rwd. darling', y<>« ftiul I, 

Ami talkeil, of course, the lisual b^wh. 
There, nninJ their motht-r in the sun, 

Her litter luy-tl«ar little dots! 
One hrown, one yellow, aiul one ilun ; 

While two were white, with inky simts. 
You held your nose, and with a "Phew!" 

You Iwiile me cease my merry riija: 
"Stay still a little whilel " said you, 
"Or we shall scare the little pigs." 
But all these little pi'pi arose, 

And sought the troujjh with rampant rush ; 
ITiere each in turn imuitrsed its nose. 

Then sank to sleep amidst the slush. 
You held my nose, besides your own — 

My darliui;, oh! 'twas gently done! 
Yet had I spoken then my tone 

Would p'rhaps have but provoked your fun. 
So I was silent; and the snore 

Of mother pig came ou the breeze, 
And torture terrible I bnre, 

For I'd have given the world to sneeze. 
But, darling, you were blind to this. 

And stood there like the worst of priga ; 
You didn't even take a kiss 
' For fear you'd scare the little pigs. 

Now once again I seek the sty 

Where my young heart and hopes you crushed — 
A swilling sound, a grunting cry, 

The little pigs to feed have rushed! 
In heedless haste each pigling goes, 

And puts its feet in now, I wis, 
As on that day you held my nose, 

And yet my lips tried not lo kiss. 
The little pigs keep feeding still — 

It's marvelous what they can eat — 
Until the downy daffodil 

Nods sleepily about my feet ; 
Until the daisy shuts its eye. 

And all the blue-bells go to bed — 
j The way pigs stuiF, when in a sty. 

Is marvelous, as I have said! 
Ajid what think I, as I stand there, 

And on the paling lean and look? 
What is the meaninff of the stare 

I Hx upon each tiny "chook?" 
Do I recall the days gone by, 

The hours I never can forget? 
And do the memories of this sty 

With bitter tears my blue eyes wet? 
Nay! surely not, for 'tis a treat 

To watch these tender porklings swill ; 
For well I know the more they eat 

The sooner they'll be fit to kilL 
Soft sentiment has had its day 

Since I stood here alone with you. 
And wondered in my girlish way 

Whatever 'twas you meant to do. 
Now, if enjoyment keen I show, 

And dash off into joyous jigs, ■— 
It is because full well I know 

We soon shall roast these little pigs! 

— ''Paneful Violet," in Truth, 

Editor News Letter—SiE: The letter from Peru which appeared in 
your last week's number, has recalled to my memory some rather curious 
incidents connected with the "Church," which I have met with during 
my residence in South America. It may not be generally known that 
ttiere is a sort of " Celestial Exchange " going on between this continent 
find the Old World. The usual price for a " mass " in South America be- 
iiiL,' a dollar, the priests find it a profitable business to remit the number 
tu Italy, where they are said from 15c. to 2oc., according to rates of ex- 
chan^'e. I have ou several occasions seen the superior remitting money 
for this purpose, though I have often doubted if all the masses paid for 
were said. The efficacy is, of course, equal, from whatever point of this 
terrestrial sphere they start from. A devout Christian lately got the bet- 
ter of a certain community of monks by ordering ten masses for the soul 
of his father, for which he paid with a SlOO bill, getting $90 change from 
the "Padres," who only discovered, when too late, that the bill was 
fur^'ed. 

There is also a yearly traffic in " papal bulls," or permits to the faithful 
to eat flesh meat during "Lent," which cost from a quarter of a dollar 
upward. The sin of a rich man being greater, the right to sell these "in- 
dulgences " is usually "farmed out" to the highest bidder; and, some 
years ago, a lot of forged permits to commit this mortal sin having been 
thrown on the market in a certain district, the owner of the privilege for 
that year advertised in the papers to the faithful to beware of "spurious 
" imitations," which would bring peril to their souls. 

During last " holy week," some profaue young men introduced surrep- 
titiously a solution of nitrate of silver into the holy water font of a well- 
known church. The consequence was a series of miracles, many persons 
being "sealed " in the forehead with an indelible sign of the cross. 

I cannot conclude without letting you know of a ludicrous incident, 
which happened some time ago in a country chapel. It happened that, 
just before the service, the "Cura" was enjoying himself ^vith a few 
choice friends at a quiet game of cards, and, being suddenly called by the 



"sacristan " before tho game was played out, he retained some of the 
ivury counters in his pocket. After tho service he administered the sac- 
rament to certain of the conKre>,'ation, aminig othei'w to two old peowantH. 
Otu' of these old men was tibsurved to be chewing and making vain at- 
tempts to swallow the conaecrateil wafer given him by the priest. At ln«t, 
losing' patience, he broke out somewhat like this: "Say, friend, what waM 
that the priest -^ave us?" "That." replied the other, " was the flesh ami 
blood of Jesus Christ." " Now 1 understand," cried the first, " he gave 
you the flesh and blood and me the bone! "at the same time producing 
one of the ivory counters which hud slipped by Jtccident into the hand 
of the prieat into his mouth. Yours, etc., 

Anothse Occasional, Cobbespondent. 
Snn Fmnchco, Jitli/;\0th. 1878. 

COURSE OF THE AVERAUE PRICE OF WHEAT 

From January, 1878* vith tlie Corresponding Prices in the 
Previous Year. 



■IIHRaSIIII 
IHIini 

iiiinii 

minii 




J/\N^.. FEBxImaRCH APRIL ■ MAY JUNE 



69 
6S 
67 
66 
65 
64 
63 
62 
61 
60 
59 
53 
51 
56 
55 
54 
53 
52 
51 
50 
49 
48 
47 
46 
45 

The thick curve shows the price in each week of 1878 ; the thin curve 
the prices of the corresponding weeks in 1877. Each vertical column 
represents one week, and each horizontal line shows one shilling per quar- 
ter. The figures at the side are the prices in shillings per quarter. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE. 

TliiTteenflt Industrial Exhiliition, San Franoisoo, Cal<, 187S> 

Tbe Mauagrers liave the honor to announce to the Public 
that the THIRTEKNTH GRAND EXHIBITION OF SCIENCE, ART AND IN- 
DUSTllY, g:iven under the auspices of the Mechanics' Institute, will open at tlie Pa- 
vilion, on Market, Eighth and Mission streets, on Tuesilay, Aug'ust l.?th. 

Great and unusual attractions will be presented to viaitors. Mining-, Ag^ricultural 
and other Machinery will be in motion. Pacific Coast Manufactures, Minerals and 
Products of the Soil wiUbe fully represented, beside many new and interesting nov- 
elties never before exhibited on this Coast. 

The Art l>C3>artntent will be under the supervision of ihe San Franciseo Art 
Association, a guarantee for excellence and completeness. Local Art will be specially 
represented, as also works of noted foreign artists, selected from the private galleries 
of this city. 

The Horticultural Garilen, so popular heretofore, will be made still more 
attractive this year l)y the addition of many new features. 

The Music— Each afternoon and evening a first-class Instrumental Concert will 
be given by the best soloists and accomplished musicians of this city, with a daily 
change of programme of the best and most popular music. 

No e.Kpense or pains will be spared by the Management that will add to the com- 
fort or convenience of visitors. 

Applications for space or information can be obtained from the Secretary, at the 
office, 27 Post street. IRVING M. SCOTT, President. 

J. H, Culver, Secretary. [July 20.] J. H. GILMORE, Superintendent. 

THE AVERILL MIXED PAINT 

IS maiiufactnreii from sErictly pure AVhite I^ead, Ziuc, aud 
Pure Linseed Oil, to which is added Water Glass, which chemically unites the 
ingredients and holds them in solution, so they cannot separate. As a house paint 
it has no equal, producing a brilliant glossy finish, impervious to the weather, and 

Will Last Twice as Ijohs 
as any other paint made. It is of pure white, and any Shade or Color desired, mixed 
ready for the brush, so that any one can apply il. 

Our wagon and machinery paints, from the more common colors to the finest ver- 
milion, are specially desirable. 

Our fire-proof roof, barn and bridge paint, manufactured from o.^ade of iron, is the 
best and cheapest paint for the purpose that can be produced. 

Put up in 1, J, 1 and 5 gallon cans, and in barrels, sold by the gallon. Send for 
sample card of colors and price list. Address, 

CAI.IFOKNIA PAIBTT COMPAXT, 
July 13. 329 MARKET STREET, San Francisco. 

CUNNINSHAM, CURtIsS & WELCH, 

Successors to John €r. Hotlg-e & Co., Stationers, Booksellers 
and Importers, Blank Book Manufacturers and Commercial Printers, 327, 329 
and 331 SANSOME STREET. Special attention given to the Stationery Wants of 
Banks, Insurance OfiBces, etc., and estimates promptly furnished upon request. 
[April 20.] 



1 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Auff. 3, 1878. 



CUSTOM HOUSE PECUUtARITIES. 
There are miUiona in it We luean iu the Custom House. That 
vast money shop makes a showing of collecting over seven millions of 
dollars per annum. That is verily a tempting amount of twenty dollar 
pieces to pass through the hands of officials who but the other day were 
taken off the streets almost paupers. That any of those twentv dollar 
pieces have stuck to greasy palms we do not assert. That is a matter that 
revenue agents are supposed to tell us, but they don't. They seldom do. 
They didn't tell of those gigantic St. Louis whisky frauds, although they 
had become so immense that a commercial reporter for a newspaper was 
able to figure them out, and detect the smndles. We are satisfied, from 
indications that all point one way, that t^ur Custom House is as crooked 
as a ram's horn, ana that is the crookedest thing we know of, e.xcept our 
Custom House. We don't aay that Collector Shannon sees how crooked 
it really is. Of course we don't. But we do say that he went into it a 
poor man, and in an incredibly short time is reputed to be a comparatively 
rich one. It is said that he was lucky in stocks, whilst everybody else 
was unfortunate. Perhai)s he was. Yet we confess to some curiosity to 
see his broker's account, merely to gain a wrinkle as to how the thing was 
done. It would be worth learning how, whilst other men lost fortunes on 
California street, this man made one. We ai'e not believers in the 
"points" about stocks that are so current. But a point from Shannon's 
stock account would be a point indeed. Come, Tom, give us— only us, 
you know — the tip ! How did you do it? Of com-se we won't tell any- 
body. Seriously, there is a curiosity in the public mind on this subject 
that will not down. When a v:igrant has no visible means of support, the 
public insist upin knowing by what means he lives. In like manner, 
when a public official is found in pos.session of wealth out of all proportion 
to his known means of accumulating money, public opinion is disquieted, 
and feels, very naturally, curious upon the subject. There is no tlenying 
that. It is a common inquiry on the streets, ''How did Tom Shannon 
make bis money?" If he were not a collector of public funds such an in- 
quiry would be an impertinence. But when it is asked in regard to a man 
through whose hands seven millions of public money pass annually, then 
the question is an exceedingly pertinent one, and worthy of a clear 
and convincing answer. Tom could give such an answer, we know. 
A little difficulty of that kind would be nothing to Lis genius. 
Yet the bottom facts would he interesting-. Perhaps if Tom would help us 
we may help Tom. We shall see. To arrive at the bedrock requires a good 
deal of delving. Yet if one keeps on delving one at last reaches the desired 
point. We have tried it and know, Tom didn't make any money on that 
Jamesioion smuggling case, we know. Yet he did make a suggestion in 
that case, which, to say the least, was singular. There would be much 
money in such a suggestion applied to other cases. That is to say, there 
would if the suggestion were made by a less honest man than Tom Shan- 
non. When the attempted smuggling of the Jamestown^s spirits and 
cigars was detected, he suggested, with a readiness that would have done 
credit to an expert in the art of crookedness, " enter them as ship's stores 
per City of New York." That suggeptitm was not reassuring when coming 
from a collector of vast sums of public money. On the contrai-y, it was 
diquieting in the highest degree. We could wish that in the public inter- 
ests the author of such a suggestion were administering a less elastic sj's- 
tem than is our abominable ad valorem duties, which have been discarded 
aa demoralizing by intelligent governments. We levy but few duties 
upon the weight, measure or number of articles. We have most stupidly 
determined to tax things according to their supposed money value. But 
as opinions differ as to the value of almost everything, there is a wide 
field for fraud in the appraisement of dutiable goods. So wide and so 
tempting is that field that other governments have found it impossible to 
prevent frauds under the system, and have long since abandoned the at- 
tempt as impracticable, ana have devised other and more sensible meth- 
ods of levying duties. It has remained for the American tariff to be 
based upon an erroneous and frightfully tempting system. Under it du- 
ties are levied ranging from 10 to 150 per cent., the averege being about 
60 per cent. Fancy what a margin there is for fraud in a slight underval- 
uation of the vast amounts of goods that enter this port! As we have 
said, " there are millions in it." There is rottenness in the Appraiser's 
department, we know. There are importers in this city who pay officers 
large sums annually, and enter such sums in their profit-and-loss account. 
Why do they submit to such losses ? Is not the assumption a fair one 
that they receive a quid pro quo in the undervaluation of their imports ? 
We make no charge against particular individuals, but we would like to 
know from officers Wheeler and McNabb whether they appear in the 
books of any firms in this city as having received large sums which have 
been entered to profit and loss? When this question ia answered satis- 
factorily we shall have something more to say. 

WUiTUiJR ARE "WE DRIFTING? 

Such occasionallydecrepidoldfoggy journals as tbe^^^a are in the 

hab t of sneering at the monarchies ^d empires of the world, their way of 
doing things and managing their own affairs. Comparatively trivial mat- 
ters — whicharenoearthly business of theirs — such as the allowance voted by 
Parliament to an English prince on the occasion of his inarriage, or the 
reception of Beaconsfield on his return from Berlin, are made the subject 
of editorials and phillipics, teeming with garrulous senility. While Rome 
is ablaze, these precious newspapers are fiddling. By Home, in this in- 
stance, we mean our much-vaunted Republic. It is ablaze. Capital and 
labor are in conflict ; justice is dormant ; crime is rampant. The highest 
office in the Government is held by a fraudulent tenure. Our ballot- 
boxes are stuffed, men in the highest positions are every day recreant in 
their trust, savings banks are swindles by the scores, robbery, rapine and 
rapacity stalk through the land. Thousands who, until recently, were 
well endowed with the world's goods, are now in indigence a'ld wa' i. 
Pro patria was the cry of the Roman Republic — pro nobis is ours. For 
Heaven's sake, let us look at the terrible beam in our o\vn eye before we 
seek for the mote in our neighbor' .s. The Irish and the devil have hold of 
us. As against them both, we are Know-nothings. The time has come — 
fully come — when all our good men and true should be aroused to the 
dangerof the country, else it will come to be written of it that this great Re- 
public is a failure. The first need of the times is statesmen who are patriots: 
the next, patriots who are statesmen. Of such, in both senses, is Senator 
John P. Jones. Let Nevada take heed to it that she re-elect him to the 
position he has Rf^ nobly and ably filled for the past six years. We have 
jjlenty more such men among us, men in whose keeping the nation's des- 
tiny would be seciire from the evils which threaten it. Let us seek them 
out, and rid us of the political tricksters that curse us with their rule. 
Then,, indeed, we may be, as of old, a pros|jerous and a happy people. 



POOR LO ! 

The hills echo loudly the whoop of the savage: 

Ah! the border well knows what is meant by that cry. 
He rides from his stronghold to plunder and ravage, 

And cruel is the glance of his black eagle-eye. 
Like a hawk he swoops down on the farm and the village; 

The cup of bis anger is filled to the brim, 
And his gaze glows with hate on the husbandman's tilli^e 

That's stealing the desert his fathers left him. 
Ah ! woe for the man now unarmed to receive him ! 

Ah, woe for the woman that crosses his path ! 
For the demon that sits in his breast will not leave him 

'Till the blood of a pale-face has blunted his wrath. 
A *' devil incarnate," of course we must call him 

Who hew down his forests and squat on his land; 
He's only a '• red-skin," so nothing- should gall him; 

^yhy he should inherit we cant understand. 
So rub him and hunt him, and kill and malign him; 

His race cannot last, and the sooner its run 
The better, for when to his grave we resign him 

The race of the " Agent " will also be done. 

THE REAL ESTATE MARKET. 

Dull tixnea have laid a heavy impress on real estate. Until recently, 
improved city property could generally command fair prices and a ready 
sale, but now even the beat of such property is difficult to dispose of at 
rates greatly reduced from those obtainable a year ago. As to outside 
property, it is duller than ever. Some of it can .scarcely be given away. 
Homestead association lot^, whose name is legion, in the vicinity of South 
San Francisco, the Bernal Hights and the Old County Road, as far as the 
San Mateo County line, are, in numerous instances, quite unsalable. 
When, at long and rare intervals, any sales of them are effected, the 
prices realized are generally about one-half of what was paid for them in 
the great excitement of 18G9. This is allowing nothing for taxes and in- 
terest on the principal originally invested. Adding these, the prices now 
realizable are less than one-fourth of the original cost, and thi^, too, ap- 
plies only to lots within comparatively easy access and of good locatinn. 
The more remote lots— as, for example, toward San Miguel and School- 
House Station — are unsalable. So many of our citizens among the labor- 
ing classes have invested in such property, and have for these many years 
been holding on to it, in the hope of a revival in values — which seems as 
far as ever from being realized — that this long and weary depression is of 
that character which maketh the heartsick. It is hard indeed to find 
that these — the investments of frugality and care — which, when made, 
bad seemingly nothing haphazardous or even uncertain about them, should 
at this late hour of the day have scarcely any market value. The future 
will, of course, do much for them — but when ? Under this- class of pro- 
perty we note the record of two sales during the past week; that of lot 19 
in Block 642, Point Lobos Avenue Homestead, for S3oD. and of lots 1 and 
2 in Block 35, Excelsior Homestead, for S600. The first of these cost 
about S650 seven years ago, and the last, with premiums for choice, cost 
SI, .516.25 about the same time. Both properties were paid for on the in- 
stallment plan. 

In the Mission and Western Addition, lots are, also, unless in very choice 
localities, very dull of sale at low figures. The following are among the 
bona fide sales in these directions recorded last week: Irregularly shaped 
lot on northwesterly corner of Mission and 22d streets, having a large 
building and store erected on it, 820,000 ; lot on westerly line of Bryant 
street, commencing 140 feet south from 25th street, thence south 47-^x100 
feet (nearly opposite the City and County Ho.spital), §5,254 ; lot on north- 
erly line of Hill street, 190 feet west from Valencia street, thence west- 
erly 30x114 feet (with a house on it built by the Real Estate Associates, 
the whole paid for on the installment plan), S4.058 ; lot on north-westerly 
corner of Sacramento and Scott streets, north 27 8:^-12x81 3-12 feet, 84,000, 
resold by the grantee for S4,200. (This lot, on which is a two-story house 
and grocery, sold at its full value.) Two other lots, one on the north- 
easterly comer of Eddy and Laguna streets, E 46x120 feet, S7,100 ; and 
north line Eddy, commencing 112i feet east from Laguna street, E 25x120 
feet, S3,125— both vacant lots — brought good prices. A lot on the north- 
erly line of 22d street (with a new house on it), commencing 90 feet east 
from Valencia street, and running thence easterly 35x00 feet, which sold 
now for S4,000, was purchased by the present vendor on October 31st, 
1877, for S4,200 ; and since that time several street assessments and the 
taxes for 1877-78 have been paid on it, the whole showing a heavy debit 
to the last vendor's profit and loss account. Conveyances aggregating 
§10,950 in expressed consideration values, constitute a part of the past 
week's records, but they are not sales but simply transfers in arranging 
the settlement of the estate of a deceased merchant. If a good title is 
conveyed, and the actual consideration value expressed, one remarkably 
pro6table transaction is of record as having been effected on July 28th. 
It is the sale for §9,000 of a lot on the northerly line of Clay street, com- 
mencing 175 feet westerly from Polk street, and thence running westerly 
50 feet by 127 8.^-12 feet in depth. On July 10th, less than three weeks 
before this transfer, the same property was purchased at auction by the 
last grantor from Maurice l>ore & Co., under a suit in foreclosure, for 
S6,10O. A clear profit of §2,900 in eighteen days, on an investment of 
about twice that sum, is a good stroke of business for somebody, but the 
unfortunate individual sold out has been undoubtedly victimized to the 
hard times. 

DISTDSfGtJISHED ARRIVAL. 

The Hon. Jeremiah Black arrived in this city, overland from Wash- 
ington, on last Monday evening. His name was not announced in the 
list of expected arrivals, and his presence here was not anticipated, and is 
not now generally known. The Bar Association of San Francisco, how- 
ever, git an inkling of his arrival as early as Tuesday, and the curiosity 
of the fraternity to see one of its most shining lights, and the wish to 
greet him and do him honor, increased the attendance of its members at 
the hour when they most do congregate. Judge Black's name, decisions 
and opinions in matters legal have had great weight for many years, nr)t 
only in the Supreme Courts of the United States, but also throughout 
the land. We find his name associated as counsel in all the prominent 
questions that have arisen regarding the Sutro Tunnel, and he Wiis an 
early and ardent friend of that enterprise, as well as of the mining inter- 
ests of this coast. 



Aug. 3, 1878. 



OALIFOUNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

**HMr tb« Ori«r:" " Wh«t the d»¥»l «rt thooT' 
"Una Ibftt w)ll play tbo devil, air. with yoD." 

" He'd a stiiifr in bis l.-iil bh long u a flati. 
Which made him icruw buldvr and bolder." 



** la anybody being mardered here ?" inquired a -^(.'ntleman numed 
MeXift.T, Htickiii^' his lieml into thf room of -Mrs. Pliff, at Mulliynu's 
boardinj^bouse, one I'veuiuif hist week. Mrs. PlilT w.os the star boarder, 
having beeu Hbruad Itutt Siuutuer, and keeping a piano, upon which for 
both reasons ahe wtts i>er{>etratiug what she called a " bai-kerroU'' when 
the intrusion occurred. " S-i-r-r?" sai*l Mrs. P., loftily. '* I say, are 
you running a menagerie in here — haven't the beasts been fed, or what's 
the racket?" bitterly continuevl the imi>orturbable Mr. McN., who occu- 
pied the room overhead, and who had made up his mind to stop that eter- 
nuJ caterwauling, or die in the attempt. " Wretch !" snorted Mrs. Pliff, 
and ju«t ad the intruder was about to continue his reflections, Mr. PlifF, 
who was in the room, suddenly linrled his weight against the door, whit^h 
resulted in Mr. McN. being caught by the ueck between it and the 
jamh, hia eyes and tongue starting out of his mouth during the operation, 
a circumstance the insulted soprano took advantage of by hammering the 
prisoner over the head with her husband's bootjack. All this was put iu 
evidence before Judge Louderb;u;k tlie next morning, who at unce dis- 
missed the charge of assault and battery, and told Mr. McNeeter that 
it served him right for not being able to appreciate classical music. 
•' That's all very well," grumbled the battered complainant, but she had 
snng one other song twenty-eight times the same evening, before that." 
'* Ah ! 34>mething from Wagner, I suppose," said his Honor, smiling 
blantUy at the fair culprit. '* Wagner nothing," rejoined McN., with 
deep disgust, it was 'Baby Mine.'" "Bless my soul," gasped the 
Juoge, >vith ft look of horror and genuine sympathy, "why didn't you 
say so at first, my poor man. Here, clerk, commit this wojnan for six 
iDimths, for inciting a riot, and her husband for three months, for aiding 
and abetting. If there should be a second offense, remind me to make it 
ten years. This ' Baby Mine' business has got to be stamped out by the 
big foot of the law, or I'll know the reason why !" 

Every earnest, devoted student of natural history knows the fond- 
ness goats have for hats. The ordinary goat of commerce will leave a 
bushel of oats, or the basket of an unwary vegetable peddler, to devour 
on old hat. especiaDy when the jjeddler himself suggests the transfer with 
a brick. A short time ago a hop was given at what is called for the sake 
of the argument, " the hotel," at Santa Cruz. Three or four unhung uu- 
iaances, cidled brokers, incited by the idea of doing something fm^ny and 
a numbor of Santa Cruz sours, secured a goat that was peacefully eating 
oyster shells on the beach, and hoisted it through the window of the gen- 
tlemen's dressing-room. By the time " Home, sweet home " was played, 
the industrious animal had stowed away seventy-two hats, and was pre- 
paring to wash down the meal with a light overcoat. An eyewntness says 
that the scene during the unpacking of that goat was the most thrilling 
thing he had ever witnessed. It beat the battle of Plevna all to Botbing. 
Twenty-three young men held the go.at r<uuid the body, six others took 
turns iu sprinkling snuff on its nose and catching the missing articles as 
it sneezed them up, while the barkeeper hammered on the goat's ether 
end with a bungstarter and generally helped matters along. Why — why 
is it that artists will fumble round the Yosemite and paint the same tire- 
some old views of mortgaged ranches, when live, fresh, glowing subjects 
like these find a p lace nowhere but in the memory — false, fleeting, um-eliable 
memory! 

There is an old sinner living in this city whom we propose exposing. 
He deserves it. There is a young lady pupil at the Art bchool to whom he 
is very attentive, and whom he was constantly begging to visit his library. 
Knowing her to be an enthusiast about painting, he Hnally promised, if 
she complied with his request, to show her a genuine painting by Albert 
Durer. It was nothing but the picture of a small cheese, said he, but the 
most perfectly natural thing in the world, worth a fortune— a genuine 
Durer. She assented, and when the time came the base deceiver moved a 
cloth and exhibited asmall cracked canvas, in which a round hole had betn 
cut. "Where is the cheese?" said she. "Great heavens !" he exclaimed, with 
apparent amazement, "I see how it is. That cheese was so perfectly 
natural that the mice have eaten it !" A man with a gall like that will 
find his way to Congress or San Quentin — one of. these days, mark our 
words. 

Has tlie right hand of the San Franciscaa lost its cunning? Is the 
Caucasian played out ? Last Monday one of that numerous and influen- 
tial class of this community known as thieves got himself purpopely 
locked into a clothing store, and after carefully selecting what plunder he 
required, found himself unable to get out again. In this extraordinary 
and mortifjdng dilemma he was discovered the next morning, and con- 
ducted to prison. Now, what we suggest is — but, of com^se, the reader 
has guessed it before we have it half out — that the Board of Supervisors' 
meetings be held in that particular store for a short time — say, just long 
enough to get the streets cleaned, for instance. 

Prom Chicago comes a welcome little story of how a young female 
was instantly changed from blonde to brunette by a stroke of lightning. 
The fact that out of every ten women one meets on Kearny street the 
hair of nine of them has been carefully soaked, smeared and pasted, from 
whatever color it pleased a doubtless well-meaning but badly advised 
Providence bo originally make it, to a bilious yellow, is another and a ter- 
ribly convincing illustration of the disadvantage of our eternal Summer 
weather. Bids for supplying a first-class thunder storm and fixings for 
this vicinity, without delay, will be received at this office. 

A gentleman in reduced circumstances has been advertising a caul for 
sale. He guarantees it as having originated with the seventh daughter of 
a seventh son, and states that no reasonable offer wdll be refused. We 
have tried every way we could think of to brighten up these hard times, 
except purchasing a caul. If thecaulownerwill take an oldgas stove inpart 
payment, and the rest out in advertising, we don't mind making a 
trade. As the gentleman seems also to have a first-class, extra-sized gall 
we will take that, too. 

Revenge is one of the most ignoble of passions, and yet to the shame 
of human natui'e be it said that the play most popular at this moment in 
London, is one in which a milkman gets thrown out of the window in 
four acts, and is lynched by the entire company in the last one. 



It la probably nut so much their fault as their misfortune that the 
Chinese all hiok as much alike as peas in a pod. The other day, as the 
Chinese Ambassador, unaccouipivnied Viv his suite, was walking down 
Market street and wondering wliy the 'ifelican girls put veils over their 
faces after taking so much trouble to paint them, ho was halted by a fat. 
red-faced woman, with a bii; green sunshade, who fiercely demanded to know 
if he intended to bring back that fluted petticoat. " What?" gasped the 
oriental dignitary, who sjioaks tiilerable English. " Now don't lie, Wan 
Choo," continued the woman at the top of her voice ; " I say nothing 
about two nairs of .socks and a pillow-case, but that petticoat I must 
have or I'll nreak every bone in your body! What! you'll skip off, will 
you?" and with a dexterous bat of her parasol she knocked bis coil loose, 
and, seizing the end of his queue^the balance of which was immediately 
manned by all the boys iu the vicinity — she started off toward the City 
Hall. Fortunately, by the time the shrieking Ambassmlor had been 
pulled along like a fire engine about half a square, the procession ran into 
some of his white a tUiches, who soon released him. Even then his captor 
added insult to injury by offering him a two-bit piece as indemnification. 
The Ambassador may now and henceforward be distinguished by a chalk 
mark on the nose. 

We trusted and believed that the lofty dignity, to say nothing of 
the crushing cynicism that lingers about this chaste family journal, wtuild 
forever have saved us from that barnacle of ordinary periodicals, the 
enigma fiend. A yi>ung lady at Contra Costa- a locality which doubt- 
less produces such things in profusion- -sends us an enigma and two rebuses. 
Our young but misguided fx-iend's name is Oleonette, and she goes on to 
inform us that her first is an animal that eats grass, that her second is a 
German statesman, and her whole is something cats fear. We are glad of 
it. If there is really anything cats are afraid of we will order a dozen for our 
back shed at once. Notwithstanding all this, we cannot publish Cleonette's 
productions. They have a certain sinewy strength and wild poetic grace 
all their own, but we cannot publish them. She says that she thinks after a 
while she can " do better." She can do much better now by sending them 
to the Post, where they keep an inexpensive idiot chained up especially to 
edit that sort of thing. Milk for babies always on tap. 

The gas suddenly went out at a San Jose concert the other evening, 
and when it was re-lit a young lady indignantly accused a happy looking 
man, who sat on the next bencli, of kissing her in the darkness. The 
man tried to explain, but some of the lady's friends seized and proceeded 
to fire him out with expedition. As they reached the door, the victim 
managed to gasp out. "Me kiss a woman! — why, I'm just divorced." 
That settled it. He was apologized to, and the man of experience 
proudly resumed his seat. 

During the recent sanitary inspection of Chinatown complaint was 
made to the Visiting Committee of a house in the midst of a cn)wded lo- 
cality, and from which proceeded a most horrible effluvia. The premises 
in question seemed to be closed and uninhabited, but the stench emitted 
from one of the rooms was rapidly breeding an epidemic; and directions 
were given to break down the door. On the floor within was found a copy 
of the Chronicle, that had evidently been there some weeks. It was taken 
out and buried. 

They say that when a Chinaman accumulates five hundred dollars he 
is a ricn man, goes back to China, and lives a life of pampered luxury. 
If he should happen to amass a full thousand, however, he is considered a 
bloated capitalist, talks to his neighbors of what fun he had over here 
going on sprees with his friends Stanford and Flood, and, when he dies, 
overpowers bis native town with the bequest of a dollar and a half to 
found a library. 

How soon we forget the familiar things of childhood. The other day. 
a veritable old-fashioned hair trunk was landed from one of the Pacific 
Mail steamers, and, as it lay on the wharf all day, the employees and 
passengers walked round it on tip-toe, under the impression that it was 
some new kind of animal for Woodward's Gardensr, which was liable to 
bite somebody if it woke up. 

Another man has enlisted in the U. S. Army, which makes 28 pri- 
vates in all. This took place at St. Louis last week, and he was immedi- 
ately shipped to General Howard, in the charge of a poLceman, for fear 
he should get lost on the way. He was escorted to the depot by three 
militia brass bands, and was greeted along the route with the wildest en- 
thusiasm. 

V^hen the late poet Bryant was under sevehteeja, he had written 
a treatise on atmospheric animalculEe. How many of the young men in 
our midst, under seventeen, have written treatises on -atmospheric 
aniraalculag ? We dare swear not one in ten. No, they would rather 
play base ball and hookey, and let the poor animalculse go to blazes. This 
18 not as it should be. 

"My dear sir," warmly exclaimed St. Peter, as Dr. Ayer, the pill 
man, passed through the other day, "lam delighted to see you; pass 
right in. I really don't see how we could get along without your in- 
valuable pills. No purgatory should be without them !" 

Next to being bom in a house of prostitution, and chased out of 
town at the muzzle of an ex-Governor's pistol, we know of nothing calcu- 
lated to qualify a man for editing a San Francisco daily better than being 
convicted of robbing a LTnited States safe. 

President Hayes has written Beaconsfield a private note, offering him 
a good place in the State Department if he should be out of a situation 
this Summer. This is jiretty liberal for Hayes, as Beaconsfield is not an 
Ohio man, we understand. 

Mr. ■^Wellock informed the Board of Supervisors that he supposed 
they were "the servants of the public." This Wellock has been a first- 
class humorist all this time without anybody suspecting it. 

The gentleman who inscribes visiting cards at the Occidental Hotel 
announces himself, with considerable truth, as "Abetter writer than 
Charles Dickens ever dare be." 

Supervisor Smith is said by a reporter to have a " lonesome expres- 
sion." Most honest men would have in the company he is forced to keep 
during Board meetings. 

One vray to wipe out the Bannocks would be to invite them to a 
friendly game of football at Harvard or Yale College. 

One good "way to keep fish fresh is to go to sleep and. not feel 'em 
when they bite. 

The Schenck family goes in for a triple standard. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER ATv^D 



Aug. 3, 1878. 



TO-MORRO^W. 

"To-morrow!" wept the watcher, as she knew 
That death had claimed her dearest as his due : 
"O bitter waking! the joyless day! 
"To-morrow!" murmured he, with dying breath. 
Viewing the timeless Hfe that starts from Death. 
"Only to-morrow, and we meet for aye!" 
— Spectator. 

TYPICAL COMMUNISTa 
Iiieut-Gov, Dorsheixuer has gone to Europe. 
He is a comparatively young man, full of enthu- 
siam, and has popular qualities which give him a 
strong hold on the people. He was a republican 
of the war variety, but is a thorough democrat in 
feeling. The other day he went to Justus 
Schwab's lager-beer tunnel and had quite a talk 
with that distinguished leader of the communists 
as to his aims and ideas and plans. Of course 
Schwab was diplomatic and gracious. He felt 
the compliment, and was truly grateful for the 
honor done him. But when he came to reduce 
his inflated rhetoric and swollen aspirations to 
their lowest terms, it was found that be had 
nothing in particular left as capital to do politi- 
cal business on. Schwab is a character. He is 
an incarnate gesticulation. He talks all over, 
ever}' part of him jinning in the expression of 
what he has to say. He is an enthusiast full of 
crude ideas in a state of fermentation, and the 
effervescence of his crotchets and whims is de- 
cidedly interesting. He i^ one of the men fitted 
by nature to generate feeling in other men. He 
tells them what they think. He voices their 
feelings. He amplifies their discontents. They 
look on him as being half-inspired, and while 
they know he is ugly, they ima^ne that he is 
great. As near as I can make out, there are 
about 300 Schwabites. John Swinton goes 
among them occasionally and serves as pyrotech- 
nics for the company. They don't know what he 
says, but his talk fills the whole heavens with 
shooting-stars and spangles, and images, many- 
colored, grand and grotesque. — Spriiir/Jidd Re- 
publican. 

These men are all very well in their way, but 
our Dennis will undoubtedly eclipse even the 
glowing stupidity of the gorgeous East, unless he 
is speedily introduced to Jack Ketch. 




(^ominencliijjr Sunilay, July 14th, 1S78, 
J Passenger Trains will leave San Francisco, from 
Passenger Depot on Townsend street, between Third 
and Fourth streets, as follows : 



8 0rj A.M. daily for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, Tres 
,^\J Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all Way 
Stations. ^^ At Pajabo. the Santa Cruz R. E. con- 
nects with this train for Aptos and Santa Cruz. 
^^ At Salinas the M. & S. V. R. R. connects with 
this train for Monterey, g^^f" Staqe connections made 
with this train. j^° PAnLORCAti attached to this train. 



1 C) ^O ^■"' '*^''^' ^^^ ^^"^ "^^^^ ^""^ ^^^ Stations. 

Q QO PM. daily (Sundays excepted) for Gilroy, Pa- 
*J,^J\J jaro, Hollister, Tres Pines and Way Stations. 

g^ Stage Connection made with this train at Sasta 
Clara for Pacific Congress Springs. 

^^ On Saturdays only, the Santa Cruz R. R, cson- 
nects with this train at Pa.iaro for Aptos and Santa 
Cruz. Rbturn-ino, passengers leave Santa Cruz at 4:30 
A.M. Mondays (breakfast at Gilroy), arriving in San Fran- 
cisco at 10:00 A.M. , 

6^-* Special Notice.— On SATURDAYS ONLY, the 
run of this tmin will he extended to SA.LIXAS, connect- 
ing with the M. and S. V. R. R. for MONTEREY. Re- 
turning, leave Monterey MONDAYS (Breakfast at Gil- 
roy), arriving at San Francisco at 10:00 a.m. 

A AQ P-M. (daily) for San Jose and Way Stations. 
g gQ P.M. (daily) for Meulo Park and Way Stations. 

^^ SUNDAYS an EXTRA TRAIN will leave for San 
Jose and Way Stations at 9:30 A.M. Returning, will 
leave San Jose at d:00 p.m. 

^^ Excursion Tickets to San Jose and other points 
and return sold on Saturdays and Sunday nioruinga. 
Good for return until following- Monday inclusive. 

&^ Also, EXCURSION TICKETS to MONTEREY— 
Good from Saturday until following Monday inclusive. 
A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 

H. R. JUDAH, Assistant Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

SOUTHERBT DIVISION'S. 

i^~ Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the cars of tlie Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO via Ferrv 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave. Los 
Angeles, Wilmington, Anaheim. Colton, Colorado River 
and Yir.MA. July 27. 



S. p. C. R. R. 

(NARROW GAUGE.) 

NEW ROrTE TO ALA^IEDA. SAX JOSE 
AND SANTA CHI'Z. 

SUMMER AKRANGEMENT, 1878. 

(^oniineucliig' Saturday, Jnne 1, 1S7S, 
^ and until further notice, trains and boats will leave 
San Francisco at the New Ferry Landing, Market street; 



K r^ i^ A. m. , via Alameda Ferry, daily, for Alameda, 
tJt^^y^ West San Leandro.West San Lorenzo, Mount 
Eden, Alvarado, Hall's, Newark, Mowry's, Alviso, Ag- 
new's, Santa Clara, San Jose, Lovelady's, Los Gatos, Alma. 



9 0/~\ A. M., via Alameda Ferry, daily, for Alameda; 
• -jVJ Newark, Alviso, Santa Clara, San Jose, Los 
Gatos, Alma, and all Way Stations, connecting at Los 
Gatos with CoIktovo's stages for Oil Wells, Patchen, 
Mountain Charley's, Martin's Ranch, Scott's Valley and 
Sanla Cruz, or via Wright's Summit, Hotel de Redwood, 
Comstock's Mill, Mason's Grove, Sequel to Santa Cruz. 
Also connecting at Los Gatos with Blabon's stages for 
Saratoga and Congress S/n'iugs. (Dinner at Los Gatos.) 



via Alameda Ferry, daily, for Alameda, 
Newark, Santa Clara, Sa.a Jose, Alma, and 
all Way Stations. 



4.20' 



g^^ On Saturdays only stages will connect with the 
4.20 I'.M. train at Los Gatos for Santa Cruz and Saratoga. 
Returning, leave Santa Cruz at 4 a.m., Monday (breakfast 
at Los Gatos), arriving in San Francisco at 10.15 a.m. 



Ferries aud I^ocal Trains will Rdii as 
Follows: 



LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO DAILY. 



y.M. 

6.20 



LEAVE HIGH STREET (ALAMEDA) DAILY. 



P.M. 

4.20 



P.M. 

7.00 



•Sundays only. 
THOS. CARTER, 
Superintendent. 



GEO. H. WAGGONER, 
[June 1.] Gen. Pas. & Tkt Agt. 



C. p. R. R. 



Commencmg Wednesday, July lOth, 1878, and un- 
til further notice, Trains and Boatswiil Leave 
SAW FRANCISCO: 



7f\f\ A. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
• V/W street Landing -— Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
and Sacramento. Connecting at Davis (Sundays except- 
ed) for Woodland, Williams and Knight's Landing. 

(Arrive Ban Francisco 8:55 p.m.) 



8f\f\ A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
•^^ land Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland (Or.), Colfax, Reno (Virginia City), Pali- 
sade (Eureka), Ogden and Omaha. Connects at Gait 
with train arriving at lone at 3:40 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:35 p.m.) 



8 0/^ A.M. (Sundays only), Special Train via Oak- 
**jy' land Ferry, arrives at Martinez 10.15 A.M. 
Returning, leaves Ma'rtinez 4.10 P M„ arrives San Fran- 
cisco 6:00 P.M "Excursion Tickets at Heduced Rates." 

9 0i^ A.M. (Sundays excepted), Northern Railway 
•OV Accommodation Train (via Oakland Ferry) 
to Martinez. (Arrive San Francisco 3:35 p.m. 



land Ferry and Nilcs), stopping at all Way Sta- 
Arrives at &in Jose at 5:30 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



30 |"i P.M. (daily) Northern Railway Passenger Train 
»0\J (via Oakland Ferry) to San Pablo and Mar- 
tinez. (Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



4(\f\ P.M. (daily) Express Train (via Oakland Ferry), 
•^^ for Lathropand Stockton, Merced, Visalia, Sum- 
ner. Mojave. Newhall (San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara), 
Los Akqelbs, "Santa Monica," Wilmington, Santa Ana 
(San Diego), Coltonand Yuma (Arizona Stages and Colo- 
rado River Steamers). 

"Sleeping Cars" between Oakland, Los Angeles and 
Yuma. Connects at Niles with train arriving at San 
Jose at6:55P.M. (Arrive San Francisco 1:2:40 r.ji.) 



A (\f\ P- M. (Sundays excepted) Vallejo Steamer (from 
"*'^^ Market Street Landing), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento ; and at Sacramento with Pas- 
senger Train, leaving at 9:35 p.m. on Tuesdays, T/lurs- 
days and .S'a^urday^on^i/.forTruckee, Reno, Carson aud 
Virginia, 

" Sleeping Cars" between Vallejo and Carson. 

(Arrive San Francisco 11:10 a.m.) 



4C\C\ P- M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
,\J\J (f rom Wash'n St. Wharf), for Benicia and Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sacra- 
mento at 9:0Oa-M., daily. (ArrivcSan Francisco S:00 p.m. 



4 0A P.M. (daily), Through Third Class and Accom- 
•Oi/ modation Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, 
arriving at Los Angeles on second day at 11:55 A..y. 

(Arrive San Francisco 7:30 a.m. 



FERRIES AND LOCAL TRAINS) 



From '*SAN FRANCISCO," Paily. 



TO 
OAKLAND. 


< 

•< 




A. M. 


p. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


B6 10 


12.30 


7.00 


B6.10 


7.00 


1.00 


8.00 


7.30 


7.30 


1.30 


0.00 


8.30 


8.00 


2.00 


10.00 


9.30 


8,30 


3.00 


11.00 


10.30 


9.00 


3.30 


12.00 


11.30 


S).30 


4.00 


r. M. 


p. M. 


10.00 


4.30 


1.30 


12.30 


10.30 


5.00 


2.00 


1.00 


11.00 


5.3U 


■3.00 


3.30 


11.30 


6.00 


4.00 


4.30 


12.00 


6.30 


5.00 


6.30 




7.00 


6.00 


6.30 




8.10 


B'7.00 


7.00 




9.20Ib'S.;O 


8.10 




10.30|C-1030 


9.20 




e11.45'b'114o 


10.30 
EIL45 



"5s 



8.00 
to.so 

p. M. 
tl.OO 
3.00 
4.00 

ts.io 



A. H. 

8.00 
to. 30! 
P. M. 
3.O0I 
4.00 

ts.io 



tChange Cars 

at 
East Oakland 



7. 

8,30 
9.30 
10 30 
11.30 
P. M. 
1.00 
4,00 
6.00 
6.00 



4 

o 



B6.10 

8.00 
1000 
p. M. 
3.00 
4.30 
6.30 
0.00 



^—Sundays excepted. c— Sundays onla. 

*Alameda Passen^rs chanfre cars at Oakland. 

To FERNSIDE — except Sundays— 7.00, 9.00, lOOO 
A.M., and 6:00 P..M. 

To SAN JUSE — DaU y— t9:30A.M., 3;00, 4:00 P.M. 



To " SAy FBANCISf O," Bully. 





>> 


°^2 


oa 


?-<« 


£« 


'^^ 


"B 






a 


n 


A. M. 


A. 11. 


B6.30 


E5.40 


8.00 


7.30 


10.00 


8.30 


p. M. 


9.30 


3.00 


10.30 


4 30 


1130 


6.30 


p. M. 




1.00 




4.00 




6.00! 




6.00' 



Change Cara 

at 
West Uaklnd. 



A. M. 

B'5.00 

B'6.40 

•0 2.'» 

7.00 

8.03 

9.00 

10.03 

11.03 

12.00 

p. M. 

1.00 

3.00 

■3.20 

4.00 

6.00 

6.03 

B«?.20 

B-8.S0 

*iaoo 



A. M, 

t6.45 
7.55 
11.15 
ni.45 
p. M. 
3.40 









A. M, 

t7.0S 
8.16 

11.35 

p. u. 

tl2.0 

4.03 

t4.45 



tChange Cars 

at 
East Oakland 



<\ (Broadway.) 



A. M. I A. M. 

B 6.10; B 5.20 
B 6.50. B 6.00 

6K0| 6.50 

7.401 

8.40{ 

9.40 
10.40 
11.401 



p. M. 

12.40 
1.25 
2.40 
4.40 
5.40 
6.40 
7.50 
9.0O 

10.10 



7.20 
7.50 
S.2o 
8.60 
9.20 
9.50 
10.20 
10.50 
11.20 
11.60 



p. ii. 

12.20 

12 50 
1.20 
1.50 
2.50 
3.20 
3.50 
4.20 
4.50 
6.20 
5.50 
6.25 
650 
8.00 
9.10 

10.20 



^—Sundays eaicepted. 
'Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 
From FERNSIDE— except Sundays— 8.0O, 10.00, I 
4.M., and 6.00 P.M. 
FROM SAN JOSE- Daily— 7:05 and 8:10 A .M. 



rREEK ROUTE. 

From SANFRANCIS0O-ilai;jr-Bli:30, »7:20, SJ5, 9:16, 

10:15, 11:16 A.M , 12:15, 1:16, 2;25, 3:15. 4:15, 6:16, 

6:16 P.M. 
From OAKLAND— Zla!/y-B6:20, B7:I0, 8:05, 9:05. 10:06, 

11.05 A.M., 12:05, 1:06, 3:15, 3:05, 4:05, 5:05, 6:05 P.M. 

B — Daily, Sundays excepted. 



" Official Schedule Time" furnished by Anderson & 
Ran'BOLPU, Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. Towh'E, General Superintendent. 



S. p. R. R. 

CNORTHBBN DIVISION.) 
SPECIAl, AJfSJOrSIOEMEIirT. 

C^oranieuciiis Sntnrilay, Jnly 13, 1878, 
J EXCUmiON TICKETS will be sold by this Com- 
pany from SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN JOSE AND OTH- 
ER POINTS AND RETURN, 

At Greatly Baduced Hates. 

(Tickets to San Jose, good for Return by either the 
Southern or Central Pacific Railroads,) 

These Tickets will besoMONLY on SATURDAYS and 
SUND.W MORNINGS. 

The RETURN TRIP Ticket will not be good for pas- 
sage after the MONDAY followingthe date of purchase. 

TICKET OFFICES— Passenger Depot, Townsend St., 
and at Valencia street Station. 

A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 

H. R. JUDAH, Ass't Passenger and Ticket Ag't. 

Notice. "SAN JOSE Excursion Tickets (via C. P. R. 
R.) can be purchased at the offices of the Central Pacific 
Railroad, Oakland Ferry, foot of Market street, Sau 
Francisco; also at the several Ticket Offices in Oakland. 
(July 20,1 



CON&BD LISE. 

BrKisli and North Ainerlcaii Royal 
Mail Steamsliipa between NEW YORK and LIV- 
ERPOOL, calling at IJUEENSTOWN, sailing from New 
York EVERY WEDNESDAY. 

BOTHNIA My 16-Je 19-Jy 24— A 28 -O 2 

ALGERIA My22— Je2e-Jy31— ....— S 4— O 9 

RUSSIA My29— ....— Jy 3— Ag7-Sll— 16 

SC^TUIA Je 5— Jy 10— A 14.. SIS -0 23 

ABYSSINIA Je 12-Jy 17-A 21-S 25-0 30 

Passage can be secured and all infomiution given on 
application to WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD S CO., 

May IS. 218 California at. 



Change Cars 

at 
West O'klamI 






^ng. 3, I$7& 



CALIFOKNIA ADVERTISER. 



18 



Notabilla. 



THE "AUTOMATia" 
What make:* the HcamstretM' t4iil but play* 

A* sih-ntlv, without ileUv, 
It nhfliK-a ta^h tuok t« foM luvay? "AUTOMATIC." 
"What Hcwi* with Kpoeil, and niiis so light 

OVr Milkfii (mIh's tT flt-ecv whit*?. 
Ami It-avea uo aL-hinn b.>ncs at night? *' AUTOMATIC." 
Wee of " Autoumtic " Machine, 124 VnAt street. 



%e phonograph hiLs alrvaily hoeti put to a practical nse, according to 
yfttir, which stjitos that the folhiwin^' Mvry is pood and ijuite as true 
leed \*e: A well known nmnai^er r«.'ceived, a few days ago, a letter 
m Paris, eneUwin;; the photnyraph of a lrt<ly, and what appeared t<i be 
foil neatly fidded up and euriuiisly indented. The letter wits to this 
rport: "Sir, I encli>j*e iihoto;,Taph of myself in the part <if Traviata, 
1 spefinieni* of ray voice. Please state, hy wire, terms, and the date 
en I tan appear at your theater. I have the hoD'>r to be. sir, yours, 
B." The poor manager, wliose scientific e<liication had evidently been 
fUwted, was puzzled. The photosfraph showed a lady of attractive 
•ence, the letter wiis to the point, and the spelling' American. But 
r to discover a lady's vtiice from a '* tin-foil curiously indented " passed 
oomprehen^ion. He consulted his friends, one of whom had seen the 
onoixaph at the Crystal Palace. An adjournment to that resort of 
palor joy and education was nnaniraously voted. The foil was adjusted 
the instrument, and after a few revolutions of the machine the notes of 
kh fors' e lui " resounded with urystaline clearness. An immediate en- 
[pement of the ludy wiis the natural result. 

Why ia a theater drop-curtain so called? Because the gentlemen 
out t<t take a drop whenever it comes d<n\'n. But the ladies (God bless 
n) have tn wait until the performance closes. Then is the time they 
teven, thnuj^h, for the Original Swuin's B:iker3' and Restaurant is still 
213 Sutter street. With their usual good taste, they all drop in there 
id indulLje to their heart's content in the ice cream and other delicacies 
can he obtained here to perfection. 

A young man, who practiced nightly on a flute, fell out of a second 

iry window a few evenings since, and was picked up insensihle. Sev- 
" neighbors who witnessed the accident felt a thrill of joy, and rushed 
it off for a physician. They were afraid the young Bute-plaj'er would 
tver, which was not necessary, for the neighbors had his photograph, as 

bken hy Bradley & Rulofson, which was a better reminder ©f him than 

s music. 

On the death of Lord Kennet, in 1786, Sir William Nairne was 
lised to the bench under the title of Lord Dunsinnan — a circumstance 

hii-'h called forth a bon mot from the Duchess of Gordon. Her grace, 
apjiening to meet his h>rdship shortly after his elevation, inquired what 
tie he had assumed. " Dunsinnan," was, of course, the reply. " I am 
itonished at that, my lord," said the duchess, "for I never knew that 
ou had begun sinning." 

i Another sad accident by pouring coal-oil on the fire to make it burn. 
This time it is a red haired boy. If they will only stick to red-haired 
)oys, to say nothing of red-haired girls, we are saved. But they might 
[lave both the boys and girls, as well as ourselves, by sticking to the Union 
,nge. J. De La Montanya, Jackson street, below Battery, is the agent. 



The Central Hotel, at Shanghai, which was opened about three years 
kgo, will compare very favorably with similar establishments in Europe. 
The rooms are of good eize, fitted with electric bells — a great boon to 
ravelers. The attendance and table are satisfactory. Its position at the 
:oruer of the Nanking-road and the Bund is, as its name implies, central. 

Before and After. — A dreamy writer says it would be curious to fol- 
ow a pound of siUc from its spinning until it becomes a lady's dress. No 
loubt ; but most men would prefer to follow it after it becomes a dress, 
kud while the lady was in it. 



For up'wards of thirty years Mrs. Wikslow's Soothing Syrup has 
been used for children. It corrects acidity of the stomach, relieves ivind 
colic, regulates the bowels, cures dysentery and diarrhaay whether arising 
from teething or other causes. An old and well-tried remedy. Twenty- 
five cents a bottle. 

A paper published at San Jose has suspended, the editor bitterly re- 
marking that he "cannot live on wind." And yet he evidently supposed 
that his readers could^ 

A schoolmaster thus describes a money-lender: "He serves you in 
the present tense ; he lends in the conditional mood ; keeps you in the 
subjective ; and ruins you in the future," but Landsberger's Champagne 
keeps you in a pleasant mood at all times. 

Germans have the reputation of being very economical, and yet what 
reckless extravagance they display in spelling " Musick Halle." 



It is noTV proposed to get up a race between Molly McCarthy and 
Oleomargarine. If the weather is as hot as on the day of her last race, it 
would be safe to bet on a pound of oleomargarine as the fastest runner ; 
but at the same time, for a side bet, we will go eleven to eight that Napa 
Soda will be the best cooler. 



The fishing is excellent in the Paper Mill Creek, and there are 250,000 
mosquitoes to one fish. 

There is a ^7onderful power in imagination, but it gets weak in the 
knees when it undertakes to shoulder circus lemonade, or do without F. & 
P. J. Cassin's 0. K. Plantation Whisky. 

Two Buttln' Kids— A young goat fight. 



TO LET, 

QUEEN'S THEATER. DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND. 

rilhiN olcffuiit mill coiniHuilloiiN Thcntcr, HUiiHt«tt In the 

X luai" tl.on>unlifiiru hi tlit- liiart n( tin- Iiinrust elty In New Xwiliiiid, ctiii bo nh- 
tuiried for Umg or short ilnU's on vcrj- iiuKlcnte U'niiH. Kruni its central |msitiiiti. it 
ahvnjs coinimimls Inrgu imd fiishiiniiible auJieiicott u> Iu>,'iliumte eiitertiiliinniiiti* iiml 
Ursl-cIiiM talont. The Interior hiu* rucontly been isuniptiiniiMly furiilNbed, UrcHHCirulc 
unil StiilN ImvinK purtitlonoil hciiIh in Utnx'lit Velvut uiid I^uutlicr, itiid other auixiint- 
niuiits of the most iipproveU kind. The sttijfo 1h well fiirniKlicd with Scenic l'n)i»er- 
tifs, mid the noevssury re<|uireiiieiit8 fur Opura, CuiiL-tirt ur Uninm. 

The building hiis been proiiminced the beat vontlliktud und most euinfortiiblc Theater 
in the Austnilasliis. Seating lurconmiodatioii, l.SuO. All ratea, water and gas are 
included in the hiring. 

Pupulatiun of Uuiiudin and suburbs, about 2G,000. 

Correspondence and eouimunie-fttlous invited from (rienda, rospoiisiblo managers, 
etc. For teniia and dates apply t-» (JEoUOK IL WEST, 

Theatrieal and Concert Agent, Music Warehouse, Duiiedin, N. Z., Sole Agent, 

Whore all prufessiunul correspondence can be addressed, and advice or information 
ubtiiined. July 20. 

SODA! SODA! 

SCHWEPPE'S SODA WATER! 

With HENNESSY BRANDY, forms a perfect combinatiou. 
8CHWEPPES TONIC WATtE! 

The morft pure and perfect appetizer knowu. 
SCHWEPPE'S POTASS WATEi ! 

A sure cure for djspepsia. 
SCHWEPPE'S MALVERN SELTZER! 
Bottled at the celebmted Malvern Springs, Worcestersliire ; highly recommended 
by all Physicians. I. SCHWEFPi; * CO., 

Bcriiers anil OxfortI streets, Ijoiitlou. 
Regular Consignments received by BENJ. F. RILEY, 

July 13. 318 Front St., up stairs. 

THE BERKELEY GYMNASIUM, 

A Preparatory School to the TTniversity- 

AOrst-cInss RoardiiiS' Scbool, estnbllMlietl ia the luterenta 
of higher education, and in oppuyitiun to the cramming system of the small 
colleges and military academies of the State. The next term will commence July 
24th. Examination of candidates for admission July 2'2d and 23d, Uy request, in- 
structions have been provided during the Summer months for etudents "preparing for 
the August examinations at the University. 

For catalugues or particulars address JOHN F. EURRIS, Berkeley, Cal. 

NoTK.— We desire to call special atiention to the organization of our Grammar De- 
partment, sepanite from the Academical, and solicit the patronage of parents and 
guardians of small boys. June 8. 

THE NEW GYMNASIUM. 

Athletic Curriculum, Xo. 212 Sutter street, Y. HI. €. A. 
Building, San Francisco. L'rof. ALFRED PEllRIEK, Teacher of Athletics; 
Mons. A. VAUtHlER, Assistant Teacher of Athletics; Prof. HARKY MAYNARD. 
Teacher nf Boxing. The Best Ai)iK)inted Gymnasium on the Pacific Coast. Open 
Daily {Sundays excepted) from 10 o'clock A.M. to 5:30 r m., and from 7:30 to 10 p.m. 
Terms— PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Adults, §2 per month. Boys and Misses under 
10 years of age, $1 per month. Lessons in Boxing and Fencing, Extra. Juno 22. 



WASHINGTON COLLEGE, 

Washington , Alameda County , California. 

The Thirteenth Senil*Anuual Term of this lustltutiou will 
conmicnce on THURSDAY, August 1st, 1878. For fidelity and ability in 
teachers, for purposes of a solid, practical education, and for healthfuhiess and beauty 
of surroundings, this institution will compare favorably with any on the Pacific 
Coast. For catalogues and further information, address 
July 6. S. S HARMON, Principal. 

MILLS' SEMINARY. 

rilhls well-kiiowu Institution lor Vouu;; I^adies will com- 

1 mence its next term WEDNESDAY, July 31st. With its tine commodious 
buildings, its ample grounds, and its lai-gc and elticient corps of Teachers, the insti- 
tution offers unrivaled advantages for a thorough and finished education. All letters 
of inquiry and all communications relative to admission should be addressed 

REV. C. T. MILLS, 
Juno 22. Brooklj'u, Alameda county, California. 

REMOVAL. " 

The Office of the Goltleu Chariot Hliiing Conipauy, Diana 
Gold and Silver Mining Company, Golden Gate Con. Hydraulic Mining Com- 
pany, Minnietta Belle Silver Mining Company, and Hazard Gravel Mining Company, 
has removed from Room 22, Merchants' Exchange, to 

Booms 13 and 14, 318 Pine Street. 
July 13. J. T. McGEOGHEGAN, Secretary. 

REMOVAL 

Laver Jk Curlett, Architects, Turulsh Plans, Specifications 
and Superintendence for the Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Houses, 
and every description of Building. Office : 19 S. F. Stock Exchange Building, Pine 
street, San Francisco. [Take the Elevator.] June 15. 

REMOVAL. 

Edwaril S. Spear A Co., Auciioncers, will remove July 1st 
to No. 729 Market street, between Third and Fourth, opposite Dupont. Reg- 
ular Sale Days — Wednesdays and Saturdays. July 6. 

REMOVAL 

W. Patrick, Teacher of the Piano, has moved his res- 

, idence to 113 PAGE STREET, San Francisco. July 13. 



H. 



F 



QUICKSILVER. 

lorsale—In lots tosuit, by Thomas Bell, Ko. 305 Sansome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



F 



GOOD BOYS. 

lor any service may he had without chargres nt the Touth*s 

Free Directory, 1417 Howard street. [May 11.] A. P. DIJ^TZ, Agent. 



w 



ALICE ROSE, 

ood £ng:raver, 600 Sloutj^ouiery street, Boom 31, third 

story, San Francisco. April 6. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 3, 1878, 



CRADLE, ALTAR, AND TOMB, 

CRADLE. 

Allks— In this city, July 2l8t, to the w ife of Newton F. Allen, a son. 
BiBBKBOALi.— In this citv, July — , to the wife of J. Eibberj^'all, a daughter. 
Davis— In this citv, Julv 26th. to the wife of D. S. I>avi8, a son. 
Davidso.n— In this" city, July 30th, to the wife of A. Davidson, a daughter. 
Edwards— Id this city, July 29th, to the wife of D. Edwards, a son. 
Haley— In this city, Julv 27th, to the wife of James W. Haley, a daughter. 
JosES -In this city, Julv 23d, to the wife of T. H. Jones, a son. 
Lyo.v— In Lakeport, July 23d, to the wife of G. A, Lyon, Jr., a son. 
LiEBMAyN— In New York City, July i:(th, to the wife of M. Liebmann, a son. 
SiiEMAXSRi — In this city, July 27th, to the wife of Julius Shenianski, a daughter. 
SOBBY— In this city, July 9th, to the wife of E. G. Sobey, a daughter. 
Tut— lu this city, July 29th, to the wife of Julius Tift, a eon. 
Von Olaun— In this city, July 29tb, to the wife of Christian Vou Glahn, a son. • 

AI.TAR. 

AsDER80S-OwE>-— In San Jose, July 2Sth. Karl D. Anderson to Elma B. Owen. 
BovRES-DoRSKY— Ic this city, July 27th, George H. Boyken to Fraouis Dorsey. 
CLOiou-HiTcncocK-In Oakland, July 27th, Alton H. Olough to Ella Hitchcock. 
De Forrest-Gray — In Oakland, July 26th, Henry L. De Forrest t-> Fannie Gray. 
Darsie-Brasder— In this city, July 27th, George Darsie to Mrs, T. S. Brander. 
Henderkos-Callfield— In this city, July 27th, J. L. Henderson to C. D. Caulfield. 
Kkone-Vas Lake— In this city, July 27th, Alex. Krone to Ella V. Lake. 
Nayloh-Grauam— In this city, July 29th, Joseph Naylor to Jessie M. Graham. 
O'BitiEN-BETowsKY— In this city, July «th, Mor^jan J. O'Brien to Mary Betowsky. 
Skivisotos-Fihubr— In this citv, July 29th, John F. &kivington to Anna M. Fisher. 
Tabrk-Hicks— In this city, July 2Sth, Fred. K. Taber to Mrs. F. A. Hicks. 
YouNG-MoyEB.— Id tliia city, July 2yth, Wm. Young to Mrs. Zella Moyer. 

TOMa 

Becir— In this city, July 29th, Martin Becir, aged 20 years. 

Buckley— In this city, July 31st, Joseph (J. Buckley, aged 13 years and 7 months. 

Bi'SDscui"— In this city, July 30th, Louis F. Buodschu, aged 21 j-eara. 

Bevkr— In this city, July 27th, Louis Beyer. a^'Cd 54 years. 

Cl'tting— In this city, July bOth, Edward Cutting, aged 71 years and 4 months. 

Cofkey— In this city, July 29th, Patrick Coffey, aj^ed 60 years. 

HESNESSEV-In this citv, July 30th, David Hennessey, aged 56 years. 

Leooe — In this city, July 27th, James E. L^ge, aged 34 years. 

MOLiSEUX— In this city, July3l9t, Wm. Molineu.v, aged 02 years. 

Norton— In Oakland. July 30th, Mrs. Agnes C. Nonon, aged 21 years. 

Neil — In this city, July 3l8t. David Neil, aged 40 years and 11 months. 

Pattesbo-v- In this citv. July 27th, Antonio Pattenson, aged 22 years. 

Pettitt— In Oakland, July 23th, Wm. Francis Pettitt, aged 4 years and 9 months 

Kutis- In this city, July 30th, Caroline Russ, aged 48 years. 

Itij,-Es_In this city, July 29th, T. Oscar Rines, aged 44 years. 

Small — In this city, July 30th, William Small. 

Wabk— In this city, July 29th, Joseph Wark, aged 54 years. 

THE JEWISH ORDER BENAI B'RITH OF CAIiIFORNIA. 



The success of the Jewish Societies known as the Independent Order 
Benai Berith of California, with a majority of members in San Francisco, 
where the Grand Lodge holds its session, induced them to decide on pur- 
chasing a lot and erecting a building thereon, suitable for their own ac- 
commodation. With that object in view, a committee was appointed, 
who selected and purchased a lot, fi5 by 137i feet, on the southerly side of 
Eddy between Mason and Taylor streets, and then decided to select a 
design from a competition of local architects. Three architects were se- 
lected out of the original number, and requested to modify their designs; 
these being received, were examined by the committee, who selected the 
one prepared by Laver & Curlett. We heartily congratulate the com- 
mittee on their tine appreciation of the architects' combination of the 
three things essential to truearchitecture: ''Fitness, Beauty and Stability." 
Doubtless the following description of the structure will not be uninter- 
esting to our readers: 

The building, which occupies the lot 65 by 137 feet 6 inches, except a recess on sides 
5 feet by 68 feet, for light and ventilation, has a main entrance which is 15 feet wide 
and located in the center of building, with a spacious store on either side, under the 
show windows of which are steps to basement. Between each store and the outer 
line of building is a hallway. The one on the eastern line of building leads lo base- 
ment, and the other is to be used on spet;ial occasions. The front hall extends b^ck 
a distance of 26 feet, and is then intercepted by another hall of equal width, and 
forming a T with unequal arms, and cunnecting with side entrance. At the end of 
cross-hall to the right stands a passenger elevator, tastefully decorated and sur- 
rounded hy a wide staircase, the first landing of which is joined by a lesser one 
from side entrance. The ticket office is locat^ at rear of store to right of entrance, 
and opens into front hall; to the left of elevator, but entered from grand hall is 
located the ante-room for gentlemen; opp<i3ite the elevator, at end of hal!, is situ- 
ated the ladies' parlor, with hat and cloak-room, toilet room, etc., and door leading 
from ladies' parlor to grand hall, the main entrance to hall being through double 
doors opposite front halt Passing through the doors, we enter a vestibule, on each 
side of which is a carved staircase leading to gallery, which extends aromid entire 
hall, except over stage. The gallery is self-sustaining, and C'onsequently no columns 
to impede the onward whirl of the lovers of Terpsichore over a waxed surface 90 
feet by 53 feet 6 inches. The grand hall is 30 feet in bight; the ceiling is made in 
the form of an ellipse and divided into a series of deep panels. In the panels are 
placed ventilators. The ball is lighted from each side by a number of windows 
placed over gallery, and at niirht two sunbumers and a number of branch lights will 
make the hall as attractive as [xtssible. A convenient stage occupies the center of 
further end, and on each side is a retiring room with staircase in each, one leading 
to givllery of hall and the other to banquet hall in basement, which occupies a space 
of GO feet by 53 feet 6 inches, directly under grand hall. Gentlemen's hat room, toi- 
let rooms, etc., are situated in basement, with staircase leading from ante-rooras on 
first floor. Frout of basement to be used as a saloon and billiard-room, with private 
rooms attached. Kitchen, serving room, barroom, etc, , occupy balance of basement, 
all of which are amply lighted and ventilated. The portion of building on second 
story front is to be occupied by the Grand Secretary's otfiees, library and reading- 
rooms for members of their own Order, and also ladies" toilet room connected with 
library, and also one for gentlemen, entered from main hall. On the third and 
fourth floors are located the lodge rooms of the Order, three on each floor, with Tylers 
and Preparation rooms to each, also Committee and other rooms in each story. The 
front lodge room is 51 feet by 34 feet, the middle one 57 feet by 36 feet, and one in 
rear 42 feet by 33 feet — the third and fourth stories being 19 feet and 18 feet in hight 
respectively. The front is treated in the modernized Florentine style, topped by a 
Mansard roof and surmounted by a tower 100 feet high, on which is attached a tall 
flag-post, with the ever-bcautif ui stars- and-stripes. 

St John's Preabyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor. The Rev. Wm. A. Scott, I).D., pastor, will preach Sunday at 
11 A.M. and 7A p.m. Public cordially invited. Sunday School and Bible 
Classes, 9^ a. si.; Prayer and Praise Service 6i p.m. 



Erug Champagne. — Private Cuvee, in quarts and pints; Shield — 
Krug — in quarts and pints; Premiere Qualite, in quarts and pints. For 
sale by Hellman Bros. & Co., corner Front and Jackson. 



COUNTRY RESORTS. 



SWANTON HOUSE, PESCADERO. 

T bis Popular Hotel, together wiili tlie 4letaclie:l Cottn^es. 
which are not tlie least of its attractive features, liave been newly furnishod 
throughout, and are now o]>en for the reception of guests. Those desiring to visit 
the most enjoyable of all our sea-side resorts, can make no mistake in deciding upon 
Pescadero. 

IT IS EASILY BEACHED, 
and is unsurpassed in the exL'ellence of its climate, the beauty of its scenery, and in 
the attractiveness of its truly remarkable sea beach. Those extraordinary pebbloa, 
among which are to be found" agates, opals, sapphires, eto., were never so numeroua 
as now, the past Winter having thrown up immense numbers of curiously-shaped 
stones, which tor ages have been subiceted to the everlasting motions of the tirelesa 
Pacific. GOOD TKOUT FISHING is obtainable in the Pescadero river. 
X^" The hotel prices are fixed to suit the times. [April 27. 

TERRACE SWIMMING BATHS, 

Foot of Webster Street, on Central Avenue, Alameda Beach. 

Now open to the public, ami pronouucetl by tbe *'elite'' of 
San Francisco and Oakland as the only place for a good bath on the Pacific 
Coast. Perfect security against monsters of the deep, and high water at all times 
of day and night. 

Special Accommodations for Ladies Unattended 

Reached in thirty-five minutes from San Francisco by steamer NEWARK— depot 
on the premises -or C. P. R. R. to Mastic Station, and from Oakland by horse-cars 
at Broadway Station, running within two blouks of Baths. 
BATHS, 25 CENTS, 
Includinff Private JRoom, Hathino Suit, Towels, Shoiver Saths, etc, 

July 13. _^__ _ __ K. HALEf, Proprietor. 

PACIFIc"0CEAirH6uSE, 

SANTA CRUZ, CAIilFORNIA. 

Tbis eleg'ant establishment has been completely renoTated 
throughout, and offers special attractions and. inducements to the public. 
The additii>n of a large play and CROtiUET grounds, the iucreasintr of DANCING 
accommodations, are the latest improvements for the ple*isure of the guests. It is 
the ONLY hotel at Santa Cruz tlmt can claim pre-emineni.e as a FIRST-CLi^SS 
HOUSE of entertainment, being the best regulated and sustained in this famous 
summer resort. [May 11.] J. H. HOADLEY, Pioprietor. 

OCEAN VILLA, 

SANTA CRUZ. CALIPORNTA. 

G citric K. Bliss, Proprietor.»IjHrKe, well-foruishedRoomSf 
Single or in Suites. Cottages for families that desire them. Grounds large, 
romantic and pleasant. Situated forty feet above tide water, having a beautiful view 
of the Bay, Ocean, City and Mountains. Premises e-xtend to river's edge, affording 
rare facilities for Boating, Bathing and Fishing. No pains spared to please our 
guests. P. O. Box lU(i. July 13. 

THE GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 

JC Olmstefl Is happy to auuoauce to bis friends and the 
■ public that he ha.s became associated with MR, .1. W. BLACK, and it is pro- 
posed to make THE GRAND CENTRAL as popular as it was during his former three 
years management. Tlie prices for board and rooms are as reasonable as any one 
could desire, and the house and table will be kept fully up to its former reputation. 
Oakland, Ma y 1, 1378. May 18 . 

PARISIANHOUSE. 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA. 

The proprietor of the above Tavorite resort takes pleasure 
in informii.g his patrons and the public that he has entirely renovated his es- 
tablishment, to which he has luided a splendid Garden, with Arbors, Swings, and ev- 
erj-thing for the comfort and amusement of visitors. Board and Lodging for Fam- 
ilies bv the week or month at moderate prices. 
April 13. ETIENNE SIVIEROIT. Proprietor. 

TAMALPAIS HOTEL. 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA. 

Tbls honsehas been (:. orou;;hly renovated and newly fnr> 
nished, and is now open to the public. Persons wishing rooms should apply 
early. Climate unsurpassed. Teims moderate. Special Rates for Families. 
Jyne 22. OSCAR LEWIS. Proprietor. 

SANTA CRUZ. 

Llddeirs Cottagres, on the Bench. Pleasant and Commo- 
dious Rooms. Fine Scenery. §10 per Week. Surf Bathing Included, July 13. 



«*." 



GREAT SACRIFICE 

Of Pianos ami Org^aus for Thirty Days. The largrestoch ol 
Hallet, Davis & Co.'s Pianos and George Woods x. Co.'s Organs will be sold at 
less than cost for the next thirty days. These celebrated instruments are the leading 
Pianos and Organs of the world, consisting of Grand, Square and Upright Pianos and 
Organs of everj' style WM. G. liADGER & CO., 

July 27. Nos. 7 and 9 Sansome street, near Market. 

FURTHER REDUCTION. 

THE SEATTLE C O A I. , 

CBEA.PES TUAJf XHJB CHEjlPXST. 

SS^ Ask Youi Dealer for it. 

[June 22.] 

W. MoRBls. Jos. Schwab. J. F. Kjsskbdt. 

MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO., 

Importers anil Dealers In Moldings, Frames, Eng-ravingrs, 
Chromos, Lithographs, Decalcoraanie, Wax and Artists' Materials. 21 Post 
street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. 



Feb. 4. 



THOMAS DAY, 

Importer of every vnriety of Oiks Fixtures, Crystal, Ollt, 
Steel aud Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
Bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 and 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
'='»'"'■ Jan. 27. 

FRANK KENNEDY, 

Law Office, 60-1 Merchant Street.— Probate, Divorce, Bank- 
ruptcy, and other cases attended to. Rents, and all other demands, collected, 
liad tenants ousted. Charge taken of real estate for residents, or absentees. Charges 
very reasonable. j^^. 12. 



Aug 8, 187a 



CALIFORNIA ADVEKTISEU. 



15 



OUR EXTRACTOR. 
Trovi Clt7 Rnd Conntry Ptms. 



Klneramy tbal tho air In the Suiru TuQiirl, ■• far In aa the oiM-iiIng liilo iho 
lai «!.'•' ItMOclrttl. la C4m»I mdiI iiIcamiiI, but tH>yoiiil lliat Dolot l\\v tu-at hvcoliics 
rDtit>1<-iK>uii-. .Vw/m indffrHJ^nt.^—iirtal (luaiilltifi uf notiny kwp coming' in, 
iIhI wi' hfnr llmi tho biia liiivc urvcr dnnt.' Pit wt-!l or worked Imrilrr.— •S'u/t //U4jo 
.\V«-« -^— A i-oimulrrahU* quantltr of cniin hiim t>»vn ohtpihfl from tU\* |K>rt— 5<l"?a 
/. ^ ( ; " ' •a.^— lUrvt-Bt m Sinuinift ciMiiity In ci>nu>lcUtl. Tlitr yli-ld of jjniln 
• 1 -.lii^ r :>i III iiitujil. The amfn.' crop will in nV pruh^ibllily Itf very larev. — Fuoi- 
.Ail /(-/!/ ," ^—Tb«* whi'ttt cropofthf StaU' In iii>t bnji-^'in^ bo well nn waei ex- 
prctiAl. Til.' heavy Spring' rains ncaMt-d much i;ritiii lu low p1iicc5. Chent inmilir 
prt-viiUmL, Rtiil thi" rii»t lurn b(«i; ditiuii;;inir— /6 ■^— Acconllnc to the WlUow* 
JounHU,\\w^r>\ ti)»laUini-iU of 300 men commenctHi to work iijion the norlliern 
bnnrh of the CiiUforDi« Pnclflc on Tiiewlav last.-^It l« certnin that iho qiinnlity 
CtT pHMl Mlieil thre«he<I in llii^ v.ilUy wMI be very nmall, Aa A rule, the u'niln Is 
murh I'lirnnken.- (■.(.«^nrri/?^ .Irr/i/x •^— riinch-f>ii'j« nrc reported iis hnvin;.' <le- 
itnived ti^oiil 4."^ acre* of %vheiil in San yWpwWwuyMn.- HnHufut Index ^^■Tho 
ff^ii'O Hrfttfilor myrc Uiimor hati it that ifn^'-.'in. ('nrr & Vo. conlemnlitic build- 
Idl' a nArrt>w' ^.tii^-e nillroiul Iron) Itakerffli-Id to tidewater. Cuut>c: tlielr frul^bt 
hlllti are tuu hi»:h on |iie Southom Paclllc Riiilrnud.-^Work at the Plloc<>ne t^htifl 
!• tn'ln;; priMifUted vi;;oroii*Iy, acd Iho SuvaK<M'nmpjiny are makin:; •.'ood heatl- 
way «ilhthrtrc. -Mountiihi .l/fi«,*';i!;»'r.— — The Bald Minintaln Kx. (.-o. «ro niftkiiic 
armiij^eintniA to start a tiiiinul tn work their sfoiiiul ettfr of tho Itald Mounlntn 
claim. -Jtt —The Sa/itn Clara Fchn reportu thiU furmcrain that re;:iim are busily 
cnL'a;:cd thrtshlni: out iheiryniiD.— — The Amailor Difinitcfi aUiti-s that the Vaii;;n 
mine '.« ntioul lobe prottjH-ctL-d and developi d. Several gentlemen of menns and 
experience have rei-ently taken hold of it and startid in to the work in earnest— 
The Eurtka S^ntintt declares there is no honest reanon for the recent decline in 
Kun'ka Con. stock. ■^—A'i/r*r lS'M/^ reports that a torrent mvept away erveral livt 
of Ir.ick on the Uii: Meadowf Railroad.— A correspondent of the Ji^no Oazdtf', 
ttns from Surptl-e Vulley, report* the crop' in tlmt vicinity to he in splendid 
CondUion, and that the valley lias not been disturhiHi by Indians.— The .Irwona 
Hiner siivs: The Southern Pnciflc Comp:my will eomni'-nce pnshint; their line o( 
ratlriMid alon^' up the Oila River from Yum i, ntiom the Jst of Oclober.-^^The 
chitlera In rBL"m;:iil Wadsworth.— TVrri/oriuV A*/(/<r/»m(;.^^Thedividend of $150,- 
0)0. paid by ihe Enreka (_'on. Company on the twentielh inst, makes a total of two 
mi. lion fix hundred and fifty thousand doMars disbursed by ihat company since its 
incnrporiilion, nvT-'inut ass**spmeiit levierl amounting' to one hundred thousand dol- 
lars. —/•fn/irr —The Tu^arora 'fimfif-Reriiii' tells of two assays made I'rotn 
Revenur roek which ^'-.ive Irom |tll 50 (o$i;jH>J pilver. and from ^20.0S to ti.40 
l[oId.^^n. Lowery and others, who bond'd the Alpha mine, in the Lake district, 
for ^fii.iKHi. until liieaDth of this month, will tike it. we nndorstJind. Recent rich 
developments have much lo do with the decision. — jBorfic iStandarU •^'^f^ir&'n on 
the Solano side of Putali Creek, near Win'eri^, is turnlni; out very well— eleven or 
twelve sacks lo the acre. This resion escaped the rust which struck the crain so 
heavily down PuLih Creek.- Wiultrti Adcocatf.^— The Lomnoc Record says there 
cnii be n»> doubt that an abundant ;*upply of artesian well waler may be obtained 
In almost anv portion of that valley at a depth of about 70 feet.— ^The Reno Gd- 
z^ft-f I'ays: 'The .ToneB i- Kinkara hnliion, now being tnrni-d out at the Anbnrn 
Mii\ Is nine hundred fine.^— The St. Hdenu ^/or states that all deer shipped from 
Iher"' now have their heads cut off, and arc otherwise so trimmed that it would be 
Impossible to distinguish the sex. The law aaainst killing fi^male deer is supposed 
to have !»omeihin^' to do with it.^^The Belmont Combination Mines have in real- 
ity ht'^n piirchasi-d by Stephen Roberts and Associates, The property will hcre- 
afrer he known as the'*IIif;h Brid;:e Con. Silver Mining Company.'' The new 
owihts will pu^h the work of development rapidly in the various levels, and at the 
samt- time resume sinking the main shaft. The led;:e is stripped for a considera- 
ble di^^lance. and sliows good ore all the wj^y.—Bdmont Courier.^^Thp Piocke 
Rfcnrd says the Chrlstv Company, at Silver Reef. Utah, shipped between the 14lh 
and nth of July, bullion valued at $4.601.87-— The Eureka {Col.) Standard vc- 
cords the occurrence of a heavy shock of earthquake, lastinfj about 4 seconds, in 
that city, on the nipht of the lilth inst.— ^The prospect lor a lartre hop crop in 
Napa and Mendocino counties is ^ood.— Vall(jo t'/ironif/^.— Ilalibut are cau^'ht 
in quitt- lari^e nuinbors off Cape Mendocino.— /**■;'(/«;«« ^-Iri/w.-The loss from 
met in this country will be fully fifty per cent. Barley is good, and is briosing 
seventy cent>« per cental. The acreaije of wheat this year is three times as much 
as iwn' years ago, and of barley twice aa much.-iS'rt/i Louh ObUpo Express.'-''^ 
The Kern County Democrat says that creat attention is being piiid to artesian 
wells In the San Joaquin Valley, and that water has been found In Stanislaus and 
Merced counties at comparatively sba. low depths. -^The P^taluma Argm is in- 
formed that the apple and peach crops there are nnu-milly large and ol good qual- 
ity. Of plums there is about half a crop. Nearly all the early sown grain was 
cut for hay, because of its having turned to cheat ; but there will be a good yield 
fW>ra thfttWhich was late sown. Corn and potatoes arc coming on finely.^— A 
ledijc showing promisinir silver ore has been discovered in the mountains, about 18 
miles north of Pyramid Lake.- FirgtHia CA7t.nic^(?. — The Keniuck Mine, in Gold 
Hill, operations upon which have for a lon^ time past been suspended, is about to 
be opened up ainiin". In early days this mine was very productive, and a large 
amount of ore was passed over that will pay to work.— //j —The mint is work- 
ing on Standard silverflolhirs. — Car^^on App/'al.''—'Sot for many seasons have the 
elements hceo so favorable for the ranchers in this part of the Stale as the present 
one. and the agricultural result will be a profllahle one. The wnnt of irritation 
has searcely been (eK^Cheny Creek I/idei)endent.—Tiie San Juan Transcript 
Bays that the gravel mines in that vicinity are about played oul.^— The MarynviUe 
Appeal^d.^, seen some fiue simples of wheal and barley from the tnle ranch of B. 
P. Johnson. The crop was raised in ninety days, and the grower is confident that 
all the tule lands in Sutter county will grow twenty bushels to the acre, if the seed 
Is sown at the proper season of theyear.^^Shipments of ore to Salt Lake City 
still continue, and h ive got to be a regular feature. Our chloriders arc well satis- 
fled with ihe market opened to W^f^m.— Eureka header. -^Hvaxy teams are leav- 
ing daily with machinery for the Esmeralda and Bodie minfs. — Carson Tribune. 
^^Amoug spvcritl recent discoveries in Richmond district, near Carlin, is one 
called the Coy.ofe, which was locjiled lastmonlh. Some work has been none on 
the claim, mainly thP sinking of an incline on the ledge. The bottom of the in- 
cline, thirteen feetdnep. is in ledge matter with three feet of solid ore. The coun- 
try formation is in limestone and porphyry.- £"1!^ A>,f(.^^An Antioch farmer's 
crop will yield a ton of wheat to the acre. Numerous other fields between An- 
tioch and Point Timber will make an equally good showing.— Bc/wwh/ Coui-ier. 
^^The Sierra Nevada Mill is still running on ore from the upper workings of the 
lead on Cedar Ilill.— Fir^inia £'/i/«;7»we.^— The water supply is Ciiling fast at 
Dutch Flat, and the mines thi-re will soon have to sh\itt\o\va.— Dutch I* lot Forum. 
^— The Santa Barbara Eree Press says that the grape crop in that vicinity has 
suffered very much from mildew.— ^Captain Pishon, of Old San Bernardino, bus 
an orchard planted, eighty trees to the acre, and his average has been two thousand 
oranges to the ncre.-- Los An-geies Star -^Tiie farmers near Petaluma find that 
the species ol' wheat called ""Proper" stands extreme dry and wet better than any 
other, and is very free from cheat. This variety has a large head, is rather flinty, 
and vields as hishas forty bushels to the acre. — Crescent City Courier.^— Tlie 
wheat yield of Ukiah Valley is rounhly estimated at sixty thousand bushels.- 
—Ukla/i />t-^a?cA,^— Grasshoppers have appeared in considerable numbers in. 
Hick's Valii-y, Marin county. They are of small size, and, as yet, have done little 
Aamnge.— Downey City Courier. 

' The conunlttee appointed by North Beach property owners to confer 
with the State Board of Harbor Commisaioners, had a conference with 
Commissioner Burns, on Friday last. Nothing definite was aooomplished, 
by reason of the absence of Commissioners Blanding and Lee. When 
they return to the city, it is probable that an invitation will be issued for 
the Governor and Mayor to attend the meeting ; and then it will be de- 
termined whether §100,000 shall be expended in improving the water 
front of North Beach, which we most cordially wish will be carried. 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOB WEEK ENDING ATTG. 2. 1878. 

GOMHtKD BY t;BUKUII O. UlCKOX tt CO., £30 MoKTOOMRKY UT. 



Null or MiNB. 



ArKvnt*. 

Andes i. .. 

Alnba 

* Altu 

•Ahw 

Iltillinn 

•Ueleher 

IteMt Si Itelchor.. 

Kenton 

It^Hlio 

CoiiH Imperial. .. 

♦Crown Volnt 

Choilar 

Califunda 

Coll. Virginia.... 

Caleilonia 

Ci'iitiilenco 

De Frees 

KiirekivCon 

Kxt^heijuer 

OouKl »V Currj' . . 

tJila 

•Cnitid Prize.... 
Halci& NorcroSb. 

Jnlia 

♦Justice 

Jaeksoii 

Keiitnek 

•Leojiard 

Uidj' Wash'n .... 

Leviathan 

Leeds 

Mexican 

*5fod.)u 

Manhattan 

Northern Belle .. 

•Ophir 

Overman 

Ra\nnond & Ely. 

Rye Patch 

•Savage 

Sierra Nevada ... 

'Silver Hill 

Seg Belcher 

Solid Silver 

Succor 

Silver King, Ar'a 
Silv. King South. 

*Tip-Top 

Union Con 

•Utah 

Yellow Jacket.. . 



li 11 



TiinDAT. Wrdxksdt Tiii'iuid't. I Pkidat. 

A.H. PH. P.M. LM. A.M. P.M. 1 A.1I. p. H. 



14j 14J 



12S 



nl 



Aeacssnicnts arc now due on the Stocks above marked thus * 



MARINE INTELIilGENCE. 



ARRIVALS AND CLEARANCES AT THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO, FOR 
THE WEEK ENDING AUGUST 2, 1878. 







ABKIVAIiS. 




DATK, 


VESSBL. 


MASTER. 


WHERE FROM. 


CONSIGSKES. 


J'ly 28 


Ship Thomas Bell 


Gruzclier... 


Hnngkonjr 


Parrott & Co 






Kidley 

Menmuir ... 


Hongkong, etc 
Melbourne ... 




.. 29 


Ship Knlomene 


Starr & Co 


.. 29 


Ship Thurland Castle.. 


Anderson... 


Melbourne . . . 


Dickson, De Wolf & Co. 


.. 29 


Ship Prince Frederick. 


Ciafeiie 


Bombay , 


Rodgers, Meyer & Co. 


.. 31 


Ship Alexander Yeates 


Dunham 


Bombay 


Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 


.. 31 


Soh'r Montana 


Jacobson . . . 


San Bias 


K. C. Eldridge. 


Aug 1 


Ship G«'.enbui^ 


Melchests'u. 


Greenock 


Forbes Brothers. 


.. 1 


Ship Wandering Jew. . 


Talpey 


Hoiigkonsr — 


Williams, Bianchard & Co. 


.. 1 


Ship Ringleader 


Bray 


Shanghai 


Wdbanis, Bianchard & Co 


.. 1 


Brig Chrietme 


Sebultze . . . 


Honolulu 


Williams, Bianchard & Co 



CLEABANCES. 



DATE. 


VESSEL. 


WASTER. 


WHERE BOrND. 


BY WHOM CLEARED. 


J'ly 29 


Ship Dallam Tower. .. . 


Davis 


Liverpool 


Starr & Co. 


.. 29 


BriEj: Equaekern 


Menard 


Guaymas 


Thanhauser & Co. 


.. 29 


Brig Mabel Young .... 


Crane 


Cork 


Dickson, De Wolf & Co. 


.. 30 


StVDakota 


Morse 


Victoria, etc.. 


Wdliams, Bianchard & Co. 


.. 31 


Ship New York 


Irwin 


Liverpool 


Dickson, DeWolf & Co. 


Aug 1 


St'r Belgic 


Mever 


Yokohama , . . 


0. & 0. S. S. Co. 




Ship Jabez Howes 


Got! 


Liverp<jol 


Parrott & Co. 




Brig Aelhelstan 


Bavley 


Queenstown . . 


Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 




Brig Shakspeare 














Rodgers, Meyer & Co. 
J. Pi net. 




Brig Paloma 


Nissen 


Tahiti 



tlVERMORE COtLEGE. 

Boarillugr and Day Schoul fur both sexes. Xcxt term be$;Ins 
JULY 29, 1878. For Catalogues address J, D. SMITH, Prinuipal, 

July 27. Livermore, Alameda county, California. 

SItVER KING NORTH MINING CO., 

i'inal Couoty, Arizona. 
Office: Room 36, No. 330 flue St. (Academy Biiililliis), H.r. 

WHITE & KUHL, irGTi^. 

Grain SacJkst, Wool Bagrs, Gunnies 

No. 316 CALIFORNIA STRKt-T, San Fran- 
June 15, 



Wilson White. 

Mercbnnflise Brokers. 
and Jute GooJs [feneraUy. 
Cisco, Cal. P. O. Box 2,113. 



Henry B. Williams. Henry P. Bianchard. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCH&RD & CO., 

SHIPPING ASTD Cwitl.HISNION ItlEKCU AKTS, 

No. 21? California st., S. F. [July 27. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



LETTER AND 

• 



Aug. 3, 1878. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Keeorded in the City and Connty of San Francisco. Californiat for the 
two Weeks ending July 30, 1878. 

Compiledfrom the Records of the Mercantile Afjejicy of John McKillop & (Jo. , 
. 401 California 8treeU San Francisco. 



Wednesday, July 24th. 



GRAMTOK AND OBANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Wni HoUis to Aunie K Botsford. 
W E Smith to L B Mastick 



Geo F Belden to Josf ah Belden .... 
D A McDonald to J F Hill 



E Valencia, 212 n 22d, n 2^x125 

Sw 9lh Av and J, w 175, b to n line of S 
S F Hd Tct, e to J, n r>3:9 to bcgin'ng 

Und 1-5 or S Bblks 3S, 3S 

Sc 2-2d and Sanchez, s 23, e 100, 8 225, e 
21:6, n 100, w 13:K, n 28, e 1", n 100. w 
125 to besinninsr 



$5,440 



1,200 
8,000 



Thnrsday, July 25th. 



M Morpenstein to Wm McKowu,. 
Jno Grant to Sav and Ln Society. 
Christina Hadlcr to Henry Hadlcr. 

U Ward et al to John Lloyd 

FLA Pioche et al to .las Nolan . . 
Bernard J Kenny to Eliza Kenny. 

Jacob Guester to Wm Hollis 

Eiiae Perkins to David Cabn 

J P Dameron to J W Moore 

Jbb a Dnffy to M C Bateman 



Hugh McGavey to Jae Ambrose 
Thos Somerset to L J Hardy, Jr. 



|Lot34, blk 14, Flint Tract HdAPS'n.,.. 

pe Brunnan, 412 sw 2d. sw 06:3x275 

iSe Natoma, 250 no 9th, ne 25x75 

[All property real and personal 

iLot 41, blk 55, City Land Association ,. 

E Mission. 95 8 19th, 8 30x122:6 

N J8tb, 19T;6e Misoion, e 23:6x92 

,Ne Pine and Franklin, n 68:9x110 

iSe Pacific and Mason, s 73, e 75:6, n 10:G 
e27:8. n 62:8. w 103:2 to bet;inninsr 

S Broadway, 137:6 «■ Gou2h, 8 137:6, w 
70, n 5:6. el5, nl31:S. e"60:2 to be?. .. 

Lots 13, 14, blk 15, Fairmount Tract.... 
IW Diamond, 1908 l9th,B55xl25 



$ 430 

14.000 

Gift 

"fl5 
50 



1 

350 

1,&00 



Friday, July 26th, 



H Hoiighklns to S Saywell , 

Geo W Ellis to J H Dousherty... , 

Enoch Lolt to J B Painter , 

SamI F Sinclair to T C Donnelly. 

Wm Hale to Laura Morton 

O Felt byAdm'r to EMcn Felt 

Hannah Colter to Jtilins C Reis.. 

Jos Davis to C L Ackerman 

Same to BD W Davis 



EAnnstelnto JODonnell.. 
Jae T Hoyt to A J Pope 



Joo Fitzpatrick to C S Bennedict. 



S 15tb av. 175 e Q, e 25x93:6 

S nth and Hiibbcii, pe 240x370 

Sw 25lh and Bryant, s 140x100 

W Mason, 70 e Green, s 67:6x110:6 

Nw Wpbsterand Wildey, w 106:3 xn27:6 

Und % sw cor Du:;nn Tract 

N Itith, 65 K Howard, e 32x1 10 

N Union, 112 w MontRomerv. n 68:9x25. 
Lot 30, blk 6. Mission and 30th Street 

Extension Homestead 

S Bullion, no w Lftf^iina, w 27:6x120 .. 
Nw Mission and 22d, n 112:9, pw 250, p 

59:5, e 125, s 36:10, e J25 to beginninjj. 
Und Vf, nw Hermann and Valencia, n 

72:6, w 56:1, nw 43:2, c g07:0i^ to bpg. 



$1,(.00 

10,000 

2,200 

10 

5 

2,400 

5,474 

1 

1 
5 

20,000 

18 



Saturday, July 27th. 



H S Hissins to G D Crocker 

SwHoIladiiy to C S Tilton 

G Demartine to Guisepe Dcmartne 

Geo R Adams to Jas Barret 

Jag Brown etal to E Frank 



H WGray to E O Deming , 

E A Stoddard to Jnlitis Jacobs. . 

Jas Kennedy to E B Eddy , 

F C Anderton to II L Williams.. 
A Boi-d to John Landers 



W Bryant, 140 s 2olh. s 47:6x100 

Nw Lacuna and Filbert, n 215x87.... 
Und ^' lots 5, S, 9. blk 21 ; lots 6, 7, blk 

21; lots ti, 7, 4, 8, 9, 10, blk 22, West 

End Map 1 

W Cook, 326 nPt Loboeav, n2.'>v]20.... 
E Scotland. 29:8 5^ s Montgomery Ave, s 

25, e45:oJ^. nw 32:6,V, w 24:8'a to beg 
N 14tb,140e Howard, e 20, n to a pt, w 

42:6, s243:7J^ to beginning 

W Jessie, 160 s 19tb, s 25x75 

Se Post and Gonirh. e 55x120 

Ne 6th av, 50 se R. ee 100x100 

Sw Band49lh av, w 225:10, 8 600:6,; and 

sundry lots in different parts of city. . 



$3,500 



5 
350 

175 

750 
1.000 
9.000 
14,000 

15,000 



Monday, July 29th. 



Wm J Black to Howard Black. . . 
Wm Hollis to Patrick Ratifran... 
Alice S Allen to Richard Sinnot. 
S F Sav Union to Tlioa Magee. . . 



IW Mission, 160n20tb, n 35x90 

NHill, 190 w Valencia, w 30x114 

E Hrtrtford,195 ii 19th, n 25x125 

Ne 5th av, 300 se B, se 75, ne 100. se 25, 

1 ne 100, nw 100, sw 200 to beginning.. 
Antonio Mietcnich to GMontanoroiUnd y^ n Greenwich, 81:4 w Stockton, w 

I 26:6x45:5 

B'rd T LComrs to Patk McGowaniS Harrieon, 142:6 e 5th. e 326x160 



Saml Lanpdon to Jno Mcliinnell. 
Geo H Christian to Jno C Hall... 
Epbraim Frank to J Hirsctifield. 

Mary Shea to Catherine Snllivan. 
Jae "O'Snllivan to Wm Rollins... 

Wm L Uhler to Ida De^ener 

Same to Lncy N Randolph 

P Burnesa to Mary G Geraghty... 



Jno Reardon to Apa FIsk 

Wm Rollins to H E U.-mpel 

Jno Center to Mury McSwiney.... 
S Brignardello to C S de Bernal. . . 
Same to Same 



Wm Girzckoweky to C Holjc 

Elijiih Case to Wm Girzfkowsky. . 

Mary J Welwh to T J Welsh 

Jus E Gordon to Mary A Edwards 



Jiipan av and Madrid, e 100x300 

NChiy, 175 w Polk, w 50xl27:S?Ti 

E Scotland, 2il:8'4 s Monl:.'omery Ave, p 
25. e 45:63^, nw 32:6>^, w 28i^i to beg 

Sw Scotland Pine, s 22:2x82:6 

Nw Sacra iienio and Scott, n 27:81ix81;3 

Ne Eddy and Lugnna. e 46x120 

N Eddv. 112:6 e La-.'una, e 25x 120 

N 22d, 90 e Valencia, e 35, n 60:10, w 35:1 
s 58:6 to b(*ginniiig 

N Geary, 1(»5 e Lyon, e 27:6x137:6 

Nw Scott and Sacramento, n 27:8^x81:2 

E Shoiwell, 137:6 n 2:id. n 30x122:6 

S<Greenwicb. 60 w Taylor, w 30x90 

Und X e Sansome, 45:10 n Jackpon, n 
22:11x1-37:6; und und S-lOtha e San- 
some, 68:9 n Jackpon, n 22:11x137:6... 

Lots 2, 23, blk 3:3, Case Tract 

Slime 

\VCapp,35 8]9th,s .30x104:6 WW 

Se Sanchez and Jersey, s 114x175 



$3,000 

4,053 

525 

250 

100 

20 

600 

9,000 

500 
Gilt 
4,000 
7.100 
3,125 

4,000 
1 
4,200 
1,.500 
1,600 



5,850 
Gift 

1.200 
1.650 

8.600 



Tuesday, July 30th. 



Jno Pforr to F Hellenschmidt 

Jos Lftwler to John Plnrr 

JosLawlcrto F Uellcnschmidt .. 

John Pforr to Jus Lawler 

G K PorUr to Mark L McDonald. 
M L McDonald to AUred J Fritz. , 
Robt J Tobiu to Annie Sempter. . 



JnoB'ackloTiilly R Wise 

Ugenin R Giiylord to W U Gaylord 



Jno M Moore to Jas Regan . 



W Potrero av, 304 8 20th, s 10:6x200.... 

394 " b3:1x200 

** 294 " 8 6x200 

" 410:6 " 8 16:6x200 

N 13th, 270 w Valencia, w 50x160 

Same 

N Greenwich. 2a e Baker, e 50, n ia3, nw 

lo a pt 8 112 to beginning 

Sw Brannan pi, 200 se Brannan, se 75x60 
Nw Island 23d av. w 87:6x1 OU 



John Huiton to City und County 

Leopo'd Englunder loM Siillivitn. 

S W HoMaday to Frank M Pixley 

Wm Uule lo Ellen Clark 

Denni.s Qiiiniun to II Q'linLn... 



...l-^ll inlerept in M B71 . 



Jno Fi:'bi;rto M Pctertuu., 



Streets in Western Addition 

E More pi, 9:3:li n Pacific, n 22x58:9 

Se Fillmore and Francisco, e l;i7;6xi;J7;6 
Lots i:34(l. l.-m, 1.312 Gift Map No 3.... 
N Bush, 87:6 w Polk, w 33;7^'<xl20. 



..!W Iowa, 20On Yuba, n 25x100... 



750 
1 
50 



6 
Girt 

200 



STOCK BROKERS. 



E. S. Latham. LATH&M & KING, Homer S. Kid^. 

Snccesjiors to James H. I^atliam Ar Co., No. 313 Pine street. 
Stock and Money Brokers. Stocks bou^'ht and carried on margins. July 13. 

Daniel Z. Yost.] fJ. W. Breckixridqe, Member S. F. Board. 

BRECKINRIDGE & YOST, 

Stock Brokers, 304 illoiitgroinery St. [March 16. 

Sherwood Callagoas.] [Jeremiah Lyncb. 

CAttAGHAN, LYNCH & CO., 

Stock Brokers. Ko. 509 California Street, San Prancisco. 

[April 27.1 



Geo. C. Hickox. 



E. C. McFarlanb. 



GEORGE C. HICKOX & CO., 

ClomtnlssJon Stork Brokers (San Francisco Stock Ex- 
/ cbange. No. 230 Montgomery street, San Francisco. May 4. 



J. M. Walkee. 



Jennings S. Cos. 



Alexander Austin. 



S' 



J. M. WALKER & CO., 



toch Brokers, Northwest corner Moutg'omcry and Pine 

streets, San Francisco. March 30. 



B. Boswell. S. B. BOSWELL & CO., D. 0. Bates. 

took Brokers, No. 318 California street, San Francisco, 

California March 30. 



S' 



THOMAS BOYSON, M. D., 

{XTniversity of Copenliaeeii, Denmark), 

Physician nnU Sure:eon. OOice and Residence, 112 Kearny 
_ street. Office Hours, 11 a.m, to 1 p.m., and 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, 11 to 1 only. 



Telephone in the otSce. 



July 13. 



DR. HALPRUNER, 

SURGEON CHIROPODIST. 

Cnres Corns, Bunions, Ingrowing' Nails, etc. No pay re- 
quired until cured. Ami without pain or lameness. E,\araination and Con- 
sultation Free. Mrs. H. will assist treating- ladies. Office Hours: From 1 p.m. to 
6 P.M., and 7 to 9 p.m. ; Sunday, 11 to 1 p.m. ST JAMES HOUSE, 

March 23. 906 Market street, corner Ellis and Stockton. 

CHARLES E. HOLBROOK, M. 0., 

Offlca and Besidence: St. James House, 9J6 Uarkst Street. 
[March 23.] 

DR. D. A. HILLER-S 

Homeopathic Free Dispensary to tlie Poor, No. 12 Bag-ley 
Place, off O'Farrell street, next Hammaoi Bathd. Feb. 10, 



TO DENTISTS PHYSICIANS AND ARTISTS. 

Offices to Rent. --Those desirable frout rooms ou first floor 
NUCLEUS HOUSE, faciiig Market, Third and Kearny streets. Aijiilv to 
June 8. MRS. E. R. VVORTII. 

DR. O'TOOLE'S OFFICES 

Are moveil from »06 Market street to California Savlnffs 
Bank Buildinj,', corner Market, Powell and Eddy streets. Entrance on Eddy 
street, J uly 13. 

Geo. gcMtz. SCHULTZ & VON BARGEN. H YonBargen. 

Importers and Dealers in M'ines, Brautlies, Bonrbon Whis- 
kies, and all kinds of Foreifjn and Domestic Liquors, southeast corner California 
and Front streets, San Francisco. April 13. 



J. C. MERRILL & CO., 

Shipping- and Commission Merchants, Agents for the Saiid- 
wich Islands Packe t Lines, 20* California street, S. F. April 13. 

L. H. Newton. NEWTONBROTHERSl^ CO., MTlfe^ton, 

Importers and wliolesale dealers in Teas, Forelsn Goods and 
Groceries, 204 and 200 California street, San Francisco, Cal. May 25. 



Geo. Howes, GEO. HOWES & CO., Jabez Howes. 

Cjan Francisco, Calirornl», Siilpplug and Commission Mcr- 

tP ™i-n's. J"'' .'J^l'i.'sof Sutton & Oo.'s ■■ Dispatch " Line ot Clipper Ships from 
Mew York and Philadelphia. jjay ^^ 

D. F. HUTCHIKQS; M. DraSE. J. SiKDM^. 

PHENIX OIL WORKS. 

i*\wi''ll',*'v**''.";""**"'Pn'V"* * *^"' **" ""O Commission 

I Merchants. Maniitaotnrers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Urd, Machinery and 
lUummating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

Newton Booth, 0. T. Wheelbr, Sacramento. | J. T. Glovfr, W. W. Dddoe, S. F 



E' 



W 



W. W. DODGE & CO. 



holesale Grocers, corner Front and Clay streets, San 

^"'""°''- April 1. 

ASHTON'S LIVERPOOL SALT. 

This celebrated branii of Salt bas been in constant nse for 
more than half a centurj' in the Eastern States, where for dairy purposes it 
commands double the price ot any other hrand of Liverpool Salt. The undereiirned 
ure solo agents here, and offer it to the trade. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARU & CO 
'^'"'- °- 213 California street. 



COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

R* "i","*,'?" »"»••■<««: Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
1 I, UT^A^I;,"■S°^^°,'"'"'*,'""■!"'J.™'•'"■ 'he works ot the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LH HI CU.MI'ANY, Howard and First streets, and toot ot Second St. Jan. 12. 



H. S. Crocker, 



H. S. CROCKER & CO., 



John D. Tost. 



S'lfYands*'" ""'" *'""'"**™' ""■'" 40Jl-*0S Sansome street. San 



March 9. 



Aug. 3, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



17 



A FEW OF THS UEHBEBfe 

OF THE 8. F. STOCK 

LSD EXCUAMGB 

BOABD. 

K P. PK«'KIIAM- Preii 

II. I.. IIII.L- • • V. I*r«>«. 

B. 11. rolT «'hniruinu. 

J. n. KII4»TWi:i.i,-Tr4>M. 

JON. L. U15tV Mer'J-. 

Aostin, Alexander, or J. M. 

WttlkorA Co aosMonts'y. 

Brown. J. W 4i5Cara. 

Barling A Bro. 405Caltfonila. 
BosweU* Co., 8. B...318 Cal'a. 

Cabin, E ■***> MoDigomory. 

Coleman, Jas- V -laiCalironilft. 

Greenebaum. J Mouts'y at. 

Hall, Ed. F 410 CalifoniU. 

Jones.J.H S!0 IMdc. 

King, Joe. Ii I*iue strceL 

Noble, H. H....'t35 California. 

Noal.Chas. 8 330Mon(s'y. 

Peckham.E. P....8n Montg'y. 

PaterBon, Jaa 313 Cal'a. 

Shotwell.J.M 311 Montg. 

Scott, H. H...307 Motncomery. 
Wakeaeld, 8. B 3X4 Pine. 



A FEW OF THE MEMBERS 

OF THE PACIFIC STOCK 

EXCHANGE BOABD. 

C. I.. WELLER - - Pres, 
B.CJAKDINEB-T. Pres. 
A. J. MOri*l>ER-S«c'y. 
JOS.TII^DEN-Chnlr'n. 
T. WBi ITEtY - - - Treas. 
IV.T.ATWOOD-A.Scc. 

Bourne, J. B. . llfiHalleckst. 
Baird, Andrew-. 304 California 
Dodge, George S. .Nevada BIk. 
Height, Ira G. 12 Stevenson B. 

Hunt & Coates 318 Cal'a. 

Marka, Joseph .... 228 Monipy. 
Martin, M. S.... 307 California. 

Neal, Charles 8 339 Montg. 

Taylor, A. C 415 Montg'y. 

Tyng, Geo... 309 California et., 
Rooms 8-9. 



FOREIGN POSTAGE. 

The firat column denotes the 
postage on letters and the last 
column the postage on newspa- 
pers, in cents : 

Australia, via England.. ..15 4 

Australia, via San Fran'co.. 5 2 

Austria 5 2 

Brazil, via England.... 21 4 

British Columbia 3 1 

Canada 3 1 

Chile, Brit'h mail, via Colon.17 4 

China, via England 15 4 

China, via San Francisco. ..10 4 

East Indies, via S, Fran'cc.lO 4 

France, s'ia Eng., prepaid. .. 5 2 

German States, preiKiid ... 5 2 
Great Britain, half ounce... 5 -2 

Havana direct « 5 2 

Japan 5 2 

Mauritius 10 4 

Mexico direct 10 1 

N. Zealand, via South pton. 15 4 

N. Zealand, via Brindisi 10 6 

N. S. W., via England 15 4 

N. S. W., viaSanFran'co..l2 2 

Panama 5 2 

Peru, British m'l, via Colon.17 4 

Prussia direct 5 2 

Russia direct 5 2 

Spain 5 2 

Sandwich Islands 6 2 

West Indies direct 5 ?■ 

Postage should be prepaid. 



THE NEWS LB'i-TEB'8 
HOTEt DIRECTORT 

Throaghoat Europe. America 

Etc., Etc. 
Note, — The News Lvttbr i» 

KKurUAHLT MAILBDTU KACB 
UuTBL IN THIS LIST. 

Athens.- Hoiol d'AoBleterro. 

BAKBAl>OKtl,W. L-AlblOD HOtOl. 

Bbhun.— Hotel Koyal, Unter 
doll Linden, No. 3. 

Baukn-Uadkn.— Hotel de Bel* 
landu. 

WEiKnAURN.— Hotel Rose. 

Munich.— Hotel BcUevne. 

DiiESDBS.— Victoria Hotel. 

Vienna.— (irand Hotel. Grand 
National Hotel. Grand Ili>- 
Icl dc la Cour d'Aulriche. 
Hotel Kitiaerin Ell7.abutb. 

Geneva. — Grand Hotel dc la 
Paix. Hotel Bean Riva^. 

Paris.— Hotel Menrlce, 228 Rne 
de Rivoli. Grand Hotel de 
Louvre, Hotel London. 

BotJLO<»NEt?UH-MBR,FRAMCE. - 

Hotel 1)08 Bains. 
Bordeaux. — Grand Hotel de 

France. 
Marseilles. — Grand Hotel de 

Marseille. 
Lyons.— Hotel de TEarope. 
Nice.— Grand Hotel Chaavaln. 
Buutus ELS .—Hotel de Europe. 
OsTESD.— Bath Hotel. 
The Hague.— Hotel Paalez. 
Genoa.— Great Hotel of ItaJy 

and Crof s of Malta. 

Hotel de la Vllle. 
Turin. -Grand Hotel Trombetta 
Milan.— Hotel de la Ville, 

Hotel Pozzo. 
CoMC— Hotel de la Eeined'An- 

ck'tcrre. 
Flo BEN CB.— Hotel New York. 
VENicE.-Uanieli'e Royal B..^,.. 

Hotel Victoria. 
Leghorn. — Victoria and Wash- 
ington Hotel. 
Rome.— Hotci d'Allemasme. 
Naples.— Washington Hotel. 
Palermo.- Hotel Central. 
Cordova.- Fonda Sniza. 
SEviLLE.--Fonda de Paris. 
St. Petersburoh. —Hotel De 

mutb. 
Moscow.- Sclavonic Bazaar. 

St. Nicholas Hotel. 
Constantinople.— Hotel d'Au- 

glelerre. 
London.— Bridge House Hotel. 

London B. 
LanghaiD Hotel, Portland PI. 
Morlcy'i' Hotel, Trafalgar Sq. 
Leamington.— Regent Hotel. 
Liverpool. "Washington Hotel, 

Lime street. 
NoTTiNonAM.- Maypole Hotel. 
Birminriiam.— The Great West- 
em Hotel, Snow Hill Station. 
The Hen and Chickens Hotel. 
The Stork Family Hotel and 
Posting House, Old Square. 
Sheptield.— Royal Hotel. 
St.-Lawrence-on-Sea, Rams- 

gate.— The Granville Hotel. 
Pltmodth.— Duke of Cornwall 

Hotel. 
Chepstow.— Beaufort Arras Ho' 

tel. (Tintem Abbey, 5 miles.) 
Dublin.- The Hihemian Hotel. 

Shelbonrne Hotel. 
Edinburgu.— Douglas Hotel. 

The Balmoral Hotel. 
Glasgow.— Queen's Hotel. 
Cork.— Imperial Hotel. 
KiLLARNEr. — Royal Victoria 

Hotc». 
Montreal.— Ottawa Hotel. S. 

C. Brown. manatreT. 
Ottawa. — Russell House. 
Toronto.— The Qaeen's Hotel, 

Front street. Rossia House, 

E. P. Shear, Proprietor. 
Qfebec. — ^jtadacona Hotel, 
Halifax.— White Swan Hotel. 
Washington. D. C— Arlington 

House, Imperial Hotel, Eb- 

bitt House. 
Baltimobb.— Carrolton House. 
New Yori:.— ** Tbe WindBor." 
Vera Cru?.— La Casa de Dili- 

geuciae. 
Mexico. — Hotel Itnrbide. 
GuADALAJAftA. — Hotel Hidalgo. 
Mazatlan.— Itorbide Hotel. 
Lima.— Maury's Hotel, Calle de 

Bodcgonea. 
Vii-PABAiso.-Hotel Roma, Calle 

de Cochrane. 
Santiago de Chile.- Banosde 

Colima, Hotel Santiago. 
Rio de Jan.— Cafe Americano. 
Sydney.— Royal Hyde Park Ho. 
Melbourne.— .Albion Hotel. 
Cape of Good MoPB.-Port Eliz- 
abeth, Phff^ii Hotel. 
TAniTi.— Faa, riotel de Pane. 
Japan.— Y3ddo, Yeddo Hotel. 
Honolulu.— Hawaiian Hotel. 



THE NEWS LETTBB 

(B rollWAHUKD, tMtlU*AlD.BVBBl 
SaTI'KOAV.TO TUB KOLLOWlNd 
A l)l>K BRH Ktl A.M> PlACBH OF 
Dl'ttlMKHAUXMUKTTUKUt'OUOUT 
THB Woklh:— 
Adelaide— C h a m b c r of Com* 

mcrce. 
Amsterdam— Hope & Co. 
Aniverp— La Bourec. 
Aloxanaria— ZUinia Freree. 
Aackland— Chamber of Com- 

racrco: Upton Bros. 
Aberdoea — C h a m b e r of Com- 
merce, 
Arizona— A. J. Flnlay; Mart Me- 

loney, J S. MansUeld. 
Berlin — Mercbauu Exchange ; 

Taylor i: Co. 
Bait uD ore — Ualtintorc Republican 

MiTchauts' Exchange. 
Boston- Merchante" Exchange. 
Bordeaux— J. Lauazeinth & Fil«; 
Barton & Guestier; Pierre 
Schroder & Co. 
Birmmgham — Chamber of Com- 
merce. 
Bombay— Commercial Bank of 
India; Chamber of Commerce. 
Batavia— Commercial Society ; 
Martin, Dyce & Co; Diunmler 
-iCo. 
Buenos Ayres— Chamber of Com- 
merce; Zimmerman, Fair& Co. 
Bristol— Commercial lioomi. 
Belfast— Commercial Exchange. 
British Columbia — The Governor 

of British Columbia. 
Oanton— J ardine, M atheson & Co 
Oonstantinople— Baltozzi FrercB , 

Jacqucsi, Alleon & Co. 
Oape of Good Hope— Commercial 

Itcading Rooms. 

Oalcutta- Chamber Commerce; 

Commercial Bant of India ; 

Whitney Brothers & Co. 

Oallao— English Reading Room. 

Uopenhagen — Royal Exchange ; 

Boersen. 
Oolombo— Chaa. Shand & Co. 
Dunedin— Chamber Commerce. 
Dublin— Cummrjcial Building. 
Edinburgh- Chamber Commerce 

and Manufacturers. 
Frankfort— N. M. Rothschild & 
Sons, F, Livingstone; L. Liv- 
ingstone. 
Glasgow — Chamber Commerce 

and Manufacturers. 
Gibraltar- Turner & Co. 
Hamburg— Lutterroth & Co.; H, 
J. Merck & Co.; Carl Heine 
Boreenballe. 
Havre— Quesnd Preree et Cie; 
Wanner, Langer & Co; C Du- 
bois & Co; Banque Commer- 
ciftle. 
Honolulu — Wilcox, Richards & 
Co; Aldricb, Walker & Co; H 
M. Whitney. 
Havana— Crawford, Esq ; H. B. 

M.'s Consul. 
Jamaica— Middleton & Co. 
Jersey, England — Commercial 

Reading Rooms. 
London— Chairman of London 
Stock Exchange; Lloyds; Gov- 
ernor of the Bank of England; 
Gunn & Co; Rothschilds; Bank 
of London; Baring,Bros &Co; 
Dclizy, Davies & Co; "Public 
Opinion," "Graphic," "Court 
Journal,''' newspapers; Pri- 
vate Secretary of Queen Victo- 
ria ; Gov. Stock Investment 
Co., 33 Cornbill. 
Lima— William Gibbs & Co; Al- 
Bop & Co; Huth, Gi'unning 4 
Co; Bates, Stokes & Co; Gra- 
ham, Rowe & Co ; Fanner & 
Company. 
Liverpool— Chair-Lei Co iimerce; 
E.Kendall; LiverpooK eneral 
Brokers' Association. 
Leeds— Chamber of Commerce: 

Cloth Hall. 
Lisbon— Unias Commercial. 
Madrid— Francisco de P. Retor- 
tillo ; Escellentiesimo Don 
Jose de Salamanca. 
Mexico— Barron, Forbes & Co; 

Theodore La Cadie & Co. 
Marseilles— Pspcal, Fillie & Co; 

Roun de Fraissint. 
Manchester — Chamber of Com. 
Melbourne — Jamei* Denty & Co; 
Chamber of Commerce; Grice, 
Sumner & Co;McCuUoch :yCo 
Madras— Binney & Co ; Cham- 
ber of Commerce; C. Shand 
&Co. 
Mauritius— James Leischman & 
Co; Chamber of Commerce,. 
Montreal— St. .Tames' Club. 
Manila — Martin, Dyce & Co: 
Peele, Hubbell & Co ; RueBell 
ASturgis; Patterson, Morgan 
& Co. 
Mazatlan— Kelly MvTt.le & Co. 
New York— Chamber Commerce; 
Aster House ; "The Wind- 
sor ;" St. Nicholas Hotel : 
Fifth Avenue Hotel, James 
R. Keene. 



Naaun (New Providonco)— H. 

Addcrly JSt, Co. 
Nevada— K. Bueplc, ngout, Vir. 

L'lrila City; \V. GocKliuun, 

rlrche. 
Opono— Banco Allanca. 
Odoaw-itafalowich A Co; C. 

Zucberbecker At Co. 
OroEon — Uenrv Boyd. 
Pans — Chjirli-i* Li Guy. 
roini do vv»^« — James BIaoIc. 
Panama— Francisco Alvarez. 
Rio Janeiro- Wright. Maxwell & 

Co; Commercial Kxchunge. 
St. Petorsburgh— Steiglitz & Co. 
Singapore— hrtwyon & Co; Mar- 
tin, Dyce & Co; Chamber ol 

Commerce. 
Sydney— Chamber of Commerce, 

Robert Town & Co; Gilchrist, 

Watt & Co. 
Southampton— Royal Mall S. S. 

Company. 
Shanghai— p. M. S. S. Co. 
Toronto— The Bank of Britleh 

North America. 
Vienna— M. L. Biedcrman & Co; 

S. H. Stamuiz & Co. 
Valparaiso— Cross & Co; Alsop 

& Co • Wm. Gibbs & Co; 

Huth, Gruning & Co; Graham, 

Rowe & Co. 
Vera Oruz— British Consul. 
Victoria (V. I.)— Bank of British 

Columbia . 
Victoria (Hongkong) — Bosman & 

Co; Jardine, Mathison & Co; 

Dent & Co; Russell & Co; 

Auguttine Heard & Co; Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 
Washington (D. C.)— Willard'e 

Hotel, 
fokohania — Jardine, Mathison 

& Co; Commercial Sank of 

India. 



CONSTTLAR CORPS. 

Abghntink Kepublio— Consul— 

Chafi. Bauni.OlO Batlerv street. 
AusTKo- Hungarian Eaipibk — 

Acting OfBcer, A. Rosenthal, 3:^1 

Buttery. 
Beloiuji — Consul General — S. 

Morhange, Grand Hotel. Con- 
sul. E.Oriear.N, W. cor.Fifth 

and Townsend sts. 
Bolivia— Consol—F. Herrera.SSJ 

Montgomery street. 
CuiLi- Consul General — P. Se- 

Kundo Casauueva, U. S. Court 

Building. 
CosTA Rica- Consul General— 

T. Lemmeu Meyer, S.W. corner 

Fron^and Jsickson. Consul— 

Maria Sinow. 323 Front st. 
Denmakk— Consul— N. Soanioh- 

aen. 315 California street, 
Ecuador— Acting C o n s u 1— F. 

Hcrrera,3;ii Montgomery st. 
Fbance —Consul G-^neral— Mon. 

Antoine Frost, 70t Wash'n et. 
Gbhat Britain— W. L.Booker, 

Consul. Charles Mason Vlee- 

Consul. 
Gttatsmala- Consnl-General- 

Wm. Koch. 123 Cal'a st. 
German Empire— Conpul-Gpu.— 

Adolph Rosenthal, 321 Pattery. 
Greece— Consul— Enille \. Sui- 
ter, S. W. cor. Woutg & Comc'l. 
Hawaiian Islands — Consul — 

Henry W. Severance. 4nf) Front. 
HoNDURAS-Consul — Vacant. 
Italy— Consul-Count D. Barri- 

les. Front and Jackson. 
Japan — Consul — KentaroYann^ 

Eia, S.E. cor 3rd A Mark^f.. 
MKXico-MiRuei G. Pritchard 

Acting ConSQl. 216 Sansome. 
Netherlands- Consul — .J. De 

Fremery , i 10 Sansome street. 
NiovRAGUA — Consul-General — 

F. Herrera. 3."i Montgomery st. 
PKRU—Consnl General— K. de la 

Fuente y Subirat, ,510 Battery, 
PoBTDQAL— Consul— Francis Bcr- 

ion Vice Consul— H. Laidley, 

527 Clay st. - , „ 

KuasiA — Coneul Imoennl — M. 

Vladimir de Weletsky, 7 South 

Spain— Consul — Camllo Martin, 

London and S. F.Bank. 
San Salvador- Consul, vacant. 
Sweden and Norway— Consul, 

Augustus Bereeren, 4r6Montg>'. 
Switzerland — Consul— Francis 

Eerlon, 527 Clay. Vice-Consul, 

Antoine Borel. liOl Monte'y st. 
TuBKEY— Consul- Geo. W olbbe. 

SSFremontstrect. 
U S OF i.:oLOMBrA— Conenl- P. 

Herrara, 331 Mnntg'y st. 
VENKznrxA — <;r>iihiii Ricardo 

Morales. 10 Cali forma strewi 



BARKS & COHPAHIES 
Oonneotea with the Far East. 

TUE NbWM 1.KTTKK IS RKOCLAn 

LY MAlLKti TO ALLOK TUK FOL- 
LOWING OOMI'A.NIKS: 

I'enltinulnr and OrU-iitnl Htcam 
NavlKHtlon Co., V^ LvruleutiuM 
KtretH : M<-»niiKrrlrH Marlllmct 
(litiad otik-f In I'ltrlH), i<; ('nnuun 
street; Ni-tlitTlandi^ Indtu Stuum 
NuvlKiitUm Co., \.i AuhUnrrliira; 
HonKkonK and (liliiu Guh i'.vm- 
(tany, 11 Old Jewry ('liiinthcrn, 
J.C. Wtilduck, Secretiiry; SliiKa- 

rtore ViiiH Co., 8 St. Mary Axe, 
Cobert Kbiij, Secretary; I'aclHc 
Saw Mills, llakodaill, ArnilHtcad 
& Co. ngeiits.'Jl Old Broad htroet; 
Slngniiore Patent aWp and Dock 
Co., Paterson.SUnouH A; Cu.ttK'ts, 
■i\ St. Swlthln'8 Lane: SlUKap'Te 
Johore Steam Saw Mills Co., Pa- 
teraon, Simons & Co, ngcntn.21 
St. Swithln'fl Lane; Amoy Dock 
Co., John Pook, agent. LIme-st. 
Square; Hongkont;and Wliainpon 
Dock, Morrison &. Co. agente. 
Crown-court, Phtlpot Lane: N. 
China Insurance Co.,-'S Cornlilll, 
J. S. Mucklntosh, Secretary; Can- 
ton Insurance Co., Matbcson & 
Co. agents, 3 Lombard St.; Union 
Insurance Co. ol Canton. Dent, 
Palmer & Co. aKent8,KlnK'» Arms 
Yard, Moorgate street ; Hong- 
kong Insurance Co., Glctlstanea 
& Co. accnts, 26 Austlnfriars ; 
China Traders Insurance Co. 
Hongkong, Fcaron & Co. atfcnta, 
M Great St. Helens; China and 
Jar an Marine Insurance Co. Rob 
en Benson & ('o. ag'ts, i>0 King's 
Arms Yard, Moorgate St.; Ceylon 
Co., Palmerston Bnlldmgs, Old 
Broad St., R. A. Cameron. Scc'y ; 
Borneo Co. 7 Mincing Lane, Wm. 
Martin, Manager; Tahjong ragnr 
Dock Co. (limited) of Singapore, 
Mactaggnrt, TUIman & Co. ag'ls, 
34 Great St. Helens. Banks.- 
Agra Bank, 28 Nicholas Lhug, 
Lombard street, J. Thompson. 
Chairman; Chartered Bank ol 
India, Australia, and Chlua, Qnt- 
ton Court, Threadneedic street, 
J. H. Gwythcr, Manager; Char- 
tered Mercantile Bunk of India, 
London, and China, Old Broad 
street, D. T. Robertson, General 
Manager; Comptolr d'Escompte 
de Paris, 144 Leadenliall street. 
Deutsche Bank, "Actlcn Gesell- 
Bchaft" of Berlin, agencies, Na- 
Clonal Provincial Bank of En- 
gland, lia Blshopsgate street, 
within; German Bank of London, 
Bartholomew Lane, Lothbury ; 
Bank of Rotterdam, Union Bank 
of London, agents. Princess st.; 
Hongkong and Slianghfll Banking 
Corporation, W. H. Vacher, Man- 
ager, 33 Lombard street; Nation- 
af Bank of India, R. 0. Sawers, 
Chief Manager, SO King William 
street; Oriental Bank Corpora- 
tion. Threndneedle street, G J.F. 
Stuart, Chief Mnnnger. 

LOCATION CITY ANb CO. 
P0BLIC Of FICE8 

County— New City Hall. 

Probate— New City Hall. 

Nineteenth Dist — New City H. 

City andCo. At'y— Xew City ti. 

Grand Jury Rooms— New Cit. H 

Mayor— New City Hall. 

B'DOF SuPERV'RS— New City P. 

Cl'kB'd Supkbv'kb- New City H 

Tax Collkctoe— New City Hall. 

AssKBSOR- New City Hall. 

B'd of Education- New City H. 

SUPT. Pub. Schools— NewCity H. 

Auditor— New City Hall. 

Trkasurer — New Cttv Hnll. 

Hall of Records- New City H. 

License Col'ctoe— New City H. 

Industb'l School- New CltyH. 

PolickCourt- O d Cii\ Hall. 

Justices— Old City Hall. 

Fourth District— Old City Halt. 

Twelfth Dist't- O d CltyHrll. 

Municipal Court of Appeals— 
Old City Hnll. 

District At'ney — Old City H. 

PoliceAtt'rney— Old City Hall. 

SnEBiFF-OId City Hall. 

SuPT. op Streets— Old CltyH'l. 

County Clebk— Old City Hall. 

Station House- Old City Hall. 

Fire Department- Old City H. 

Surveyor- O d City Ha 1. 

Chief of Police— d City Ball. 

Twenty- THIRD District — Me- 
chanics irstltutc Building. 

Fifteenth Dist--S Alon'. Av. 

Pftjlio AdminirtratoB— No. 309 
Montgomery street. 

City PHYsiciAN-r'H Kenrny st. 

Coroner- 16 0'Farrell street. 

Custom HousK—Battery street. 

Collector of Internal Reve- 
nue— Old Merchant?' Exch'ngc. 

AsBESsoB Internal. Revknue— 
Hayward'B Buil'llng. 

Post Office — "Washington and 
Battery streets. 

Corporation Yard— Fibe— Pac- 
rampnio strert, near Drumm. 

COBPORATION YAED — STREETS— 
Folsom St., opp. Stewart. 

Hospital— PoLieru Av. between 
22d and JSd street. 

Market Inspector— 124 Geary. 

Park Commissioners— St)2 Mont- 
gomery street. 

Fire Alarm and Police Tele 
graph— Brenham Place. 

Health office- f-'t Geary st. 

Pound Feepeb — Califomia and 
Walnut streets. 

QUABAKTiNK-502 Eiittery street. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 



LETTER 

M — =r 



AND 



Aug. 3, 1878. 



THE SILVER DOLLAR ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 

■When the San Francisco Miut commenced turninj; out standard 
silver dollars, the bankers and business men of this city were a little ap- 
prehensive of the result. It was feared that the introduction of such 
lanre additions to the silver currency would still further depress its value, 
and add to the inconvenience and losses resaltiny from depredated sub- 
sidiary coins. The Clearin;:: House Association delayed action, but it 
was contemplated to refuse deposits at the banks of standard dollars, ex- 
cept to be repaid in kind. 

The Mint has now been turning out the new dollars for some months, 
and we can fairly understand the part which this currency is to play. In 
the first place, the standard dollar has not come into ceneral circulation 
at all, showing that all fears as to its effect on the subsidiary silver were 
not well grounded. It has not gone into the banks simply because the 
Government has provided a place uf deposit— the Sub-Treasury. The cer- 
tificates issued to the depositor are a convenient and desirable form of cur- 
rency. They represent at least so much bullion that is held for their re- 
demption. If the silver dollar is only worth 85 or 90 cents in gold, the 
silver certificate is worth at least that price, come what may. Neither 
stringency of the money market, nor even a panic, can affect its value in 
the least degree. The notes of our gold banks have to protect them only 
as a reserve of 25 cents in specie on each dollar. The ordinary National 
Banks have no reserve whatever in specie, nor is it in contemplation on 
the resumption of specie ^)ayments, to ever compel them to hold over 33 
per cent, of their note liabilities in coin. Practical men, not befogged by 
the cvurent financial fallacies of the day, will prefer a piece of paper 
which is protected by silver bullion worth 85 or 90 cents to one which 
only in name represents 25 or 33 cents in gold coin. 

These certificates have played a very important part in our financial 
affairs on the Pacific coast. They are wanted East at par, or mther a 
fraction of it, and can be sent by mail at small cost. They have, there- 
fore, taken the place of coin in settling the balances due by merchants and 
bankers here to New York and Chicago. In place of paying for the goods 
purchased on the other side of the Rocky Mountains with the more 
precious metal and bearing the cost of its transportation, we utilize the 
silver for that purpose, and we can afford to spare our entire product of 
this metal. 

The result of this will be a steady accumulation of gold in our bank 
vaults, and we shall be guarded against any drain of it on the resumption 
of specie payments east of the Rocky Mountains. Our merchants actu- 
ally go to the Sub Tre-^sury and exchange gold for the standard silver 
dollar, so much derided by the press. The gold remains here, tbe silver 
remains here, and the certificate of deposit of the latter goes East, with- 
out material cost of transportation. 

During July the shijiments of treasure overland by Wells. Eargo & Co. 
were only §334,572. against over -51,000,000 in June. The China exports 
have also fallen off, so that the total exports for last month were limited 
to SS9G,083 49, against 67.171.019 in July, 1877, and S2,579,.507 in July, 
1876. There is, perhayjs, now more treasure in San Francisco than at any 
time in its history. The Nevada Bank alone holds over 810,000,000. The 
silver dollar and the silver certificate have proven a blessing to San Fran- 
cisco, and will be in the future regarded quite differently from wliat they 
were when the silver bill went into operation. Tbe Pacific coast certainly 
has no reason to be dissatisfied with the labors of Senator Jones in pass- 
ing the silver bill, and we think that public sentiment to- day 'accords to 
him due praise for a broad comprehension of the situation, and an earnest 
desire to further the interests of the Pacific slope, 

THE CROF IN TULARE COUNTY. 
That portion of Tulare county known as the Mussel Slough precinct, 
has, since threshing commenced, shown some remarkable results in the 
production of wheat. In some instances the yield has been over forty- 
five busheh to the acre, and where it has fallen as low as twenty-five 
bushels, it was for the reason that the gi-ain being down and lodged it 
could not be harvested. Those who have examined the crop of that sec- 
tion for this season, as far as it has come into the market, pronounce it 
very fine. The little rust that appeared did no harm to speak of, and but 
little is shrunk. The wheat buyers of Hanford, Lemore, and Grangeville 
have been paying from SI 20 to SI 31 per cental, delivered at the R. R. 
station, and appear well satisfied with their purchases at those figures. 
With the means at hand it will be impossible to thrash the entire crop 
before October, hence the actual amount produced cannot be had before 
that time; but the knowing ones predict that Mussel Slough will produce 
this year more wheat to the acre than any other portion of the State. Of 
course *he farmers there are jubilant. They will be able to recover from 
the effects of the last dry season, their debts to the country storekeeper 
will be wiped out, and they will be free to go on with their good work 
with no mill-stone around their necks to clog their energy and enterprise. 
Already they have in their second crops, and as the earth is still moist, 
by reason of thorough irrigation, the yield of corn and potatoes will no 
doubt add largely to th is year's profits. When the existing troubles be- 
tween the R. R. Co. and the settlei-s ^re settled, we look for a most pros- 
perous condition of affairs along the line of the Goshen branch of the 
S. P. R. R., and we trust, for the interest of all concerned, that all diffi- 
culty will so(m be ended, and that the farmers located on the odd sections 
will have no reason to complain at their situation. 

LATEST FROM CHINESE AND JAPANESE PAPERS. 

Regular communication between Kobe, Yokohama and Hakodate is 
about to be established. 

General Grant and family and Admiral Patterson, Commanding the 
U. S. Naval Forces at the Asiatic station, are expected to visit Bangkok 
next December. The Admiral will probably go there in his new flagship 
Rkkmoiid, and General Grant will go via Singapore, after visiting India 
and Ceylon. 

A correspondent from tbe foot-hills near Pekin, writes to the Shanghai 
Courier: On the way out here we passed dead bodies on the roadside, 
some being devoured by dt>gs and crows. Around us here fever exists 
just as severely as in the city; hardly a house without one or two of its 
inmates down. The jjoverty of tbe people is very great. They are eat- 
ing gi-ass, elm leaves and ground chaff. The wheat is ripening, however, 
and the later crops will be good. 

It h:i8 now been decided to open to trade the harbor of Shimonoseki, in 
Choshiu. 



Editor News Letter: I cuuoeive it will be interesting to not a tew o your 
numer<'us readers to hear s<imetliing of the previous public life-liistory of his pres- 
ent Holiness Leo the Thirteenth, in regard to literature and modem science, and the 
iufluenee that in his now exalted position he will probably exercise on their ad- 
vancement. The late Pope Pius IX., of glorious memory, was a priest pure and 
simple. Cardinal Oioachiuio Pecci is a man of letters, a philosopher, a student of 
science and a clear-sighted and strong-willed administrator. He likes to surround 
himself with scholars as well as theologians, and it is a noteworthy fact that one of 
his VameHeri pariicipanti is Monsiguor CeccoUni, formerly one of the editors of 
tbe Cassandrina, a sort of Roman Punch, and who is now at the head of the fa- 
mous literary society of Arcadia, so well described by the elder Disraeli. Another 
of the new Pope's Camerieri is Moasignor Anritti, who is also a scholar and an Ar- 
cadian, besides being one of the most popular preachers in Rome; while the Pontiffs 
private treasurer is Signer Sterbini, whose son, Giulio, is private steward to His Ho- 
liness. Both of these gentlemen are highly cultivated, and the brother of the 
former was at one time a popular poet. 

Thus if there be any truth in the old aphorism, " Nosdtur a sociie" Leo XIII. is 
likely to be a patron of science and letters. It is, however, his sympathy with the 
investigations of modem science which most encourages the hope that he will place 
himself abreast of all that is truest and best in the current of what is called " mod- 
em thought."' A little more than a year ago he issued a pa.st<jral from his Arohi- 
episcopal palace in Perugia, some portions of which might have fitly formed part of 
a lecture delivered in the Royal Institution of London. It was directed to explain 
the attitude of the Catholic Church toward modem progress and science. lu that 
pastoral letter the learned Cardinal argued that the Church has no objections what- 
ever to offer to pure science or to its legitimate conclusions, but only to such jiseudo 
scientific works as are wxitten in a materialistic and destructive spirit. He denied 
that there could be any hostility between true religi"U and genuine science. "Ex 
amine and judge for yourselves," said he. "Can there be a thinir which the Church 
can desire with greater ardor than the irlory of God and the most perfect knowledge 
of the Divine Worker which one acquires by the study of His works ? " In effect he 
could conceive no reason " why the Church should be jealous of the marvelous prog- 
ress which our aye has realized by its studies and its discoveries," and he went on to 
quote Lord Verulam's remark that "a slight and superficial knowledtre of philosophy 
may sometimes incline the mind of roan to atheism; but the progress therein brings 
the mind hack to religion." In support of this jirop^tsition, and to prove that the 
pmfoundest scientific research is compatible with the firmest belief in revealed truth, 
the Archbishop of Perugia appealed to the lives and conduct of Kepler, Qalileo Gal- 
ilei, Alessandro Volta and " the Protestant Faraday" Warming with his theme, 
tbe eloquent prelate exclaimed: " How beautiful and majesticdoes niau appear when 
he touches the thunderbolt and makes it fall impotent at his feet; when be lays hold 
upon the nimble iightnint' and sends it as the swift messenger of his thoughts across 
the abyss of the ocean, beyond the peaks of the precipitous Alps and over the far- 
stretching plains! .... Tell me, is there not in him a spark, as it were, of his 
Creator, when he calls light out of darkness and dissipates the shadows by its 
brightness?" 

But not oniy did the Cardinal Archbishop show himself to be thoroughly convers- 
ant with the scientific discoveries of the present day; bis pastoral contains a gener- 
ous tribute of admiration to the political economists uf our time. To the teachings 
of ptjlitical economy he declared the Church U> be in no wise opposed, and he dwelt 
with much emphasis upon the commercial enterprise and world-wide commerce of 
the Italian cities in the Middle Ages; upon the material and moral progress of Eu- 
rope, as exhibited more especially in the amelioration of her system of jurispru- 
dence and in the substitution of law for force, and of justice for revenge, and upon 
the important services which labor had rendered to the cause of progress and civil- 
ization — "labor," said he, " which was despised by the philosophere of antiquity, 
but elevated and ennobled by the Founder of Christianity." At the same time, be 
remarked, the Church did not and could not affirm that labor is the chief end of 
man, inasmuch as there are far nobler objects thau the accumulation of wealth; 
while he also signified bis strong disapproval of the practice of breaking in the 
young to toil at too early a period of their lives. I fear your space mil hardly ad- 
mit of more; but this installment of the published scntinicnts of Cardinal Pecci, a 
year ago Archbishop of Pemgia, now Pope Leo XIII., cannot fail to exert a 'asting 
and beneficial influence on soniething like 230,000,000 of his Catholic subjects, and 
sen-e as one more authoritative rebuke to the flippant calumniators of the Church- 
Jons J. Ble.wdalb, D. D. 



S' 



ENGLIS H BI CYCLES. 

G. L.CUWNINGHAM, 
206 Sansome street, San Francisco, 

Is now prepared to fill orders for Duplex Ex- 
celsior, Stanley, Club, Gentleman's, Challenge, 
Premier, and all other makes of English Bicycles. 
Price, from $60 to 9160, 

according to quality of material and size of 
machine. G. L. CUNNINGHAM, 

Importer of English Bicycles, 
206 Sansome St., office of Slacondray & Co., 
June 22, San Francisco, California. 



BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE. 

NEVILLE di CO., 
113 CIny and 114 Commercial Streets, 

San Frascieco. [May 24. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

old by all Statioucrs. Sole Agrent for tbe Vuited States: 

MR. HENRY HOE, Dl John street, N Y. Jan. 5. 




avory A: Moore. 143, New Bond street, call atteiition to the recognized 

remedy for 
sttima, etc. Datnra Tatala. Cigarettes and Cigars, Pastilles for 

Inhalation, in boxes, 3s. to ISs. 
atnra Tatuln for Asitania, etc. The entire plant cut and prepared 

for smoking ; Tins, 23. (id, to 18b. Economical and Efficacious. 

Savory d: 9Ioorc*s Datnra Tatala in all forms for smoking and inhala- 
tions. Medical Testimonial with each Packet. 
ntara Tfttula for ANthmn, etc. Delicate persons use the remedy as 

Cigarettes, or as Pastilles for Inhalation. 
atnra Tatnia for Asthma, etc. The words "Datura Tatula" and 
" SAVORY & MOURb; " on the labels arc the only guarantee ajjainst 
the risk of imitations. 
or Astbma, etc., Datnra Tatnia. Prepared only by SAVOKY & 
MOORE, 1-43, New Bond St., London, and of Chemists everywhere. 
[June 22.] 

4k1 O^tf^ '^^''^''y* Permanent salesmen wanted to sell 

^i,-^'"^^^ Staple Goods to dealers. No peddling. Expenses paid. Address 
Sept. I.J S. A. GRANT & CO., 2,4, ti and S Home St., Cincinnati, O. 

^O Crold Plated Watcbes. Cbenpest In tbe known world. 

viPO Sample Watc/i Free to Agents. Address A. COULTER & CO., Chicaeo. 

CL^ ^l~k/\a Tear. Agrents wanted. Bnsiness leg^ltiniate. 

<lU^^\w\J Particulars free. Address J.WORTH &CU., St. Louis, Mo. 



A 
D 



D 
D 

F 



Aug. 3, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



19 



■BIZ. 



A decided ImproTement roay he noUd in Uie i>roduee line of htiBi- 
ne»a. NVlifnt of the new tmp is now arrivini; in increasing quantities. 
t;ivinL' eniiilnynient to a liir>:« army of workew along the city front, und 
Ahippin;: intenmts Kenerallv. Our inland river steamers come in daily 
la^len with tens of thuusamfa ba«keU and nacka^'esof fruit, while the large 
Heet of mailing craft and tow boata are all actively engaged in bringing 
Wheat and Barley to tide wator. The coasting steameM to Oregon and 
Wa*hingt*>n Temtory come fully ladened with freight and passengers, 
while those of the southern coaat lines are all actively engaged in like 
pursuits. To this we add our stearaHhip lines to Central America, Pan- 
ama and the west coaat The Pacific Mail steamships to the Orient are 
fully employetl as are those of the O. and O. Company on the same route. 
During the month of July our grain fleet to the United Kingdom em- 
braced nine veMeU. carrying of Wheat 250,572 ctls., besideB 10,000 bbla. of 
Flour, to Liverpool, Last year at the same time we shipped but four ves- 
sels, with 155.329 ctls. of Wheat, valued at $351,483. In July, 187C, we 
loaded twenty-one vessels with (542,159 ctls. Wheat— $1,113,491. The 
month of August promises to be one of very considerable magnitude in 
the way of \Vneat and Flour exports. We hope to get off at least thirty 
ships— one per day— from this time on to the close of the harvest year. 

The shipping fleet in port is large, say 47 vessels on the Liverpool 
berth, to li-ad wheat, aggregating 6o,(>b0 registered tons. The disengaged 
^eet numbers 50 vessels, aggregating 60,000 registered tons, while the fleet 
"in sight," or headed this way, i^'gregates 225,000 tons register, in addi- 
tion to that here on the spot. At date there is but little new business 
offering in charters. The wheat rates to the United Kingdom are quite 
nominal. We think it probable that two or three American shins might 
now be placed to a direct port at 45s., but nothing better coula be done 
at present, as there is too large a fleet here now, under engagement to be 
loaded by the 15th inst — quite as many as we have spot wheat to fill them. 
It is possible that in September, when the Oregon crop begins to move, in 
competition with ouronn, that Charters may then be procured more 
readily than now, and should wheat decline from present rates freight 
may possibly advance to 50s. for iron ships. 

"Wheat purchcises during the last week in July, both for milling and 
export, were very considerable, the bulk of the business done at SI 60@ 
SI 65 up to SI 70(5 SI 75, the latter rate for milling purposes. At the 
close Sl 80 is said to have been paid for a round lot of very choice Extra 
Milling. For August delivery some purchases for export have been con- 
cluded at SI 70, and which at this \vTiting is the extreme of the market. 
In other grains there is nothing doing of special interest, all operations 
being entirely of a local character. 

Flour for export continues in active request. Starr Brothers, of the 
Vallejo Starr Mills, have just shipped 20,000 hf. sks., each 100 lbs, to 
Liverpool per Dallam Tower, while the O. and 0. steamship Belgic, for 
the Orient, carried the bulk of 9,000 bbls. We quote Superfine at S4 25, 
Extra Superfine S4 50, Bakers and Family Extra S5@5 50 per bbl. 

Wool, Hides and Tallowr. — A fair business is being done in all three 
articles. Good Northern Fleece Wool is in demand at 20@25c.; Southern, 
16@18c; Dry Hides, 15@16e.; Wet Salted, 7i@8^; Tallow, 7^@7^. for 
ordinary, and for refined 9@9ic. 

Butter and Cheese. — The local supply is very liberal. Choice dairy 
roll Butter 23@25c.; Cheese, 8 to 12ic, according to quality. 

Honey and Beeswax. — The former is very plentiful and cheap, at 
9@12c. for Comb, latter extra choice; Strained, 5@7c. ^ lb, according to 
quality and package. Beeswax is very scarce and in good demand at 25@ 
30c. ^ lb. 

Potatoes and Onions. —The steamsbip Belgic, for Hongkong, carried 
1,368 boxes. This was quite a relief to the market. Price, |@lc. per lb. 
Sweets have appeared in the market, and are selling at 2^. Onions are 
in fair request at 1(^1^. 

Fruits. — Our markets abound with, the very choicest fruits of the sea- 
son, the supply exceeding 10,000 packages daily of Apples, Peaches, 
Pears, Plums, Berries, etc. Prices of all kinds rule exceedingly low, 
barely covering cost and freight for marketing, say l@,2c. per pound for 
Peaches, Plums, etc. Our canners are busy putting up all sorts, and of 
the very best and choicest kinds. Other parties are turning their atten- 
tion to drying Peaches, Apples, etc. Grapes are also very plentiful and 
cheap, and this year's vinti^e will be large and good. 

Borax. — A combination has been entered into between the two leading 
producers and refiners on this coast, whereby the production of the year 
to come is to be reduced and limited by each company to 120 tons, say 
240 tons per month in the aggregate, the annual product not to exceed 
5,000,000 lbs. It is thought by this arrangement, and by withdramng 
stocks on hand from market, that paying prices will hereafter be realized. 
We now quote Concentrated 5Jc., Refined 8ti toiijc. A recent shipment, 
hence to New York, of 10 tons of Boracic Acid has attracted great atten- 
tion both at home and abroad. The New_ York tests were very satisfac- 
tory, and it seems to have been like throwing a fire-brand into the Borax 
market. We have had several personal inquiries made in reference to 
the matter by letter and otherwise. 

Quicksilver. — The O. and 0. steamship Belgic, hence for Hongkong 
on the Ist inst., carried 1,900 flasks. Our week's receipts less than 1,000 
flasks ; stock light and the market firm at 42^. ' 

Bags and Bagging. — The combination seems to have finally got con- 
trol of our ten million stock of Grain Sacks, and after selling at ll@llic. 
a milUou or two, have within a day or two advanced the price to 12^@13c. 
This action is unpopular witb the farmers, wbo buy up all the second- 
hand bags from the millers at 9c. and machine sewed at ll@.llic., and 
try every possible way to dodge the Bag ring that for the moment con- 
trols all the Calcutta and Dundee Burlaps in market. 

Duties paid at the Custom House for the month of July aggregated 
8715,000, which is the largest monthly receipt since September, 1876. 
This is a pretty good index of the improved condition of business on this 
coast, and we have every reason to believe that this is but the ^beginning 
of a more active traflS.c than for a year past. 

CoaL — The local demand consumes all the coast supplies as fast as it 
arrives, causing a slight improvement in values. There are at this writing 
seventeen cargoes of Australian now due here (60 days out), price S6, 



Lomber —There is a large stock accumulation of all sorts and kinds, 
by reason of the Hmall amount of new buildingB going up. The prices fixea 
upon by the several associations at the beginning of the year have been 
broken by the necesHities of some holders, and prices are now all afloat — 
nominal. 

Coffee, —The market is quite sluggish, by reason of heavy stocks. 
Price of best Greens, 18c.; all other kinds of Central American, 16@174c. 

Salmon.— Up to this date we have received in all this season 125,100 
cases. Price f(»r large lots for export, SI 30@1 32J. For New York ac- 
count, SI 37A has been paid for a few hundred cases of a fancy brand. 
Oregon has thus far this year sent direct to England 123,180 ca., making 
a grand total catch on the Columbia River at last mail dates, 202,518 ca. 
Fraser River (British Columbia) catch large this season. 

Sugar. — There has been no particular change in the situation for a 
week past. White Refined, ll(«:lljc.; Yellow "C," 9(a9ic. ; sales of 2,500 
kegs Hawaiian at 7h(^7'ic. to the re'finenj, and for best' grades to jobbers, 
8@8ic. The stock of Hawaiian, both here and to arrive, is now largely 
in the hands of the California Refinery. 

Tobacco.— On the 6th inst. S. L. Jones & Co. advertise a line of 2,000 

Ekgs. choice Virginia manufactured favorite brands, the importation of 
.. and E. Wertheimer, all well worthy the attention of the trade. 
Teas.— Imports during the week embrace 4,588 pkgs. per Gaelic, chiefly 
from Japan ; also, to go East by railroad, 14,307 pkgs. The market is 
quiet. 

Rice. —Imports during July, chiefly from Hongkong, were heavy, em- 
bracing cargoes per Gaelic of 34,456 mats; per ship P. J. Carleton, 32,- 
409 mats, and 48,852 mats per City of Tokio; previously the Titan 
brought 30,732 mats, and the Great Admiral 32,533 mats. The market 
at the moment is demoralized. Sales of mixed China at S5 90@6 ^ 100 
Iba.; Hawaiian, $6 50@7. 

Dry Goods. "We remark a decided rise in all kinds of common Navy 
Cotton Goods, Drills, etc., by reason of the great advance in freight rates 
by rail across the continent. 




THE COVENTET MACHINISTS' CO., 

Coventry, England. 
Manufacturers of the Celebrated Mod- 
ern Slcycles: 
" Coventry Racer," 

*'Geutleinna-s Roadster," 

and ** Clnb Bicycle,'' 
Justly Renowned for their Durability, Elegance, 
Lightness and Speed. 

A. KONEKE & CO., Agents, 
July 6. 525 Front street. 

WAKELEE'S AUREOLINE 

Produces the Beautiful Golden Hair so much A dmir ed. 

sxnpBition TO the impobteh amticzh 

— BT REASON OF 118 — 

FRESHNESS AND CAKE TTSED IN ITS PBODTJCTION. 

PBICE, lAROE BOTTI.es, $2. 

Manttfactured by B. P. WJ^KMIiEE & CO., DruggUts, comer 
Montgomerij and JStish streets, S. F. [July 20. 

1818-19. 

Personal Property Taxes, for City and County Purposes. 

Notice Is hereby ^Iveii that a certified copy of the Personal 
Property Assessment Roll of this City and County for the fiscal year 1878-79, 
has this day been placed in my hands for colleetion. Taxes thereon are now due 
and payable. Ta.\e3 remaining unpaid after MONDAY, the FIETH DAY OF 
AUGUST ensuing, wtII then be delinquent, and five per cent, will be added thereto. 
WM. MITCHELL, Tax Collector City and County of S. F. 
July 8, 1878. ; July 13. 

r. 0. Snow, SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. ¥, B. May. 

SNOW Jk MAT, 

DIPORTEKS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
Pictures, Frames, AKolillngrs, aufi Artists' Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 

NOBLE AND GALLAGHER. 

Importers and Dealers in Painters' materials, Bonse, SlKn 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 438 
Jackson street, between Montgomerj- and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomined and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May 13. 

WANTED. 

Good nve Business Hen to sell tbe Excelsior Improved liCt- 
ter Copying Book. No press, brush or water used ; copies instantly. Afjents' 
outfit, $2.50. Agents make from $10 to §15 per day. Address Excelsior Mauufac- 
turiug'Co.. 47 La Salte Street, Chicago, m. Incorporated Feb. 16th, 1877. Capital, 
3100,000. Exclusive Territory griven. July 6. 

FOR SALE, 

Completely f nrnlsbed. one of the most attractive places in 
MENLO PARK. Finely laid out, with every variety of Fruit and Ornamental 
Trees, and hut five minutes walk from the station. Fine House, Stable and Out- 
huildings. Must be seen to be appreciated. Apply to 
April 6. _^ THOMAS DAY, 122 Sutter street. 

HARTSHORN & M'PHUN, 

Mannfactnrers of all kinds of TVindow Sbades, Dealers in 
Carpets, Oil Cloths, Cornices, Window Lace, etc., 112 Fourth street, near Mis- 
sion. Factory ; Comer Bl uxome and Fifth streets. April 13. 

SANTA CRUZ. 

Apartments consisting: of two bedrooms and parlor, nieely 
furnished, with use of kitchen, in a private family. House and grounds close 
to sea-heach. Price, §40 per month. For particulars apply at this office. July 29. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Aug. 3, 1878. 



TTNDELrVERED ItETTHRS. 
Ho. 6. 

*' The Captain of the rabble issued out 
With a black, shirtless train : each was au host ; 
A million strongr of venniu, every villain 
No part of government, but lords of anarchy, 
Chaos of power, and privileged destruction ; 
Outlaws of nature f 

Drtden. 
"And the brute crowd, whose envious zeal 
Huzzas each turn of Fortune's wheel, 
And loudest shouts when lowest lie 
Exalted worth and station high." 

Scott. 
William T. Colemau. 
gja . — At this particular juncture it appears to me that I may with 
some fitness address myself to you, not in your social or business capaci- 
ties, for with them, overshadowingly prominent as they are, I have no 
present concern, but aa our foremost and best known champion in the lists 
where Order contends against Riot. It has been the evil fortune of this 
city on severable memorable occasions to be the scene of direct persoual 
conflict between oppositely constituted bodies of its inhabitants. In ear- 
lier years these conflicts presented the singular and painful spectacle of 
Kight and Justice, in the shape of the People, arrayed against Corruption 
and Oppression, in the shape of the Law, or those who should have ad- 
ministered the law. You were then foremost among those who refused to 
let the Courts of Justice be converted into sanctuaries for crime, and the 
ermine of the Judge thrown as a protecting aegis over thieves and mur- 
derers. As a member of the Vigilance Committee of '51 and President 
of the Committee of '56, you vindicated the majesty of the law by taking 
it into your own hands; it remained for you more than twenty years later, 
fl^aiu aa President of a Vigilance Committee, to vindicate the law by 
strengthening the hands of those who were righteously administering it. 
It was mainly owing to your untiring efforts and able leadership that this 
city some months ago was saved from the violence of the vilest mob that 
ever threatened its existence. The scoundrels that infested San Francisco 
in '51 and '56 were easy to deal with as compared with those of '77 and 
V8. The former were outlaws who bore the brand of actual crime upon 
their foreheads; with them you could act on the offensive, even to a war of 
extermination. But the latter, so far as their league against the peace of 
this community is concerned, are criminals in word and intent only; 
against them we have constantly to be prepared, but so long as our imbe- 
cile law takes no cognizance of incendiary and riotous speeches, we must 
content ourselves with remaining passively on the defensive. The conse- 
quence is, that the orderly portion of this community, and those who 
have some interests at stake in it, must sit quietly by while their business 
is injured and their property decreases in value. For what merchant or 
man of capital is there among us who has not bitterly felt the effects of 
the recent disturbances? There is no business confidence in the place; 
every species of property is depreciating in value, and at a period when 
we should be experiencing the highest degree of prosperity we find a pall 
of depression drawn over all our hopes and imdertakings. It is useless to 
attempt to account for this deploratile state of things by a drouth of two 
seasons ago. One such misfortune cannot for any length of time paralyze 
the energies of a great country like this; we have, besides, had a magnifi- 
cent harvest since then. _ No, sir; it is not any lack of resources within 
oxu"selvea that has occasioned the present stagnation. It is the distrust 
which we have of each other, and which others have of us, and this dis- 
trust has been engendered by the threats hurled against life and property 
by the Commxmists who call themselves Workingmen. 

As I have already said, when these villains actually attempted for a 
moment to put their measures into execution, you and those led by you 
at once took such vigorous action that mob violence was instantly sup- 
pressed. But, sir, my reason for addressing you is to point out that your 
task is by no means ended yet. The power of the Communists to injure 
this city and State does not lie in open violence alone. So long as they 
are permitted to talk tire and blood with impunity, so long will a feeling 
of insecurity exist, which must be fatal to the prosperity of the country. 
What are we going to do about it ? This is the question which will 
probably present itself to your mind. Well, I do not ask you to sum- 
mon your hickory-club cohorts — yet. They are ready when you want 
them, and are content to wait until you sound the tocsin. But if we 
glance for a moment at the causes and sustaining power of the Commun- 
istic element, we ahall be able to gather a hint or two as to what may be 
done in the mean time. _ The plain truth is this : if it were not for the 
daily Press of San Francisco, the Communists would have died out aa 
they came. Like so many mushrooms, they sprang in a night from the 
dunghill of their own envy and avarice, and like so many mushrooms 
they would have rotted in a few hours, but for the forcing process and 
careful nurture which the daily papers bestowed upon them. A few ig- 
norant, uneducated boors, actuated only by a stupid lust for what be- 
longed to others, could never have stood against the pressure of right- 
minded public opinion, without exterior encouragement. The papers 
knew the danger of the movement ; they were not fools enough to believe 
that San Francisco would submit to be physically bullied, but they knew 
that the moral effect coiild not fail to lje disastrous to a community which 
claimed respectability. Unfortunately, they saw, or thought they 
saw, a few stray dimes in the way of subscriptions and party 
advertisements in backing up the oppressed classes. Forthwith 
they rivaled each other in giving prominence to the incendiary rantings of 
the so-called " Workingmen." Every effort of the authorities to put the 
screw of the law upon the evil, they defeated with doses of balderdash 
about "free speech." As if free speech included the right to threaten fire 
and pillage! So they fought and wrangled and vied with each other for 
the favor of the mob — reporting every murderous sentiment that the sand- 
lot audiences applauded — until at length a local pimple was magnified 
into a State ulcer, and people abroad came to look askance at California, 
and to regard her as an uncivilized region, where a man's dollar was likely 
to be divided among the multitude at any moment. By dint of superior 
cunning, however, and an inborn aptitude for pandering to the lower or- 
ders, one paper succeeded in crowding out the rest, and achieved the proud 
distinction of being appointed the authorized organ of Communism. Its 
columns are daily crowded with false and exaggerated reports of an Irish 
lunatic's doings in the East, whereby the mobs here become inflated with 
a sense of their own importance, and are urged on to the commission of 
crimes against law and society which would not otherwise have pene- 



trated theirtpates. It is for order-loving people to consider whether they 
will encourage this inflammatory journalism by purchasing and reading 
it, while they condemn the incendiarism which it promulgates and excites. 
And it is to you, sir, as the acknowledged type of a popular, vigorous and 
essentially Califomian feeling in such matters, that this protest against 
ruinous journalistic claptrap is made by 

Your obed't servant, 

POOR ENGIiAXn> ! 

The TTTiseacres and croakers of the cis- Atlantic press are just now 
beginning to lecture England on the folly and infamy of her diplomatic 
course, and to instruct in what she shall do to save herself from present 
execration and ultimate disaster. Not content with aflBrming that the 
British Premier has swindled Europe and betrayed the Turk, they also 
declare that he has treated his own country in the same way. He has 
acted upon h^ own responsibility, without consulting the wishes of the 
people; he has juggled with the great name of England, and has com- 
mitted the country to a policy which will end in ruin. Of course all this 
twaddle does not originate in the hypothetical brains of our wonderful 
scribes, but is an echo of the utterances of the Harwarden woodchopper 
and the savage rag-tag-and-bobtail that dogs his disconsolate heels. 
Though to all except those who wont see, the enthusiastic approval of the 
English people is manifest, yet we are persistently informed that "in 
the most thoughtful circles" the Anglo-Turkish Treaty is deprecated 
and deplored, while Lord Beaconsfield's mode of bringing it about is 
unhesitatingly condemned. But the eublimest bight of penny-a-line 
impudence is attained when it is suggested that by ordering the evac- 
uation of Cyprus and refusing to assume the protectorate over Asiatic 
Turkey, Parliament may even yet, to some extent, redeem England's po- 
sition. That is to say, if Great Britain will meekly surrender all the ad- 
vantages she has gained, and degrade and dishonor the man who secured 
them for her, she may yet find favor in the eyes of Gladstonites and An- 
erlophobes. Perhaps an apology to Kussia for having dared to thwart her 
schemes will be next in order, or perchance a present of India, if promptly 
and submissively made, might induce the Czar to refrain from thrashing 
England at his earliest convenience. 

Really there is something startUngly novel in the idea that John Bull 
is a blind victim, led to the altar of annihilation by a scheming political 
trickster. We -always gave the old gentleman credit for being pretty 
wide-awake, and quite able to take care of his own interests, present and 
prospective. Poor fellow ! It is sad to see him so exultant over this hor- 
rible Asiatic pit fall, and to know that some day the Russian Bear will 
come along and gobble him up body and bones. It is pitiful to contem- 

glate him as he chuckles over hia fancied spoils, all unaware that it has 
een settled in America that he is worse off than ever. It is a miserable 
thing to hear him talk of his free government, when our own Jones, of 
the Dailp Fungus, has decided that his very Premier is an autocrat. In 
short, as we observe this poor deluded John Bull, we can only raise 
our eyes to heaven in thankfulness that we dwell in a "tree and en- 
lightened republic," where honesty is the one God, and the Joneses of 
Daily Fungi are his prophets. 

" Perhaps this flight of Eeaconsfield may lead to important modifica- 
tions more in accordance with popular institutions as they exist to-day." 
Such is the utterance of one of cur local Joneses, and what a very fine 
utterance it is ! Here was a vastly important international treaty, 
formed and signed by the authorized representatives of England and Tiir- 
key. Both these countries are well satisfied with it, and yet, forsooth, it 
is a " flight," not " in accordance -with popular institutions as they exist 
to-day." Exist where? The Anglo-Turkish treaty seems to be a pretty 
*' popular institution" with those whom it most concerns. Or are we to 
suppose that the word " popular" ia only to be applied to the institutions 
of this country, where '* there is not the wide gulf of social distinction 
that there is in England between the two Houses ?" " Social distinction" 
is good, dear scribe, but, could the members of those Houses hear you say 
so, they would open their eyes at the profundity of your knowledge about 
the English social scale. You were nearer the mark when you pointed out 
sometimeago bow deliberate andfar-sighted the Beaconsfield administration 
has been in its attention to foreign affairs, showing that the first, mani- 
festation of the policy which culminated in the Turkish Convention was 
the annexation of the Fiji Islands. Then came the extension of Eng- 
land's territory on the eastern coast of Africa. This was followed by the 
proclamation under which Queen Victoria assumed the title of Empress 
of India. Subsequently the Transvaal Republic in South Africa was an- 
nexed by force of arms to the British Crown. And then came the trans- 
ter of Cyprus from Turkey, and the establishment of a protectorate over 
Asia Mm or. 

■WILL HE REFUSE A CROWN? 
Is there anything in Grant's visit to England and the Con- 
tinent beyond mere recreation? Those of his prominent po- 
litical friends who are acknowledged to be ' the wire-pullers 
of the Republican party, speak of him aa their candidate 
for the next Presidential terra, and hold him up as the most availa- 
ble man. That he would accept the position there is not a shadow of 
doubt, for when was he ever known to refuse anything that possessed 
value ? In view of the possibility and probability that he will be the man, 
the old New York Herald theory of Cfesarism comes to the surface once 
more, and the figure of Ulysses I., Emperor, etc., appears in the distance. 
Can it be that, believing himself destined to be agam the ruler of the Re- 
public, he is fitting himself for any change that may occur in our style of 
Government during his third term? Or, in plainer language, is he taking 
lessons in how to be a King? He certainly has had excellent opportuni- 
ties, for since he was first entertained at Windsor Palace, and wondered, 
when he observed Honl soit quimal c jiense carved on the mantel, if it 
meant no smoking allowed in bed, up to the present moment, he has been 
the constant recipient of honors at the hands of royalty. He certainly 
should know how it is done by this time, and when he is called upon to 
organize his household after the manner of Kings and Emperors, he 
should be able to make his appointments after the most approved Euro- 
pean style. His chamberlains, lords in waiting, grooms, etc., will doubt- 
less be selected from the gems of his Republican friends, so that at all 
Court receptions, balls and other royal festivities, his dignity will be well 
sustained. The experience Grant has had should give him all the knowl- 
edge required, and we look forward to the time when he assumes the 
sceptre with feelings of satisfaction, knowing that his European tour has 
not been without good results. 



Priea yr Copy. lO Cfii«i.l 



ESTABUSHED JULT, 80. 1856. 



lAnniul Snbuorlptloni t6. 



9AN ^^<BB9eo 




DEVOTES TO THE LEASINO INTEKESTS OF CAHTOBNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 29. 



SAN FBAKOISOO. SATUEDAY, AUG. 10, 1878. 



No. 4. 



oaic« of Ibe San Francisco Newa Letter, 9Iercbant Street, 

Nos. 607 to 61S, San Francisco. 

GOLD BARS— 890@915— Silver Bars— G@16 f cent. disc. Treasury 
Notes aresellintr at par. Bujnng, 99|. Mexican Dollars, 7@7i per 
per cent, nominal. Trade Dollara, 2i@3 per cent, discount 



■ Exchange on New York, ■■ 
London, Bankers, 49^ ( 
sight, 5 francs per dollar. 



per cent, for Grold ; Currency, 100. On 
5 49^ ; Commercial. 49id. @ 49gd. Paris, 
Telegrams, 55-100@g per cent. 



aS" Latest price of Gold at New York, Aug. 9tb, at 3 P.M., 1004. Latest 
price of Sterling, 483i@487i. 

PBIGE3 OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOV£BNM£NT BONDS. 

Sas Francisco Aug. 9, 1878. 



Slocks and Bonds. 


Bid. 


Aslxd 


V. S. Bonds. 5-203 1S67-63.. 


106 


lOO) 


Lccal Tender Notes 

S. F. City « Co. B'ds, (is, 'SS 


m 


m 


104 


— 


S. F. Cilv Bonds. 73 


107 


— 


Sacramento City Bonds — 


28 


30 


Yuba County Bonds, 83 


100 





San Mateo Co. Bonds, "3... 


102 


104 






94i 
80 


National G. B'k & Trust Co. 


75 


Spring Valley Water Co — 


94 


94( 


I 


JRECKI 


'RIDQE 



i; Stocks and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co 

, N. B. and Mission R. R. Co. 
I; Front St. , M. & O. R. R. Co, 
! Fireman's Fund Ins. Co.... 

i Union Insurance Co 

: Pacific Bank 

1 1 The Bank of California. . . . . 
|! Central Pacific Railroad 



Bid. 

20 



110 
115 



& Yost. Brokers^ 304 Montgomery street. 



THE STOCK MARKET. 

The excitement in mining shares continues unabated, and business at 
the Boards is increasing daily. The large and rapid advance in some 
stocks has found a culminating point for the time, while other stocks 
have come to the front as the favorite gambles. Sierra Nevada is the cen- 
tral point of interest, and news from the mine is eagerly sought after. 
While reliable information from this quarter is exceedingly meager, we 
must caution the public not to get unnecessarily enthused over what is at 
best a simple prospect. The stock, however, appears to be well concen- 
trated, and recent heavy purchases have been made for account of insid- 
ers, while the outside public have realized to a great extent. Under the 
influence of large orders from the bonanza firm, a rapid advance was 
made in Union, untJl now both of these prime favorites are ruling at 
about even quotations. Mexican participates with the two above-men- 
tioned stocks, while Ophir, the hitherto fancy of the street, is heavy and 
inactive. The knowing ones, however, are predicting a sudden advance 
for the old favorite, and the extreme scarcity of the stock indicates that 
the shares are well in hand. During the past week nearly all the leading 
stocks have been taken up in turn, and had more or less of a deal, while 
many of the lesser descriptions have also been cared for. At the close 
the market showed a slight falling-off, which would seem only natural 
after such a magnificent advance. The market generally has a strong un- 
dertow, which betokens a speedy reaction. 'Outside stocks are without 
particular change, though lightly dealt in. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange.— New York, Aug. 9th, 
1878.— Gold opened at 1004; 11 a.m., at 100.^; 3 p.m, at 100^. United 
States Bonds— Five-twenties of 1867, 105; 1881, 106^. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 834@4 87A. short. Pacific Mail, 16. Wheat, SI 15@S1 28, strong. 
Western Union, 90'1- Hides, steady, fair demand, 19@19^. Oil— Sperm, 
86@88. Winter Bleached, 97 @ 1 04i. Whale Oil, 40 @ 45 ; Winter 
Bleached, 51@58. Wool— Spring, fine, 18@26 ; Burry. 10@14 ; Pulled, 
28@38 ; Fall Clips, 14fS)i8 ; Burry, 14@18. London, Aug. 9th.— Liver- 
pool Wheat Market, lOs. 2d.@103. 5d. 0\nh, 10s. 3d. @, 10a. 8d. United 
States Bonds, 108i@106| ; 4 P.M., 10S@108J. Consols, 94 15-16® 95 316, 
94 13-16@94 15-16. 

BEIili TELEPHONE COMPAlTr. 
Additional Names up to Aug:. 10, 1878. -S.F. Female Hospital -OfficeC. 
B. Hutchins, M. U. Southern Pacific H. R. Co.— Office A. 0. Bassett. Dr. James Mur- 
phy— Residence. Captain J. G. Foster, ClifE House— Merchants' Exchange. J. W. 
H Campbell— Bray Bros. J. W. H. Campbell— Produce Exchange, Dickson De- 
Wolf & Co.— Office J. W. H. Campbell. Golden Age Flour Mills— Office J. W. H. 
Campbell. Captain Henry Brigham's Office -Residence. S, F.GasIij^ht Co — Po- 
trero Works and King street Mechanics' Institute— Pavilion California Transfer 
Co., Montgomery street— Hayes & Co., Davis street. Northern Pacific R. R. Co — 
P. Donahue, residence. P. Donahue, Esq.— S. F Gas Co. Toohey & Co., Mission 
street— Bush street. Oregon S. N. Co.— Folsom-street wharf. 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEDVS OF FACT AND THOUGHT. 



Califomians Registered at the Office of Charles Le Oay, Ameri- 
can Commission Merchant, 1 Rue Scribe, Paris, July 23, 1878 : 
Capt, W. C. Talbott, Miss E. F. Talbot, Miss Florence T. Pope, F, C. 
Talbot, Arthur M. Hickox and wife, Almarin B. Paul, Jr., Mrs. H. 
Marshall and son, S. G. Skidmore, A. A. Cohen and family, John W. 
Shaw and wife, Jos. G. Boyne and wife, C. A. Wetmore, Louis Geneve, 
P. Kerby and wife. Miss M. Kirby, Miss Lizzie Kirby, Wm. Shields, 
R. B. Gray and wife, Mrs. S. L. Bee, John Benson, Mrs. Dyer, Misses 
Dyer, John K. Hackett, Mrs. Wm. Haydon, Miss Cora Taylor, Miss 
Lilian Taylor, Miss Brightie Bush, Miss Alice Bush, Miss Emma White, 
Miss Ella Cutler, Charles De Young, Mrs. L. E. Bailey, Capt. I. W. 
Lees. Miss Ella Lees. Mrs. M. A. Bartlett, Miss Webster, J. B. E. Ca- 
vaillier, C. G. Hooker and wife, Mrs. George Hyde, Miss Hyde, John 
Alexander and familv, E. Wood Perry, Jr., Washington Bartlett, C. 
Bertheau, Jr., Mrs. Wm. Corbitt, Misses Corbitt, .lohn Nightingale, J. 
Foley, Jno. Y. Hallock, Mrs. E. P. Bradley. Joshua Tevls and wife, 
Samuel Tevis, Harry Tevis, Col. A. R. Eddy ana wife, Miss Eddy, Drury 
Melone and wife, C. F. Fargo, George F. Baker, Mrs. Thos. H. Selby and 
family, Mrs. P. Caduc and family, Leopold Cahn and wife, Eugene Cahn, 
Edmund Godchaux, Rafael Weill, Albert Sutro, J. M. Goewey and wife, 
Henry Schmieden and family, John Spruance and family, Sigd. Stein- 
hart, Jos. A. Donahoe and family. Dr. G. W. Wood, E. C. Doran and 
family, Jno. F. Swift and wife, Mrs. W. J. Younger, Misses McAllister, 
Miss Hatch, Miss May Burton, Benoni Irwin and family, Dr. S. M. 
Martin. 

Beerbohm's Telegram. — London and Liveepool, Aug. 2d, 1878. — 
Floating Cai^oes, unaltered ; Cargoes on Passage, unaltered ; Mark 
Lane Wheat, Slow ; No. 2 Spring Off Coast, 40s. 6d.; Red Winter Off 
Coast, 47s. 3d.; California Off Coast, 53s.; California Nearly Due, 49s.; 
California Just shipped, 46s. 6d.; No. 2 Spring for Shipment, 393. 6d. @ 
403.; English Country Markets, Steady; French Country Markets, Turn 
Dearer. Weather in England — Harvest operations proceeding favorably. 
Liveroool Spot Wheat, unaltered; California Club, 10s. 5a.@10s. 9d.; 
California Average, 10s. ld.@103. 5d.; Red Western Spring, Ss. lld.@93, 
6d.— New York, August 9th.— Gold i; Sterling E.xchauge, 83i@87i; 
Consols, 94 15-16 ; Money, 95 3-16. 

The Presbyterian Church in America.--The three American As- 
semblies have just closed their dehbarations. The Northern Assembly, 
which met at Pittsburg, is represented by 4,800 ministers, 5,150 churches 
and 557,670 communicants; 1,000 persons are supported in the foreign 
work, and it has 13 theological seminaries, with 56 professors and 600 stu- 
dents. The Southern Assembly has about 1,800 ministers and 120,000 
members, 2 seminaries, 100 students, and sustains 16 foreign missionaries. 
The Cumberland Presbyterian Assembly has been in session at Lebanon. 
It is represented by 1,275 ministers, 2,000 congregations, with 100,000 
members. The aggregate strength of Presbyterianism in the United 
States is, therefore, 10,000 ministers, 12,000 congregations and more than 
1,000,000 members. 

The Paris " Figaro," the liveliest and least conscientious daily paper 
in France, has announced another twenty per cent, dividend. Ihe day 
of heavy, somniferous journalism is past. In this afternoon of the nine- 
teenth century the demand seems to be for entertainment, not instruction, 
and the spicier and wickeder the entertainment the better. — Saturday 
Evening Call, Peoria, lil. 

Lieutenant George F. Harrison, of the United States Army, who is 
the first native Califoruian graduated at West Point, is now in the city, on 
a visit to his relatives. He occupies the distinguished position of one of 
the instructors at West Point, which circumstance redounds greatly to the 
ability and credit of so young a gentleman. He returns East next week. 

The Bell Telephone was exhibited on H. B. M. ship Skah yesterday, 
to the great satisfantion of the officers and attending guests. Communi- 
cations were passed freely from topgallant forecastle to the brid.ge, quarter 
deck and Admiral's cabin, the circuit being made through the waters 
alongside in place of the several ground wires. 

In the town of Vissilia, on the night of the 3d inst., the "Graham 
Block" was totally destroyed by fire; loss, S7,000. What description of 
block must it have been to have caused a loss of only §7,000 ? We pre- 
sume it was composed of Mussel Slough shanties. 

. London, Aug. 9. 1878.-Late3t Price of ConsoU, 94 16-16<ai6-16. 



Printed and Pablished by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 616 Merchant Street, San Francisco, Oalifomia. 



=1 



2 



SAN FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



THE NUDE AT SANTA CRUZ. 

Some thousands of our fellow citizens have sought refuge from the 
dust and heat of the city on the eea-side at Santa Cruz, or in the more 
sombre, though not less pleasant, groves below Monterey. _ Among the 
rest, we were sufficiently venturesome to take an excursion ticket for the 
round trip, and, to our inexpressible relief, found ourselves on a dark' 
foggy night landed right side uppermost on the wharf at Santa Cruz, hav- 
ing by a miracle survived the horrors of sea-sickness, the infernal noise of 
the fog-whistle, and the everlasting tin-pot music from the band on board. 
We found our way to the principal hotel in the city, where we flattered 
ourselves, with fat Jack Falstaff, that we would take our ease in our own 
inn. But we had come to see the charms of Santa Cruz— the si- 
rens who disport their lovely proportions in the briny, regardless 
of the vulgar herd who collect on the beach to take stock of 
the ladies. Soon were our eyes regaled by bevies of damsels in 
all the coquettish undress termed bathing-suits, wending their way 
by twos and threes to the water's edge. Young and old, fat and slim, fair 
and tanned, all sorts and all degrees passed muster under fire from a hun- 
dred critical eyes. While we feasted our optics on the cheering sight of 
80 much unadorned loveliness, we were not oblivious to the passing re- 
marks of the surrounding spectators. One vulgarian would insist on com- 
menting aloud, as the ladies passed from the bath-house, with such re- 
marks as the foUowiog : "beef to the heels," "spindle shanks," "flat- 
foot," etc., showing an obvious want of appreciation on his part. The re- 
marks of a few old ladies near us were not much more complimentary to 
the bathers. We wondered how We/; would have looked in similar, cos- 
tumes. We must admit, however, that we were somewhat shocked when 
we saw a number of more than half naked men lying on the sand, con- 
versing with the ladies sitting there, though the latter seemed not to be 
shocked at all. It is all very well for married ladies, with the consent of 
their husbands, to witness and to talk to big hulking members of the male 
sex who are all but in puris natumUfjus. To othei-s, who have some sense 
of decency, such an exposfe is offensive, and more so when young girls are 
present. We saw a fellow, who evidently imagined himself an Adonis, 
standing right in the midst of women and children, with no other object 
save to exhibit his fine proportions, which were liberally exposed, and we 
longed to make our bootmaker acquainted with his tailor — although his 
tailor in this case was wanting. We understand that such outrages on 
decency have driven several families of respectability away. It is not 
pleasant for a husband or a brother to come down to the beach and find 
his wife or sisters in the midst of a party consisting of well-dressed women 
and semi-uude men. The sooner some restrictions are made in this re- 
spect the better. Whatever may be said about the costumes of the ladies, 
thet/ have at le;ist the recommendation of being decent, and by the rules 
which regulate good society, the dress of the men should be equally so 
when they ventui-e to mix, \vith the non-bathers on the sea-beach. 

THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL REESE 
It ia understood that the will of the late Michael Reese will not be 
filed until after Mr. Jacob Rosenberg, one of the executors from Chicago, 
reaches this city, and he will probably not arrive before the end of this 
month. In respect to the value of the estate, between seven and eight 
millions is the estimate formed by those most competent of judging. The 
investments in real .property in this city and throughout California, and 
in other States, is enormous, to say nothing of bonds, stocks and other 
securities, which are in like proportion. Enough of the will has been 
made public to know that the bulk of his property is to be divided among 
five surviving sisters residing in Chicago, and the children of a deceased 
sister, share and share alike. The schedule which includes all the be- 
quests to public institutions is as follows: Pacific Hebrew Orphan Asj'lum 
and Home Society, 820,000; St. Luke's Hospital, of this city, -?10,000; 
Mount Sinai Hospital, of New York city, 535,000; Hebrew Orphan Asy- 
lum, of New York city, 825,000; Regents of the University of Califor- 
nia, $50,000, to be by them invested in the founding and maintaining a 
library, to be known and called the Reese Library of the University of 
California; to Jacob Rosenberg and Henrietta Rosenberg, of Chicago, 
.S200,000, in trust, to be distributed by them in such charities as they may 
think fit; Mrs. R. C. Johnson, in trust, for a borne or asylum for aged 
people, regardless of creed; and the San Francisco Foundling and Lying- 
in Hospital, S30,000. It is understood that Mrs. J()hn3on has declined 
tho trust. Eureka Benevolent Society, of San Francisco, 320,000; the 
German Hospital of San Francisco, §10,000; to his nephews, H. L. Frank 
and Joseph Frank, in trust for the Orphan Asylums in Cleveland, Ohio, 
and other charities in Chicago, $50,000; Doctor Eckel, in trust for hisson 
Charles, S5,000; Leinhart Weglehner, a clerk in the office of the 
deceased, S2,.n00; Mrs. Regina Gutman, of New York, 810,000, and Mrs. 
Leopold Greenberg, of San Francisco, $2,500. Before leaving for 
Europe, Mr. Reese presented his nephew, Joseph Rosenberg, to whom 
he trusted his power of atturney, with all of his stock in the North Beach 
and Mission. Central and Omnibus Railroad lines, estimated at about 
§100,000 in value. Mr. Reese maintained bis residence in San Mateo 
county with the family of Charles Lux, in order to evade taxation on per- 
sonal property in this city. Mr. Joseph Rosenberg has been appointed 
by Judge Bickwell, of San Mateo county, special administrator of the es- 
tate. He has filed a bond for S20,p00, with Joseph Rosenbei-g, Charles 
Lux of San Mateo, and James T. Boyd of San Francisco, as bondsmen. 

THE INDIAN PROBLEM. 
NOTP" that the Indian ^^ar is about over, it remains to be seen 
whether the Government will take any steps in the right direction to pre- 
vent another. It is not at all necessary to adopt any particularly strin- 
gent measures against the Indians, though this is what will probably be 
done. The redskins are not to blame for the trouble, and, had they been 
fairly treated, they would not have taken up arms. The boot of blame is 
quite on the other leg; what we have to look to is the weeding out and 
punishment of the rascally agents who by their systematic thievery have 
exasperated the Indians to the pitch of hostility. When the people come 
to pay the bills of the recent war, they will perhaps see tliia matter in its 
true light, and will begin to learn that it is not by cramping the Indians 
on narrow reservations, and treating them like so many troublesome 
children, that the interests of the country are best served. It is useless 
to ai^ue about the rights of the aboriginal owners of the country we live 
in, but it is plain to all right-minded men that we owe them a great deal; 
and though we never mean to pay the debt, yet if we can protect our na- 
tive creditors from further wrong and spolifttion, we are cowardly scotm- 
didls not to do 80. 



THE CAUFORNIA SAVINGS BANKS. 

The seim-annual reports of the Savings Banks of the State have 
now all been published, in accordance with the requirements of the law. 
Their condition is very favorable, when all the circumstances are con- 
sidered. The year through which we have passed has been a trying one, 
and the ordeal one which they (our banks) will seldom be called upon to 
encounter. 

The twelve Savings Banks of this city report their deposits on June 
30th, 1878, as follows: 



Name of 
Savings Bank Incorporations. 



Savings and Loan Society 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

French Savings and Loan Society 

San Francisco Savings Union 

Odd Fellows' Savings Bank 

Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank of Savings.. 

German Savings and Loan Society 

Masonic Savings and Loan Bank 

Humboldt Savings and Loan Society. . . . . . 

Security Savings Bank 

California Savings and Loan Society 

Franco -American Savings Bank 



Totals, 
Totals, 
Totals, 
Totals, 
Totals, 
Totals, 
Totals, 



,July 30, 1878. 
January. 1S78. 

July, 1877 

January, 1877. 
January, 1876. 
January, 1875, 
January, 1873. 



Number Amount 

Depositors, of Deposits. 



8,865 

18,864 

6,500 

8,548 

4,721 

695 

8,057 

5,568 

2,697 

1,150 

680 

142 



66,487 
70,713 
78,779 
75,496 
68,972 
60.660 
46,060 



89,179,500 

15,283,100 

5,810,000 

9,251,800 

3,191,900 

495.000 

9.530,400 

1,161.100 

1,123,500 

2,294,800 

323.500 

90,000 



$57,734,600 
60,631,371 
62,230,929 
59,603,6.51 
56,260,964 
55.021,177 
42,474,935 



From this it will be seen that during the past six months the deposits 
have decreased nearly 83,000,000, and the aggregate savings are now 
just about what they were two years ago. The reduction during the 
past six months may be attributed to the withdrawal of deposits after the 
run on the Clay street and Odd Fellows' Banks. Most of these deposits 
have probably gone into the U. S. Treasury for subscriptions to the four 
per cent. loan. In the pressure of the hard times there has also been 
more or less expenditure of savings among the laboring classes, the num- 
ber of depositors having decreased 12,260 during the year, and 4,194 in 
six months. 

The seventeen Savings Banks in the interior report favorably, their de- 
posits having decreased only 8535,200 since January. The aggregates 
are as follows: Deposits, 813,488,600; capital stock, 83,048,.500; reserve, 
8707,800; total liabilities, 817,733,000; resources, 817,733,200, including 
loans on real estate, 812,438,800; bonds, stocks, etc., 8419,300; cash on 
hand, 81,325,200. The total deposits of all the Savings Banks in the 
State amount to 871,223,200, against 574,655,100 January 1st, 1878— a de- 
crease of 83,431,000. 



SIGNAL SERVICE METEOROLOGHCAL REPORT. WEEK 

ENDING AUG.. 8. 1878. SAN PRANCISCO, CAL. 

JSighest and T,owest JSaromefer, 



Frl. 2. 



30.00 
20.92 

63.5 
&3 

79 

SW. 

255 

Fair. 



29.97 
29.91 



Sun. 4 



Mon5. 



29.99 
29.29 



Tue. 6 


Wed? 


29.9i 
29.90 


29.94 
29.90 



Jttaximtim and, Hfinhnum Thertnometer. 



51 

S1.7 
SW. 
273 
Fair. 



I 



I 63 I 66 I 65 I 6i 
I 54 I 54 I 53 I 53 

Mean Daily Xfumiditt/, 
I 77 I 81.3 I 71.3 I 74.7 

Frevailing Wind. 
I SW. I W. I SW. I SW. 

Wi7id — MUes Traveled, 
I 3S9 I 402 I 236 | 307 

State of Weatlter. 
I Clear 1 Clear. | Clear [ Fair. 
Rainfall in Twenty-four Sours. 
I I I I 



71 
54 

70 

SW. 

236 

Clear. 



I 



Total Rain Hiirlng Season, beginning tTulj/ 1, 387ft. ■■ -01 inches. 



SANITAHY NOTES. 
Eighty-six deatlis occurred this week as compared with 72 last, and 
97 for the corresponding week last year. Fifty-four males and 32 females; 
18 under one year, 12 under two years. Seven were Chinese. There was 
one accidental, 2 homicides and 1 suicide. There were no deaths in the 
Third and Fifth \\'"ard8, but the highest mortalities were in the Tenth 
and Eleventh Wards. Seventeen persons died in public Institutions. Of 
the zymotics there was 1 typhoid, 4 diphtheria, 3 cholera infantum, and 5 
whooping cough. There were 3 deaths from bronchetis, 2 from pneu- 
monia, 17 consumption. Inflammation of the stomach was the cause of 5 
deaths, and heart disease of 4. Cancer is charged with 3 deaths, but the 
mortality from this disease runs to such unusual figures that we cannot 
help suspecting that it is often used as a convenient term for obscure or 
incurable complaints. Throughout the mortality returns a little more 
exact patheology is highly desirable. Whooping cough is still prevalent. 
Tho mortality is probably increased by the foolish practice of exposing 
the young sufferers to cold winds, the effluvia of gas works, etc. , during the 
inflammatory stage of the complaint. For two or three weeks all children 
with whooping cough should keep in doors and in a warm atmostphere. 
After this the effects of change of air often seem miraculous. 

"We have received the August number of the Cottst Seview, a journal 
devoted to fire, marine and life insurance, and finance. It contains much 
valuable information on all matters relating to insurance in all branches, 
and w-i recommend its perusal by all those who may be interested in the 
subject. 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



CALIFOIINIA AnvTrj?TT«5vi> 



A SPECIMEN OF MR. SWTNBX7RNEB HAPPIEST 
LTRICAL MANNER. 

I A R A L L -V U U F 1) It K A M L A N 1».J 

I Itiil my boart Jii » ne«t of rtues, 

Out of tlu» mm a way, liiiMen aitart ; 

In ti Htiftcr lied tLan the coft wliito suow'd is, 

I'^mler tUe nwes I hi*i my lu-art, 

Why won Ul itMleopn<»t? why shonhl it Btjwt, 

Whi'ii nevor h leaf of the nwe-treo stirred? 

Wliiit made sleep flutter his wiiijpj and part? — 

Ouly the Aoug of a secret birtl. 

Lie still, I «;iid, for tlie wind's win^ closes, 

And mild leaves miitlU' the keen sun's dart; 

Lie still, for the wind on the warm sea dozes. 

And the wind is un<iuieter than thou art. 

I>t)e8 a thou.L,'ht in thee still as a thorn's wound smart? 

I*oe8 the imncr still fret thee of hope deferred ? 

What bids the lids of thy sleep depart ? — 



W bat bills the hus oi thy sleep t 

Only the souir of a secret bird. 

The green land's name that a charm incloses, 

It never was writ in the traveler's chart, 

And sweet on its trees as the fruit that grows is, 

It never was soltl in the merchant's mart. 

The swallowa of dreams through its dim Gelds dart, 

And sleep's are the tunes in the trce-ttJiis heard ; 

No hound's note wakens the wiUlwood hart — 

Only the song of a secret bird. 

Envoi. 
In the world of dreams I have chosen my part. 
To sleep for a season and hear no word 
Of true love's truth or of lii,'lit love art — 
Only the song of a secret bird. 

ART JOTTINGS, 

The Art Department at the Fair has always been one of the princi- 
pal attractions, and this year efforts are being made to make it more in- 
teresting than usual. One of the early announcements of the present 
management wa'i to the effect that the contract system to cover the walls 
with paintings of Eastern manufacture would be abandoned, and the 
whole gallery given in charge of the Art Association, much depend- 
ence was placed in the good will of our local artists to second the efforts 
of the Fair Management in their behalf by contributing some of their best 
works. So far there is but little to indicate that there will be anything 
like a respectable exhibit made by them, and if the Art Gallery of the 
coming exhibition proves attractive, it will be owing to the works loaned 
from private collections, and not to any new pictures sent in by our local 
artists. 

Several of the leading painters have left town on sketching tours, and 
made no provision for representation at the coming Fair. Seeing that 
such loud complaint was made about the action of the Institute last year, 
it looks a little like a dog-in-the-manger policy on the part of our artists. 
If they did not intend to exhibit at the Mechanics' Fair they should have 
given timely notice to that effect, and the managers could have made 
other arrangements for pictures, whereas now they must take the few 
fresh works offered by the artists, and fill up with pictures which have 
been, for the most part, exhibited before. 

Two v-'eeks ago we received a note from a lady residing at the Palace 
Hotel, calling attention to a large painting on exhibition at Currier's, on 
Kearny street, and stating that the painter, Mr. Albert Jenks, had exe- 
cuted three others of similar importance and equal merit, to the order of 
two residents of the Palace. 

The one on view to the public is painted from the well-known engrav- 
ing of "Adrien Morea-u's " " Rest at a Farm House." It is quite evident 
the painter has never seen a work by this talented young artist, or he 
would not so outrage the author by the ridiculous coloring introduced. 
The quality of the picture, or rather the lack of it, gives evidence that it 
ia the work of a manufacturer of pictures, to which guild Mr. Jenks be- 
longs, having graduated from the portrait -making firm of Jenks, Pebbles 
& Baldwin. Portraits done in this style are bad enough, but when such 
artists' works as Moreau, Baugniet, Detaille, and Benesur are outraged 
in this manner, it is contemptible. 

The Detaille picture sought to be counterfeited is the celebrated pic- 
ture exhibited by him at the Salon of 1875, representing the charge of 
the Ninth Regiment of Cuirassiers, in the village of Morsbronn, on the 
6th of August, 1870. It is said to be the finest military picture ever 
shown in Paris. 

The fourth effort of Mr. Jenks, described by our lady correspondent, 
represents the Court of Louis XVI. at the Tuilleries, painted in 1874 by 
the talented Hungarian artist, Benesur, a former pupil of Piloty, and now 
a professor in the Roj'^al Academy of Munich. This picture attracted 
great attention in Germany, and was purchased by Mr. D. O. Mills, of 
this city, in whose collection it now is. Not having seen this copy, we 
know nothing of its resemblance to the original, but can scarcely think 
that the owner would consent to its being copied ; and we have no doubt 
that, like the others, it was produced from an engraving. 

The reproduction of such noble works in this manner bears about the 
game relation to art as stealing the efforts of Messrs. Fitch and Ingersol 
by the sand-lot agitator does to oratory. To the educated in art and 
literature they are equally ridiculous. Snow & May have in their window 
a new picture by Constant Mayer, "Pater Noster." It would be supposed 
from the title that the artist would have given something like a reverent 
look to the two faces represented, but he has not. They have a painful 
expression, and that is all. In technique, the work is very inferior, hav- 
ing no texture in the drapery, and being very deficient in color. 

At the same place is a photograph of Dickens, taken while in Wash- 
ington in 1868. It bears the autograph of the great novelist, which gives 
interest to it aside from its being a most excellent likeness. It fonuerly 
belonged to a notable citizen of the Capital. 

Bradford, the Arctic painter, is at Yosemite, sketching. We are alittle 
curious to see with what success ho portrays scenes a little nearer the 
North Pole than those he has given us for the past fifteen years. 

The Chinese famine is a new and terrible count in the indictment 
against the opium traffic. 



THE GERMAN SAVINOS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

DcatMcheNpnr niifl Leilibniik, No 520 CnllfonilnNtrcct, Nan 
Kraiici!k-(>. OKKKKiiti : iVesidt'iit, L. UOTTIO. Uoaiu* ok lUiiKcrmw. I-Vwi. 
jiotUiijf. Ohiis. Kohlor, U.-in. Moyor, Kdw. Knuo, Qooffiru 11. Kk'tf'TH, N. Van ItctKun, 
1, L. Shuon, Cluus Spreckuts. SecruUry, GEO. USTrE ; Attoniyy, JOUN K. 
AUBOE. May 18. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN. 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 



IJARANTEE CAFITAL, 



t»300,000. 



)(nrorM: ProNldAiit, John I'nrrott; Vlce-Pr«!«l«l«ut, Jerome 
Lii^coln ; tjocrtUiry, W. tj. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Sniitli. Loans made on 
mI EslaU) anU other Approved Seeurities. Office : No. 216 yansomo street, S&o 
■aiiciaco. Oct. 14. 



FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Ill BiiMliNtreot, Hbovc Kcnruy, O. flfahe^ Director. Ijoans 

tiX. nwdo on reul estate and other collateral Beeuritiesat current rates of 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Offloe of the Hibernia Savings and Itoan Sooietyi 

N. B. Cor. Montgomery and Post Streets, 
San JPranctsco, July 34, 187S. 
Vtn re;rnlar ineetlug* of the Bunrd of Directors, held this 

V day, a bivideiid at the rate of 1}^ per cunt, per animai waj declared on all De- 
sits for the six months ciidiii^ Julv 'ilst, 1S7S, payable from and after this date, and 
c from Federal Ta.v. [.July '11. \ EUW. MARTIN, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Iasonic Savings and I.oait Bank, No. 6 Post street, SKa- 
sonic Temple, Ssvn Francisco. — At a nieethif,' of the Board of Directors of this 
ik, held July '20, 187S, a Dividend was declared at the rate of seven and one-half 
I per cent. i>er annum on term deposits, and six and three#tenth3((i ;J-10) per cent, 
annum on ordinary deposits, for the serai-annual term endiny July 21, 1878, pay- 

on and after July 25, 1878, free from Federal Tax. 

uly 27. H. T. GRA\*ES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

'avln^s and liOau Society, U19 Clay Htr«et.»At ameetingr of 

) the Board of Directors, held this day, a dividend, free of Federal Tax, of seven 

1 one-half (7^) per cent per annum, was declared on all deposits, for the term end- 
: June 29th, 1878, payable on and after July IBth, 1878. 

luly 13. CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 



noma Democrat says the S. F. and N. P. KailroacT pays $o,OdO per mile taxes, and 
the N. P. C, a narrow-gausre, pays SS,750 per mile.— ^The Siocktoil Independent 
states that the wheat market exhibits no especial change in price, $1 62^ being the 
top notch for the choicest milling- wheat. The receipts continue brisk. ^^The av- 
erage diily receipts at the Farmers' warehouse for the last week were 251^ tons. 
The receipts this week will !)« still greater.— C^/fwa 5un.— Hajingis yet in active 
progress down the coast, and in the vicinity of the Cove several presses are at work 
bailing: hay for shipment.— ,Ue;i(ioano 5e«c.0rt.^— The potatoe crop down the coast 
is also in flourishing condition, and if the fogs contuiue as heavy as they bet^n a 
large yield of late potatoes is imminent.— /6.^— There is any quantity of fruit in 
market, just now, and it is sold very cheap.— ^o^a/io T^me.*.—— Shipping wheat con- 
tinues steady, with a good demand and prices steady.— 76.-^— The Omaha Herald 
gives the following figures relating to stock raising as one of the chief industries of 
the country: California, 050,000 head; Colorado, 550.000; Utah, 350,000; Montana, 
309,000; Wyoming, 225,000; Washington, 200,000, and Oregon 175,000— a toUal of 
2,150,000 head. This immense number, increased by the Texas return, makes be- 
tween seven and eight million beeves beiug fattened for the Eastern market. These 
cattle are chiefly in the hands or a few men, for only a few fally understand the 
business of stock raising and the profits that it retums.^^The first wheat brought 
into Albany this season was delivered at the City Mills on the 23d of August. Last 
year the first arrival was on the 23th of July. — Albany {Oregon) Democrat.'^-' X 
project is on foot and being rapidly pushed ahead, looking to the reopening of the 
Holcomb Valley gold mines. A company has been organized for the purpose of 
prospecting these mines, and if there is gold there it is to be produced. — San Ber- 
nardino Times.-^ i'he Spring Gulch mine is paying well. Water being scarce, the 
mill is running only five stamps at present. The rock is good, and the mine is being 
worked with system and economy. — Tuolumne Independent.^'—Tiie New Albany is 
putting down its shaft 300 feet deeper.— i6. 



The personal appearance and dress of Joaquin Miller, who is now 
ia London, are in every way as remarkable as his writinjfs. He has a 
fine square forehead, long deep-set gray eyes, and an expression of mingled 
defiance and melancholy altogether very difficult to describe. He wears 
his hair very much longer than is customary in this country, and his chest- 
nut beard grows in picturesque luxuriance whither it listeth. His man- 
ners are preeminently the manners :>i a child of Nature ; but his conver- 
sation, though otten wild and incoherent, never degenerates into common- 
place, and is invariably of things, instead of persons. We are told that 
he has been constantly solicited, while at Rome, to sit as a model for pic- 
tures of the Saviour, and that his head has found its way, in this man- 
ner, into a great many sacred modern paintings. — World. 

■We cannot understand how the report got abroad that the Cosmo- 
politan Hotel was to be closed, when there was not the slightest founda- 
tion for it. It has too many trienda and patrons to render such action ne- 
cessary. No where can more comfort or convenience be found, and we 
think that the change from the American to the European plan will serve 
to render it even a more desirable place of resort than it is at present. 
"We are glad to learn that H. H. Pearson retains management, and that 
the Cosmopolitan is not to be one of the things of the past. 



Medicinal Food. PANCREATIC EMUI^ION. 
. & MOORE. For Persons sufifering-from 



Prepared by SAVORY 



Consnmptioii aud Wasting' Diseases, and for counteracting the ten- 
dency thereto. Nourishes the system by the introduction of stable solid Fatg, the 
Necessary Food iu Consnmption, and takes precedence of fluid fats, 
oils, and oily Emulsions of all kuids. 
Appetite, Streugtb and Weight are increased, and digestion in all 
cases improved by taking it. 
Pmcreatlc Einnlsion is prescribed by the Medical Profession in all parts of 
the world, and is prepared by 
Savory A Moore, 143, New Bond street, London, and sold by all Chemists. 
[July 6.] 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS J.ETTER AND 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



THE NEWSPAPER, 

Turn to the press — its teeming sheets survey. 
Big with the wonders of each passing day ; 
Births, deaths and weddingfs, forgeries, fires and ^vrecks, 
Harangues and hailstones, brawk and broken necks. 
****** 

Trade hardly deems the busy day begun 
Till his keen eye along the sheet has run ; 
The blooming daughter throws her needle by, 
And reads her schoolmate's marriage with a sigh ; 
While the grave mother puts her glasses on 
And gives a tear to some old crone that's gone. 
The Preacher, too, his Sunday theme lays down, 
To know what liist new folly fills the town ; 
Lively or sad, life's meanest, mightiest things, 
The fate of fighting cocks, or fighting kings. 

— Cliai'Jcs Sprague. 

A FIGHT BETWEEN A HINDOO AND A TIGER. 
Now that -we have brought the Hindoo to Europe, says the Loudon 
Sporting Times, to fight the Russian Bear, an authentic account of a fight 
that took place once between a Hindoo and a tiger might be interesting. 
The following is a description of the fray: The man wore no clothing 
except coarse linen trowsers, and was armed with a ponderous knife and a 
amall conical shield. The travelers accompanied him to the lair of the 
animal. As soon as we reached the spot, the man boldly leaped into the 
hollow, at the same time uttering a shrill cry, in order to arouse his en- 
emy from his slumbers. Upon seeing its resolute asTgressor advancing, 
the animal raised itself upon its forelegs with a terrific howl. As the 
little Hindo continued to approach, which he did slowly, and with his 
dark eyes keenly fixed upon the face of his formidable foe, the tiger rose 
to its full hight and began to lash its sides furiously with its tail ; yet it 
evidently appeared to be in a state of great embarrassment. Still the 
man advanced deliberately and undauntedly; the uneasiness and rage of 
the excited beast increased mth every step ; at length it crouched, evi- 
dently with a determination to make its terrific spring. The man sud- 
denly stopped, when the tiger paused, turned up its head, and, uttering a 
horrible noise between a snarl and a howl, made one step forward and 
sprang toward its victim, wlio instantly bent his body, received the ani- 
mal's paws upon his shield, dashed the knife into his bo'iy, and fell under, 
but almost entirely beyond the extremities of his wounded enemy. The 
creature turned upon its back; the little Hindoo regained his feet in an 
instant, striking the prostrate tiger with astonishing quickness and pre- 
cision a desperate blow upon the throat, which completely severed the 
windpipe, at the same moment springing with the quickness of thought 
beyond the reach of the monster's claws. The tiger died almost imme- 
diately. 

His Excellency the Hoa John Welsh, the TTnited States Minister 
presided on June 20th at the 120th anniversary of the Orphan Working 
School, Haverstock Hill. At the dejeuner the chairman proposed the 
health of the Queen, remarking that in place of the animosities of the 
past there had been substituted the most friendlv relations between En- 
gland and America. The people whom he represented now recognized Her 
Majesty as one who was identified with their best interests, who was true 
in her friendship to them, and who was well worthy of the exalted posi- 
tion she now held as the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland and Empress 
or India. — European Mail. 



BANKS. 



NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

SAN FJRAJfCISCO, CAJL. 

Paid Up Capital $10,000,000, Gold. 

Surplus (U.S. Bonds) $2,500,000, Gold- 

DIRECTORS: 

XiOuis SCcLane President. | J. C. Flood Vice-President. 

John W. Hackay, W. S. O'Brien, James G. Pair. 

Cashier '. H. W. Qlenny. 

Asrent at Virg-inia, Nevada George A. King:. 

Agents at New York (62 Wallst.)- -C. T. Christensen, C. W. Churcli. 

Issues Commercial and Travelers' Credits, avaflahle in any part of the world. 

Makes Transfers of Money by Telegraph and Cable, and Draws Exchange at cus- 
tomary usances. This Rank has special facilities for dealing in Bullion. 

EXOHANUE on the Principal Cities throujcliout the United States, Europe, Japan, 
China and the East Indies, the Australian Colonies and New Zealand, and on Hon- 
olulu, Hawaii, 



New York Bankers.. 



( TuE Bank of New York, N. E. A. 

\ AilERICAN ExCtlANGB NAT. BaNK. 

T«n,i«„ T>-,„i^^« J Messrs. Suith, Payne (SiSmitus. 

London Bankers j Tub UsiON Ba^k of London. 

[May 25.] . 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $5,000,000, 

WM. AI.TORD President. 

THOMAS BBOW^r, Casbier | B. SIUBBAT, Jr., AssH Casbier 

Aqents : 

New York, Agency of the Bank of Calforuia ; Boston, Tremont National Bank 
Chicago, Union National Bank ; St. Louis, Boatman's Saving Bank ; New Zealand, 
the Bank of New Zealand ; London, China, Japan, India and Australia, the Oriental 
Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Corregpondenta in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct on Lon- 
don, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, 
Amsterdam, St. Petersburgh, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, I/Ocamo, Mel- 
bourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, Shanghai, Yokohama, Nov, 4. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Iucorporatetl by Royal Charter.— Capital pal<l np, 91,800,- 
000, with [wwer to increase to $10,000,000. Southeast corner California and San- 
some streets. Head Office- -T East India Avenue, London. Branches— Portland, Or- 
egon; Victtvriaand Cariboo, British Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened subject to Check 
and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted available in all parts of 
the world. Approved Bills discounted and advances made on good collateral security. 
Draws direct at current rates upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents 
as follows : 

New York, Cliicago and Canada— Bank of Montreal; Liverpool— North and South 
Wales Bank ; Scotland— British Linen Company ; Ireland — Bank of Ireland ; Mex- 
ico and South America- London Bank of Mexico aud South America ; China and 
Japan— Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and Oriental Bank ; Australia 
and New Zealand— Bank uf Australasia, Commercial Banking Comimny of Sydney, 
and English, Scottish and Australian Chartered Bank. 

WM. H. TILLINGHAST, FRED'K TOWNSEND, 

May 18. Managers. 

FIRST NATIONAL GOLO BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital 83,000,000, Gol<l. President, B. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D, Callaghan ; Cashier, E. D. Morgan. 

Directors :— R. C. Woolworth, D. Callaghan, C, G. Hooker, C. Adolph Low, Peter 
Donahue, D. D. Colton, Edward Martin, James Moffitt, N. Van Bergen. 

Correspondents — London: Earing Bros. &Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman&Co. Paris: Uottinguer& Co, New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Elackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deiwsit. E.\change for sale on the prineipa! 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, CluLa and Jajjan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rates of Exchange. Jan. 19. 

LOWOON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, LIMITED. 

Capital, 85,00«,000,of wblcb 83,000,000 iM fully paid np a» 
present capital. Reserve Fund, S4S0,O00. San Francisco Office, 424 Califor- 
nia street ; London Office, 22 Old Broad street. Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER ; 
Assistant Manager, CAMILO MARTIN; Cashier, WILLIAM STEEL. London 
Bankers, Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank ; New York, Drexel, 
Morgan & Co. ; Boston, Third National Bank. This Bank is prepared to transact 
all kinds of General Banking and Exchange Business in London and San Frd,neiseo, 
and between said cities and all parts of the world. March 30. 



THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, LIMITED. 



422" 



California street, San Francisco.— liOudon Office, 8 

, _ Angel Court ; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

Authorized Capital Stock, $6,000,000. Will receive Deposits, open Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, ) Mini.<«rs 

IGN. STEINHART, ] "=^"^^^"- 
P. N. LILIENTHAL, Cashier. Pet 4. 

A. J. Platb. H. a. Plate. W. B. Cotbbl. 

A. J. PLATE & GO., 

Importers and Dealers in Gnns, Bifles, Pistols, Sportlngr 
Material, { 

Masonic, I. O. O. P. and Military Goods of Every Description. j 

— SOLE AOENTS for TUP. — i 

Celebrated Iteinington At'Tits* 

510 Sacramento street, between Montgomery and Sansome streets, S. F. 
^g= New Work Made to Order. July 13. 



Aug. 10. 1878. 



CALIFOUNIA ADVEUTISEH. 




REAL ESTATE. 
Notwithstanding the fact that the stock market is exhibiting; an ac- 
vity to which it has long been a stranger, anil that the outlook for busi- 
ess generally is brightening, real estate, as a marketable commodity, con- 
nues dull aa ever. This, however, is an anomaly which cannot continue. 
P"e venture to predict, judgincfnot only by the signs of the times, but by 
Hudden activity recently displayed in the erection of buildings in some 
E the suburban portions of tiie city, that a few weeks hence will bring 
ew buyers into the market, producing, of necessity, an improvement in 
rices. There is no earthly reason why real estate should continue so de- 
ressed as it is. On the contrary it should and must improve. Now is 
ie time to buy it, and if the fortunate dabblers in Bodie, Sierra Nevada, 
I hoc fjtiius omne, take our advice, they will salt some of their lucky earn- 
igs in real estate, where neither tricks nor "points" do corrupt, and 
'here '* bears " break not through nor steal. 

The death of Mr. Michael Keese will cause a large offering in the 
larket, probably at auction, of a splendid line of property, embracing, 
ar the most part, improved business and residence lots in the center of 
he city, the Mission and Western Additions, and the Beach and Water 
)t surveys. His will provides that all bis real property be sold imme- 
iately. The inventory of it, as published in the morning papers, occu- 
ies nearlj' an entire column in length, and represents many millions in 
alne. This, by the way, is in contrast with his bequests to public char- 
lies, which are enumerated in a few printed lines, and although liberal 
nougb, are not nearly so great as was generally anticipated, especially 
[>r Califomian purposes, and do not aggregate one tithe of the value of 
is immense estate. 

We note the following among the leading sales of real estate recorded 
uring the past week : 
lOt on northwesterly line of Minna street, commencing 295 feet southwest 

from 3d St., thence sw 20 bj'TO ft. in depth, with a small frame house S 3,200 

>ne-ninth of the Russ House proi>erty and improvements 119,222 

louse and lot on nw line of Clementina street, commencing 1974 ^^^^ "^ 

from 6th street, thence ne 57J feet by 70 feet in depth 7,200 

L splendid house and lot on ne corner of Pine street and Van Ness avenue, 

thence n 103 IJ-IS feet by I37J feet in depth (a decided banjain) 41,000 

Inimproved lot on' e line of Howard street, 225 feet n from 18th street, thence 

n 50 by 122^ feet 6,000 

louae ami lot on e line of Valencia street, commencing 110 feet s from Va- 
lencia street, thence s 50 by 90 feet in depth 10,700 

iOt 38, Block 139, Central Park Homestead 750 

louse and lot on e line of Broderick street, commencing 92 feet s from Pine 

street, thence s 21A by S74 feet deep (paid for on the installment pla,n). . 5,050 
louse and lot on se line of Folsora street, commencing 57^ feet ne from 4th 

street, thence ne 20 by 80 feet 5,150 

iOt on s line of Post street, commencing 110 feet e from Polk street, thence 

e 30^ by 120 feet 5,250 

x>t unimproved on ne comer Taylor and Ciay streets, thence e 20 feet by 

112A feet deep (this sale was made a year ago) 32,000 

iouse and lot on s line of Post street, 143 3-12 feet w from Webster street, 

thence w 24 by 137i feet (paid for in installments) 5,600 

louse and lot on w line of Webster street, commencing 112^ feet s from 

McAllister street, theuce s 24 by 84^ feet 4,250 

Money on improved city property is plentifully loaned in tbe Savings 
Banks at from 7 % to 9 % per annum. 



SAVINGS AND LOAN. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

I 'VoiitttoheMpnr uikI liellibauk. No naa Caliroriilitfilrect.Naii 

I / Fninoisc-iK Okkicbhs : I'resiUont, L. OOTTIO. lk>Aiii) nv UittKtT^oiw. Frwl. 
It-.K-linif. Chiis. Kohlor, Dan. Moyer, Edw, Knuu, Ueor{(u H. Egircrn, N. Van HiTjfcn, 
il 1,. Simon, Claua Spreckels. Socrctury, GEO. LETrE : Attonioy, JOHN K. 
JAKltOE^ May 18. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

GUARA^TTEE CAl'ITAL, 



8300,000. 

OfllrerN: PreHlileiiC, John Parrott ; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lii'culii ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attunicy, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
KlmI EsUit*} and other Approved Securities. OlHuu : No. 215 Sansorao street, San 
Fninclsco. Oct. 14. 



411 

iiitcrust. 



FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

BnNli Ntreet, above Kearny, O. Mahe, Director. I/oans 

mado on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

OffloB of the Hibsrnia Savings and Loan Societyj 

N. E. Cor. Montgromery and Post Streets, 
San Francisco, ^nty 24, 1S7S. 

At a re^rnlar ineetiugror ttie Bunril of Director.**, held this 
day, a Dividend at the rate of 7J per cunt. )ier annum was declared on all De- 
liosits for the six months endin? Jul^ 21st, 1S78, payable from and after this date, and 
freo from Federal Tax. [July 27. ] EUW. MARTIN, Secretary . 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Savings and I.oau Bank, No. 6 Post street, Bla- 
soniu Temple, San Francisco, — At a meetiiij,' of the Board of Directors of this 
li;uik, held July 20, 187S, a Dividend was declared at the rate of aeren and one-half 
(7A) per cent, per annum on term deposits, and six and threaitenth3(6 .3-10) per cent, 
per annum on ordinary deposits, for the serai-annual term endinj; July 21, 1878, pay- 
ahlc on and after July 25, 1878, free from Federal Tax. 
July 27. H. T. GRA\-ES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savln$rs and I^oan Society, 019 Clay street.—At a meeting- of 
the Board of Directors, held this day, a dividend, free of Federal Tax, of seven 
and one-half (7A) per cent per annum, was declared on all deposits, fur the tenu end- 
iiif,' June 29th, 187S, payable on and after July 15th, 1878. 
July 13. CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

French Saving's and Ijuau Society, 411 Bush street.— The 
French Savinifs and Loan Society has declared a Dividend of seven and one- 
half (7^) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, for the half-year ending June 30, 
1S78, payable on and after July 17th, 1878. By order. 
July 20. GUSTAVE MAHE, Director. 

MECHANICS' INSTITUTE. 

Thirteenth Industrial Exhibition, San FranoisoOf Cal., 1878. 

The Mana^'erN have the honor to annoancc to the Pnhllc 
that the THIRTEENTH GRAND EXHIBITION OF SCIENCE, ART AND IN- 
DUSTRY, g-iven under the auspices of the Mechanics' Institute, will open at the Pa- 
vilion, on Market, Eighth and Mission streets, on Tuesday, August 13th. 

Great and unusual attractions will be presented to visitors. Mining, Agricultural 
and other Machinery will he in motion. Pacific Coast Manufactures, Minerals and 
Products of the Soil will be fully represented, beside many new and interesting nov- 
elties never before exhibited on this Coast. 

The Art Department will be under the supervision of the San Francisco Art 
Association, a guarantee for excellence and completeness. Local Art will be specially 
represented, as also works of noted foreign artists, selected from the private galleries 
of this city. 

The Horticultural Garden, so popular heretofore, will be made still more 
attractive this year by the addition of many new features. 

The JTInsic."Each afternoon and evening a first-class Instrumental Concert will 
be civen hy the best soloists and accomplished musicians of this city, with a daily 
change of programme of the best and most popular music. 

No expense or pains will be spared by the Management thot will add to the com- 
fort or convenience of visitors, 

Applications for space or information can be obtained from the Secretarj', at the 
office, 27 Post street. IRVING M. SCOTT, President. 

J. H. Culver, Secretary. [July 20.] J. H. GILMORE, Superintendent. 

THE AVERILL MIXED PAINT 

IS manufactured from strictly pure White licad. Zinc, and 
Pure Linseed Oil, to which is added Water Glass, which chemically unites the 
ingredients and holds them in solution, so they cannot separate. As a house paint 
it has no equal, producing a brilliant glossy finish, impervious to the weather, and 

Will Last Twice as Loxig: 
as any other paint made. It is of pure white, and any Shade or Colordesired, mixed 
ready for the brush, ao that any one can apply it. 

Our wagon and machinery paints, from the more common colors to the finest ver- 
milion, are specially desirable. 

Our fire-proof roof, harn and bridge paint, manufactured from oxide of iron, is the 
best and cheapest paint for the purpose that can be produced. 

Put up in J, J, 1 and b gallon cans, and in barrels, sold by the gallon. Send for 
sample card of colors and price list. Address, 

CAIilFORNIA PAINT COAKPANY, 
July 13. 329 MARKET STREET, San Francisco. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH, 

Successors to John O. Ilod^e A Co., Ntationers, Boolcsellers 
and Importers, Blank Book Manufacturers and Commercial Printers, 327, 329 
and 331 SANSOME STREET. Special attention given to the Stationery Wants of 
Banks, Insurance Offices, etc. , and estimates promptly furnished upon request. 
[April 20.] ^__ 

CASTLE BROTHERS, 

ESTABLISHED IN THE TEAK 1850. 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Nos. ai3 and 215 
Front street, San Francisco. ^ Jan. 13. 

R. H. LLOYD, 

Attorney-at-Iia-Wi Rooxu 13, Nevada Block. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS^ LETTER AND 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



THEATRICAL, ETC. 



Baldvcin's Academy ot Miisic. — Dearer than Life is one of the 
■weakest productions of Mr. Byron's fertile genius, and bears the marks 
of a haaty and somewhat disconnected composition. Byron's great fea- 
ture was character— notably, " Sir Simon Simple " — originally written for 
Sothem, but acted with great success by the author — whilst others, especially 
the low comedy parts, were written for character actors of acknowledged 
merit,8uchasMr. James, the original "Middlewickof 0«?'5o2/5. The part of 
** Michael Grarner,"in Dearertkan Life, conveys the impression of an unfin- 
ished conception, carelessly finished to suit a change of circumstances. Mr. 
Stoddart basmadesome alterations from the original to suit his own special 
part ; but before the play can obtain a general interest, it will have to be remod- 
eled entirely. It is not what one would call a good " all round " drama, 
and yet the principal character has scarcely sufficient prominence to hold 
the attention of the audiecce through two long hours. Mr. Stoddart's 
" Michael Garner " was a considerable improvement upon his "Money- 
penny " in the Long Strike. It was quiet yet forcible, and very carefully 
sustained. He has an intensity and thoroughness about him which is 
very refreshing, and his lights and shades of character are so hlendid as 
to render his characterizations at times intensely natural, notably in the 
last act, where he comes in cold and bunfrry and tries to hide his suffer- 
ings from his sorrowing niece. The drunken scene was very well acted 
also, being suflSciently forcible without exceeding the bounds of natural- 
ness, though the transition to sobriety was just a little too sudden to be 
lifelike. With such a character actor as Mr. Stoddart to cope with, the 
wonderful success of Mr. Mackay as "Ben. Gamer" surpassed all his 
former efforts. This is certainly one of the greatest character effects he 
has ever succeeded in producing, his identity being totally lost in that of 
the poor old drunken bummer, whose hacking cough and bleared features 
interested the audience even more than the clever eccentricities of the 
star. He was fi-equently interrupted by bursts of applause. Mr. Heme, 
as *' Bob Gassitt," spoiled a part which might have been made very inter- 
esting. Very rarely he seems to hit the true conception of a character. 
Miss Louise Sylvester as " Lucy " was alternately kittenish and broken- 
hearted, with her favorite monotone well in hand throughout the whole 
play. The way she carries that wearisome falsetto throughout an entire 
performance is wonderfully painful. If she could only be induced to re- 
sume her natural voice occasionally, it would be positively refreshing. 
Mrs. Farren played "Mrs. Garner," in one of her quaintest of quaint old 
dresses, for all it was worth, and the rest of the company filled their 
parts with proportionate success. On Monday evening will be produced 
FourchamhauU <fc Co. 

Busb-street Theater. — Haverly's Minstrels succeeded Tony Pastor 
Troupe at this house last Monday, and opened their second season to an 
excellent house. The company has been added to by the engagement of 
Sweatnam, Dougherty and Williams. The first part of the programme 
was unusually tame, dull and flat; but it had a capital ending in Dougher- 
ty's " Gilmore at the Trocadero," his imitation of the great leader being 
intensely funny, and was I'eally the best part of the evening's entertain- 
ment. The rest of the performance was not up to the usual excellence of 
this popular troupe. Everything seemed to drag. Their former life and 
spirit were not infused into what they did. Dougherty, in his stump 
speech, tried to talk the audience to death by the profuse use of long 
words, without iutroducing a single point for over ten minutes to at- 
tract the risibilities of the audience. Towards the end of his harangue, 
however, he succeeded better, and showed that he was possessed with con- 
siderable humorous ability, but he has to work himself up pretty well be- 
fore any of it leaks out. Billy Sweatnam was, as usual, very funny, but 
would do well to introduce some new features into his part of the iiro- 
gramme. Gus Williams was good, but there has been so much in his line 
of business of late that he was scarcely appreciated. His sketches should 
be rewritten and improved upon. The quartette — Dixon, Kapier, Freeth 
and Eoe — sang well together, but the pieces selected for this week were 
so monotonous that what they did fell flat. They have nearly eradicated 
the one drawback to their former efforts— the preponderance of bass. 
Dixon's new song, " Baby Asleep," will never be as popular as "Baby 
Mine," having no real melody to recommend it. Frank Cushman's Aged 
Darkey is becoming wearisome, and the ape-like make-up is an insult to 
the African race. Welch and Eice gave a new sketch. The burlesque of 
" Cupid in Hot Water" was the finishing touch, and has nothing in it 
worthy of note. 

California Theater. — Diplomacy^ in its fourth week, has not received 
the patronage it deserved, and has proved that, although the public of 
San Francisco is essentially one of theatrical tastes and inclinations, its 
larger half are scarcely educated up to the finer excellencies of this play 
of plays. Very rarely are we treated to such a finely constructed drama 
so perfectly acted ; and those who have seen Diplomacy played by the 
present company, will have had a glimpse of what the stage and its vota- 
ries should be— but, unfortunately, are not. Miss Jeffries-Lewis has cor- 
rected the slight tendency to rrfht which was the only drawback to her 
really wonderful performance of the part of the "Countess Zicka." This 
lady has fairly won a place among the leading dramatic artistes of the 
American stage. Mr. Shannon continues to play the diplomat "Stein" 
in his remarkably characteristic manner, and Mr. Warde has strengthened 
the firm bold be obtained upon the feelings of his audiences at the com- 
mencement of the season. Last night, for the benefit of Mr. Montague, 
False Shame was placed upon the programme, and the same play will be 
repeated at to-day's matinee. This evening the programme will include 
the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet, and the third act from the Lady 
of Lyons, with Miss Jeffries-Lewns as "Juliet" and "Pauline," and Mr. 
Warde as "Romeo" and "Claude Melnotte." Maggie Mitchell opens 
Monday evening in Mignon. 

Flatt's HalL — Last night a very interesting entertainment was inau- 
gurated at this Hall, entitled the "Polyrama. " It really consists of seventy 
exquisite photographic views thrown upon a screen, the entire width and 
hight of the stage, from the powerful lenses of two huge magic lanterns. 
The subject is the Paris Exposition, forty-three of the views being de- 
voted to the interior building, thereby giving those have not been able to 
visit the fair capital of the world an excellent idea of the glories of art 
and mechanism on exhibition there. An able lecture, delivered by Mr. 
Alfred Balch, whose sonorous elocution is so widely known among news- 
paper men, adds the finishing touch to an enterprise at once enjoyable 
and instructive. 




if selling 
vada," a 
jThe only 
and the 
iraid of, 
have for 



_ . - ,^^^^ hereafter 

on Sunday evenings, at Union Hall, on Howard street, commencing on 
the 11th inst. First-class talent has been engaged, and doubtless they 
will be appreciated by our music-loving public. Admission, ten cents. 



A grand dramatic and musical entertainment will be given by 
Miss Lotta Chissold and Mr. J. W. Clough, aided by sixteen well-known 
artists of San Francisco, at the Metropolitan Temple, on Friday evening, 
August 16th, 1878. Tickets, 50c. 



The Sportsman's Clubof California is doing good service in guarding 
theinforcement of the game laws. The Secretary and one of the members of 
the Club recently found, in one of the city markets, two female deer 
offered for sale, which they confiscated and sent to the Orphan Asylum. 
It is against the law to shoot female deer for four years from the present 
year. 

Krug Champagne. — Private Cuvee, in quarts and pints; Shield — 
Krug — in quarts and pints; Premiere Qualite, in quarts and pints. For 
sale by Hellman Bros. & Co., corner Front and Jackson. 

An elegant assortment of Gold Watches and Chains at Ander- 
son & Randolph's, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Barton & I.awIor, Slaiiag-ers; Bartou Hill, Acting' Manager. 
Monday Evening, Aus'ust 12th, everj' evening- during- the week, and at Satur- 
day Matinee. Brief Engag-ement of the Supreme Favorite, MISS MAGGIE MITCH- 
ELL, who will appear as MIGNON, in a dramatic adaptation of Ambroise Thomas' 
opera of that name, founded on Goethe's masterpiece and chiefest gem, supported by 
the favorite actor, MR. WILLIAM HARRIS, and the followiui* members of the New 
Company of the Califoniia Theater: MISS MARIE PRESCOTT, MR RUSSELL S. 
BASSETT, MR FREDERIC BOCK, MR. F. G. COTTER and MR. CHARLES W. 
BUTLER. New Scenery, Costumes and Properties ! Seats at the Box Office. 

BUSH STREET THEATER. 

Charles E. I^cke, Proprietor.— Ladie!*' AEatlnec this (Sat- 
urday) afternoun. Everj' evening this week, including Wednesday and Satur- 
day Matinees, HAYERLVS MINSTRELS. New Combination. The New Company 
includes GUS WILLIAMS. HUGHEY DOUGHERTY, BILLY SWEATNAM, and all 
the favorites. Seats at bo.\-otfice six days in advance. Aug. 10. 

BALDWIN'S THEATER. 

Thomas Magnire, Manager: Fred. Lyster, Aeting STauager; 
G. K. Chipman. Treasurer. Last two niyhts of MR. J. H. STODDART. This 
Saturday evening, August 10. DEARER THAN LIFE. "Michael Garuer," bv MR. 
J. H. STODDART. To be followed fly Moneypenny's great scenes in THE LONG 
STRIKE "Lawyer Moneypenny," by MR. STODDART. This Saturday afternoon, 
last Stoddart Matinee— Same Bill. Sunday— Last appearance of MR. STODDART. 
[Aug. 10.] 

MADAME JULIA MELVILLE SNYDER, 

£*~t O ISasou street, I>etweeu Bush and Sntter.-- Vocal Music 

Vf JLtJ for Opera. Concert or Parlor. Piano and Elocution. Dramatic Elocution 
and Voice Culture Specialties. Terms made known at residence. May 2r. 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



ABSENT TBT PREaSNT. 

In aluenoe it c«>mw, liko a nnft, nwuet dream— 

Tlittt preaentti frtir, ttnit faot' »o bright — 
It Cornell like the Doimd of a ripnlitit; Htruaiu 

HeaM OH a ilrowsy SuininorM ni^'ht 
By a wttiuleivr. tired, who stops to n-at 

'Mill flow.TH that l>looui, and »U\n that «hino, 
And who lovin;,'ly fetds hiinsidf Xutiire's ^est, 

Aud kiiowit that hi^ Kvit^inK i-"* nil diviue; 
Divine, not liiimun, both titno and phtce, 

The (•ea^-o he feoln, and the hu^ih that falls, 
A» he watches the shadowa creep over apace. 

While the d;iy her last ^leau] recnlla. 

A dream of the ni>;ht, ah! the moruin>? breaks, 

The traveler starU on hiii way a^^ain. 
But his Boul 'lA refreithed as the bright sun wakea, 

He is fearless, stronii, relieved of his pain. 
And auch is my dream, an inttuence sweet, 

That streni,'then8, alaal but will pass away. 
Ah! ni) earthly joy come:j to us coraplete, , 

Man'tt fairet^t no|>e cnn last but a day ; 
Yet who for thirt would forego the rich thrill 

Of hoiw or of love in their bloom? 
Come shallow or shine, I welcome them still. 

And defy the dark shadows that loom. 
Sm Franciico, Jubj 20, 1S7S. —Htrry A. CartwriglU. 

EVES GRAND -DAUGHTER. ' 

Editor News I«etter: Si it: In a recent artiuie in the News Letter, 
ead.d '■ I'oul Birvls, etc.," and commenting on the London letters of 

ciTtain Sunday paper, due justice was not done the lady — pardon, the 
er^on who writes tnem — for there is one thinj; she certainly deserves 
redit for, and that is her acumen in choosing the moat suitable noiii de 
(nine that she could jwsitibly write over. Verily, she is a w^orthy 
■ntiant of old Mother Eve. The latter thieved and lied, but she 
nly wtole apples, and lied to hide her theft. The former fitches articles 
Imodt verbatim from London journals, steals the characters of men and 
'omen, none of whom wt)uld condescend to speak to her; and certainly 
tie can never be accused of tellinfj the truth, though ehe sometimes 
teals it. 

lu addition to the qualities inherited from the original Eve, the f^rand- 
aii^'hter, by her superior educational advantages, so far surpasses the old 
idy that she indulges in promiscuous slanders, aud is carefully fostering 

taste for foul stories and filthy insinuations, all of which the virtuous 
nd I'nlightened proprietors of the journal of which she is correspondent 
erm " spicy," and consider fit reading for the girls and young lailieg of 
he Paciti i-Slope. Yours, etc. 

e A Lover op Decency. 

^t I 

'^t^ AN ENGUSH MODEL FARM. 

A number of Members of Parliament interestecLin agriG«ltBFe,Ue- 
ently visited the model farm of Mr. Mechi's, known as the " Tiptree 
Ia!l " farm. Mr. Mechi, who is now in his seventy -seventh year, inl re- 
eiving his visitors, gave them a statement of the rise and progress of his 
(lace since it had passed into his hands, from which we extract the fol- 
Bwing: He said that he had purchased the place in 1841 at S125 per acre, 
.nd that it was now valued, without the house and gardens, at S250 per 
<3re. His first act of improvement was to remove all fences and trees, 
Irain every field, and then deeply subsoil and well manure the land. 
Jood roads were made, and suflScient buildings erected, In 1868 he sold 
lis wheat crop, with the straw, for S146 per acre, or S21 more per acre 
.hail he had paid for the land. He has resided on the place for 35 years. 
Ml his children were born there, and, thanks to drainage and open fields, 
vith pure air and good water, his doctor's bills have been kept at a mini- 
num. The example of Mr. Mechi can be followed with good results 
I very where. 

Owing to ill health, Mr. Breckenridge, of Breckenridge & Yost, will 
lOon retire from the San Francisco Board, and for the future attend to 
he office affairs of the firm; while Mr. Dan. Z. Yost will take his seat in 
;he Board. Both are very popular, shrewd and enterprising, and as they 
u-e backed by unlimited capital they are likely to still further increase 
iheir already enormous business. Their success hitherto has been as re- 
nai'kable as it has been well deserved. 



Dr. Jessup, one of the leading Dentists of the city, announces that 
lis priced will now be reduced as low as is consistent with legitimate prae- 
;ice. As an operator and manufacturer of sets of teeth, Dr. Jessup has 
;ertainly no superior on this coast, and he shows his appreciation of the 
jffeets of the present dull times on the masses of the people by placing 
tiis services at their disposal on terms thoroughly within their reach. 

J. M. Xritob&eld 8c Co. seem bound to keep ahead of the ordinary 
run of tailoring establishments. They have just received another lot of 
new and nobby goods. Some of the patterns are neater than anything we 
have had here for years. The elegant style in which this firm makes np 
their suits has made them the fashionable tailors of San Francisco. The 
place is 415 Montgomery street. 

ff Messrs. McNally & Hawkins, Plumbers and Gasfittera, at No. 607 
Market street, are prepared to do all work entrusted to their care in the 
most thorough manner and with the greatest promptness. They are ex- 

Eerienced men in their business, and employ none but the best workmen, 
ence they may be relied upon to give entire satisfaction. 

At the free dispensary of Dr. Albert Hiller, No. 12 Bagley Place, 
during the past four months over two hundred and fifty patients have 
been successfully treated, and furnished with medicine free of charge. 

Mr. John Ainsley, of this city, died yesterday at Sonera, Tuolumne 
county, after a short illness, aged 23 years and 6 months. 



C. A Kmnkner's Ked Rubber Stamps, 137 Montgomery street, S. F. 
WiU remove to 320 Sansome street August 15th. 



[roMMPSIOATFD.] 

THE DARIEN CANAL. 
The French Surveying Expedition along the D&rion and Panama 

Iwthmiiscrt promise's to rosult in the inau>;uration of work on the <"jinal 
which is to unitf the Atlantic to the E'luufic Ocuan, In a former Tiuinb«r 
of the Nfics Lrtirr we referred to the Hurveya which had been madu, and 
thf conection of De Lessepa with tho French project. 

But littltt has been ttaid of the expodition, and the route which it has 
seleirtod has only been mjyle known through an application for a franchise 
to the Ooh)nibian (JovL-rnnient The location deemed most favorable is 
that reeomiueudLtl by the United Ststes Surveying Expedition, crossing 
the lower portion of the Darion Peninsula. Whether this has been chosen 
as the site i>f the canal, however, is by iu> ideans certain. It may be re- 
garded simply as favorable, and the effort to secure a right of way be a 
mejumre of precaution to cut off competition. 

It ia fit that the great engineer wlio united the Red Sea with the Mediter- 
ranean should farther the great project on this Continent. While neither 
the United States ni)r (Ireat Britain would consent to natural manipula- 
tion of a highway between the two great oceans, there can be no objec- 
tions to French ownershijj of the Darien Canal, particularly under the 
guidance of the great Lesseps. It is, however, a matter so closely con- 
nected witli the interests of American commerce, that no defiinte steps 
will probably be taken until the views of our Government are obtained. 

San Francisco has a dee|ier interest in this Canal than any other city. 
So long as our commerce is mainly with the civilized nations of Europe 
antl the Atlantic American cities, we are at a di.-^ad vantage by reason of 
having to round a great Continent. Our surplus wheat must cross the 
tropics twice and traverse forward and back 45 degrees of longitude to 
put it abreast of the Carribean Sea. Freight rates are high and must con- 
tinue so while a year's time is consumed in making the round trip by 
sailors. While the u:iion of the oceans will sharpen competition for the 
A'iiatic trade, it will so greatly increase our advantages in conducting 
European commerce as to quickly double our export trade. 

BONDS WANTED FOR THE STATE SCHOOL fUND. 

Ofliceof' (be State Boar<l of Exniniuers, Sacraiuciito, Au^ast 
5th, lS7a. — The State lioard of Examiniirs will receive sealed proposals fur the 
sale to the State, of Bonds of the United States, the Civil Bonds of this State, and 
the Bonds of the several counties of the State, to the value of Seventy Thousand 
Dollars, in gold coin, U. S., at its office at the State Capitol, until 1 o'clock p.m. of 
Saturday, September 7th, 1878. 

Proposals \vill be received for the whole or any part of said sum. 

Bids must be for Bonds and aceracd interest thereon. 

Each bid must be accompanied by the Bonds offered to be sold, or by one of the 
Bonds offered, as a sample, and a certified check drawn on some bank of good stand- 
ing, drawn to the order of the Clerk of the Board of Examiners for a sum equal to 
10 per cent, of the amount bid, which check will be forfeited to the State, if the bid 
which such check accompanies shall be accepted, and the party offering the Bonds 
fails to deliver the same. 

Payment will be made in the gold coin of the United States, 

The Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. 

Bids must state the Acts of the Legislature which authorized the issuing of the 
offered Bonds. 

Bids must be indorsed " Proposals for Sale of Bonds," and be addressed to the 
Clerk of the Board of Examiners. 

Bids vfiW be opened in open session of the Board at 1 o'clock p.m. September 7th, 
1S7S. E. W. MASLIN, 

Ang. 10. Clerk of the State Board of Examiners. 

THE MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LONDON, ENGLAND. 

[JSSTABLISHEJ) 1836.] 

Whole Amount of Jomt Stock aud Guarautee<i Capital- $5,000,000. 

Wliole Amoant of Capital paid up 900,000. 

Cash Assets December 31, 1876 r-... 3,710,000. 

The undersiffned have been duly authorized to issue Policies at ourrent rates on 
Freight and Shipments to or from England, Europe, New York, Japan, China, Aus- 
tralian Colonies, Sandwich Islands, and Northern Coast Porta. II desired, policies 
made payable at port of termiaation. 

WILUAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents, 

Aug. 10. ^ __^ 218 Calif ornia street. 

ENGLISH BICYCLES ANDnrRICYCLES. 

JOHN T. TIMMS & GO. 

(Who had Charg:e of the Bicycle Exhibit at the Centennial), 

Manufacture and Import the Best Machines only. Price Lists with the Editor, to 
save time. Address P. O, Box 504, Baltimore, Md., or 68 Spon street, Coventry, En- 
gland. An Agent wanted in San Francisco. Aug. 10. 

U. S. MAIL LINE. 

For Portland aud Astoria, Oregon, 

Cabin Passage, S15 ai>d SIO; Steerage, 85 ; Freiirbt, 92 and 
.?3 per Ton. —The Oregon SS. Company will dispatch the new and splendid Al 
Iron Steamship GEORGE VV. ELDER, F. Bolles, Commander, from Folsom-street 
wharf, on SATORDAY, August 10th, at 10 o'clock a.m. Tickets sold at Company's 
office, 210 Battery street ; also at 214 Montgomery street 
Aug. 10. K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent. 

M. A. Benrimo. * T, H. Sharwood. 

THE NOVELTY READING, CHESS AND CLUB-ROOMS. 

BENRIMO Oc SHAKWOOB, Proprietors. 

MONTEREY STREET. SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAIi. 

Aug. 10.] Finest brands Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

DAY SILVER MINING COMPANY. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meetiug of the Board of 
Trustees of the above-named Company, held on the sixth day of Aug:ust, a.d, 
1S78, the time for redeeming the stock bought in b^- the Company at delinquent sale, 
July 9th, 1878, was postponed to FRIDAY, August 16th, 1873. 

J. W. PEW, Secretary 
Office— Room 15, No. 310 Pine street, San Francisco, California. [Auff. 10. 



TEETH. 

After mature consideration, in consequence of the hard 
times, I have determined to reduce the price of gold fillings and artificial 
teeth almost one-half, giving- a fine set of teeth for §15, w^rth §25, and gold fillings 
for S3, worth S5, until further notice. T. C. JESSUP, 

[Aug. 10.] Comer of Sutter and Montgomery streets. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS Ll^TTER AND 



Aug 10, 1878. 



"The World," the Flesh, and the Devil. 

[By a Truthful Penman.] 

No more rides to Khiva, no more Cockle's pills for sick savages, no 
more carrying kicking; ponies under his arm, <ir flying up in balloons on the 
shortest possible notice. Captain Fred Burnaby is engaged to a lovely 
young lady of eighteen, a ward of the Irish Court of Chancery, and heir- 
ess, it is said, to £10,000 a year ; but the marriage will not take place im- 
mediately, as there are some legal matters to arrange. In the current 
number of the Russian journal, Dairla, an interesting account is given of 
the relative resources of the Russian and English empires. The author 
calculates that the "naval and mercantile resources of England are twice 
as great as those of all the world, and twenty times greater than those 
which Russia possesses." During the last 130 years, he adds, England 
has annexed 2,500,000 square miles of territory, with 250,000,000 people. 
The author concludes by asserting that the progi-ess of Eni:land in wealth 
and power ia relatively greater than that of any other nation, and quotes 
as an instance of her superiority over Russia the fact that during tlie last 
twenty years India has incresised the wealth of England by £240,000,000 
sterling, as compared with the de6cit of 22,000,000 roubles wliich has re- 
sulted to Russia between 1868 and 1877, by her annexations in Central 
Asia.— ^Sir Garnet Wulseley's house in Portman-square was literally be- 
sieged last week. People came in crowds — the curious, the ambitious, the 
avaricious and the needy. The first lot were anxious to go out to Cyprus 
just to see the place, and hoped he would not mind giving them a little 
information ; as if he had nothing better to do when just starting on an 
important special mission. The ambitious included adventurous men in 
many professions: soldiers, of com-se, eager for staff employment, and 
hundreds of the official class who thought themselves exactly suited to 
administer a slice of the new territory, or who wished to be head of 
police or commissioner of customs. The pushing British trader and the 
wily Greek, scenting "game" from afar, were also among the eager appli- 
cants for the new Governor's favor ; they were ready to make contracts, 
open stores, establish banks, or turn their hands to any commercial specu- 
lation. So gi-eat was the influx that Sir Garnet secured the services of a 
special Cerberus or hall-porter, who acted as filter or buffer, rigidly scru- 
tinizing all comers, and, unless fully satisfied, stoutly denying admission. 
No doubt there is a fine field for enterprise in the new possession. No 
towns, no ports, no hotels. Sir Garnet means to live in a tent for the 
present ; but it has been suggested that he should take up his residence 
in the old Governor's palace at Famagusta, where whole streets of houses 
have been standing empty for years.—— The preference shown by the Em- 
peror William for cornflowers is well-known. The consequence is, that 
in Germany the flower ia now being largely used in bouquets, and in the 
newly invented and most charming "flower cushions." The people of 
Berlin, in their demonstrations in honor of the Emperor's escape from the 
assassin, employ cornflowers broadcast. The late Queen Louise of Prus- 
sia had the same preference for cornflowers. It suited her very well to 
wear them, being fair, and the color of the flower corresponding ivith the 
blue of her eyes. Standing one day at a fete by the side of Frederick 
William III., and wearing a white cb-ess spotted with cornflowers, she was 
told that some French generals had dared to scoff at her simple dress, 
which they said was, being without diamonds, very mean. The Queen 
replied, " Since French horses have trampled down our fields, cornflowers 
belong to the jewels of Prussia."^^We trust that Sir Garnet Wolseley 
has been careful to take with him to his new seat of government none but 
gentlemen of approved morals and manners; for it would be a pity to 
give an opportunity to Mr. Baring, who now holds the reins of power ad 
interim, to say, looking round at Sir Garnet's staff, what Othello said to 
Lodovico, 

*' You are welcome, sir, to Cyprus.— Goats and monkeys!" 
-^We understand that, in consequence of the statement made in these 
columns last week, the authorities at Hurlingham have decided that no 
pigeon-shooting shall take place while polo is being carried on.— XoHt/iw 
World.' — Lockhart wrote Spanish ballads, Southey ponderous epics ; 
but it has been reserved for a Quarterhj Reviewer of our own day, a man 
whose mind is a vast storehouse of all kinds of lore — are we indiscreet in 
naming Mr. Hayward, Q.C.?— to indite pretty verses to women. Here 
are some of his lines: 

On a Photograph of a Ladt holding a Bouquet against her Modth. 

Most favored of flowers, don't you feel. 

When you hide so much loveliness thus. 

When all you caress you conceal, 

That you're sadly forgetful of us? 

You may hear the complaint with surprise, 
Entranced by the dew which you sip; 

But who could e'er gaze in those eyes. 

And not long for the heaven of her lip? 
After this it may be as well to say that Mr. Hay ward's initial letter does 
- not stand for Anacreon.— Assuredly, to support Government on condi- 
tion of receiving backstair information is remunerative. One of the pro- 
prietors of an ardent pro-Turkish and pro-Ministerial journal has made 
between £200,000 and £300,000 by bulling "Turks." Would that we 
were of Lord Beaconsfield's race, then, perhaps, we should obtain an 
inkling of his policy before it is known to the public— H.R.H. the 
Prince of Wales has -christened his new steam-launch Natika, after an 

American young lady. "In the last century," says "Old and New 

London "for July, "there were several organized Lying Clubs one of 
which for many years held its meetings at the ' Bell Tavern.' w'estmin- 
T^^" /S"J ^® ^^^^ "° occasion tu go back to the last century to find 
Lymg Clubs. When I was at Bishop Auckland, in the county of Dur- 
ham, a few years ago, I found there a Lying Club existing and flourish- 
ing. It had a first eleven, and a second twenty-two, just like a cricket 
club. If a man, who was a member of the first eleven, didn't acquit him- 
self well as a liar, he was put back into the second twenty-two; and if a 
man did well in the second twenty-two he was promoted to the first 
elev.ei;i. If a man couldn't tell lies at all, he was expelled from the club 
I aev^r :^e,\y any one expeUed. I was black-balled.— rr«(/i/ui Tommy, 

A lady said ihat jthis was the finest compliment she had ever received- 
She was recently on hprsehack, and as she rode past an Irishman who 
was standing by the roadside, she heard him say, " I wisht I was in prison 
for the staling ov ye." 




ENGLISH BICYCLES. 

G. L. CUKNXNC3HAM, 
S06 Sansome street, Saji Francisco, 

Is now prepared to fill orders for Duplex Ex- 
ceisicr, Stanley, Club, Gentleman's, Challenge, 
Prtinier, upd all other makes of English Bicycles. 

Price, from giGO to 91^0, 
according to quality of material and size of, 
machine. G. L. CUNNINGHAM. 

Importer of English LicyclKS, 
206 Sansome St., otfice of Macondray & Co. 
June 22, San Francisco, California. 



TO LET. 

QUEEN'S THEATER, DTJNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND. 

Tbis eleg^aut niid cummotlious Theater, sitnateil in the 
main thoroughfare in tlie heart of the lartreat city in New Zealand, can be ob- 
tained for long or short dates on very moderate terms. From its central position, it 
always commands large and fashionable audiences to legitimate pntertainmcnts and 
first-class talent. The interior has recently been sumptuously furnished, Dress Circle 
and Stalls havinpr partitioned seats in Utrecht Velvet and Leather, and other apiwint- 
meuts of the most appruved kind. The stage is well furnished with Scenic Proper- 
ties, and the necessary requirements for Opera, Concert or Drama. 

The building has been pronounced the best ventilated and most comfortableTheater 
in the Australasias. Seating accommodation, 1,500. All rates, water and gas are \ 
included in the hiring. 

Population of Dunedin and suburbs, about 26,000. 

Correspondence and communications invited from friends, responsible managers, 
etc. For terms and dates apply to GEORGE R. WEST, 

Theatrical and Concert Agent, Music Wareliouse, Dunedin, N. Z., Sole Agent, 

Where all professional corresjwndence can be addressed, and advice or information 
obtained. July 20. 



SODA! SODA I 

SCHWEPPE'S SODA WATEB! 

With HENNESSY BRANDY, forms a perfect combination. 
SCHWSPPES TONIC WAT^E! 

The most pure and perfect appetizer known. , i 

SCHWEPPE'S POTASS WATEt ! i 

A sure cure for dyspepsia. 
SCHWBPPE'S MAlVEEN S?:LTZEE! 
Bottled at the celebrated Malvern Springs, Worcestershire ; highly recommended 
by all Physicians. I. SCHWEPPE & CO., 

Bcrners auti Oxford streets, I^udoii. 
Regular Consignments received by BENJ. F. RILEY, 

July 13. 318 Front st., u^ stairs. 



i 



B 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 



elmont Slliiiiij? Company. IjUCHtioii of Prlnclp il Place 

of Business, San Francisco, California, Location of Works, ' niladelphia 

Mining District, Belmont, Nye county, Nevada. "Notice is hereby given, that at a 
meeting"Of-the Board of Directors, held on the 29th day of July, 187S, an assessment, 
No, 18, of 40 cents per share, was levied upon the capital stock of the Corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, Room 16, No. 310 Pine street, San Francisco, California. Any stock upon 
which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the '2d day of September, 1S78, will be 
delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment is made 
before will be sold on TUESDAY, the 24th day of September, 1878, to pay the delin- 
quent assessment, together with costs of advertising and exnenses of sale. By order 
of the Board of Directors. J."W. PEW, Secretary. 

Aug. 3. OtBce : Room 15, No. 3 10 P ine s treet, Sau Francisco, Cal. 

VALLEJO WHITE~s'ULPHUirSPRINGS 

"l^ovrOpeu lor the Reception of Ouests. El. Connolly, Jtlao- 

Xl ager. These Springs are situated three miles from Vallejo. The watercannot 
be excelled in medicinal qualities. The climate is delightful, and those visiting the 
resort will find everything that is conducive to pleasure and comfort. 

These Springs have been fitted up at immense expense and with rare taste and 
judgment, and they stand confessedly as the most beautiful and charming place of 
resort to be found in the State of California. 

A Stage for passengers and baggage M-ill connect with the morning and evening 
trains and boats from San Francisco at the North Vallejo Depot. Aug. 3. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE. 

NEVILLE & CO., 
113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 

San Fra-vcisco. [May 24. 



HP 



S' 



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

old by all Stationers. Sole As:eut for the United States: 

MR. HENKY HOE, 91 John street, N Y. Jan. 6. 



HEBIO COMPANY'S EXTHACT OF MEAT. 



F 



Inestaiid Cheapest Meat -flavoring: Stoek for Sonps, Made 

Dishes and Sauces. March 2. 



LIEBIG COMPAITT'S EXTKACT OF MEAT 

[s a success and boon for which Nations should feel svHte* 
f al. See " Medical Press," " Lancet," " Uritish Medical Journal," etc. 



LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MEAT- 

Caution— Oennine only with fac-simile of Baron I^lebig^^s 
Signature, in blue ink, across Label. "Consumption in England increased ten- 
fold in ten years." March 2. 

LIEBIG COMPANY'S EXTRACT OF MFAT. 

To be had of all Store-keepers, Grocers and Chemists. Sole 
Agents for the United States (wholesale only), C. David Ac Co., 43, Mark Lane, 
London, England. March 2. 

Permanent salesmen wanted to sell 

No {Middling. Expenses paid. Address 
S. A. GRANT & CO., 2, 4, and 8 Home St., Cincinnati, O, 



v© J_^l^ vf Staple Goods to dealers. 



Sept. 1,] 



Ooia Plated Watches. Cheapest In the known world. 

Sample Wulc/t Free to Agents. Address A. COULTER & CO., Chicago. 



S3 

SL.it Kf\i\ » Year. Agents wanted 

^^tj\t\t Partieulara tree. 



Business legrltimate. 

J. WORTH & CO., St. Louis, Mo. 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



THB COLONIZATION OF CTPRUa 

Tliere's a flutUr fr»iin Drkney clear down to Penzance, 

And ii Mtir nn the hanKH of the Shnnnnn, 
Since Piuy outwitted both Uu^^iii and Frauc« — 

Tht» diplomat trrtui the uannon. 
A tremor of hopefulntwu) riiud through the laud, 

8u(t)ieu»o makes e'en Imin^litv cheeku ashy — 
"How nice it will Iks for ilear HiUlehrand 

If Sir Garnet ApiH>ints him atUtche." 

For Cypr\i3 ia wealthy and Cynnw la new, 
Ajid youn;,'Lr sons muat oe provided ; 
Aak a member. "Who helped to briny Beaconsfield through?" 
He'll au!4wer wtmphicently, '*! ditl." 
"And Sir Garnet hiLs promised"- ho'U add with a hiugh— 
"At least I may call it a jirt^miHe — 
That the tirMt vnaiut place which he has on hiij Btafif 
Will be given my seventh son, Thomas," 

Ask Ljuly Godiva, "la Alfred at home?" 
She'll tell you in accenta of sorrow, 
"Ah, yes; poor, dear fellow, he's only just come, 
And he's leaving for Cyprus to-morrow." 
Aak Kcipuald Diwh, of the penniless foot— 
"I'm just home from Canada, darn it; 
And now comes the order for sadtlle and boot, 
I've yot to be off with Sir Garnet.'" 

The peoplin{j of Cyprus is settled, at least 

'Twill be colonized, cellar aud attic, 
From the sea on the west to the sea on the east, 

By the beautiful corps diplomatic. 
And if they should pack them us tight aa sardines 

Or closely as eg^'s in a basket, 
No doubt therell be some cousin's friend of the Queen's 

To scent a position and aak it. 

No doubt poor Sir Garnet went gladly away 

With temper more equally easy, 
When he left Cnaring Cross that fine midsummer day 

For his government, via Brindisi. 
And though all the papers unite to commend 

The successful astuteness of Dizzy, 
I think the new Island will certainly tend 

To keep its new governor busy. G. H. J. 

ADVENTURE OF AN ENGUSHMAN IN THIBET. 
The murder of Mr. T. T. Cooper at Bhamo is one of those tragic ac- 
cessories to political life in the East, which occur from time to time, and 
prove the active barbarism amid which British officials have still to per- 
form their duties. Mr. Cooper was at one time agent for the Chamber of 
Commerce at Calcutta, and in 1868 he resolved to travel through China 
to India, by a route comparatively unknown and full of dangers. Start- 
ing from Hadow, he traveled along the Yan-tac-kaing and went down to 
Eastern Thibet and Yunnan, meeting with many adventures on the way. 
He started on this long journey of several thousand miles with only £200 
in his pocket, and aa he might have been robbed at any point of the route 
he took, his position was a decidedly precarious one. He was imprisoned 
at least once, and on another occasion in Thibet, had a more agreeable 
surprise, by being married unawares. One day he found himself in a 
grove, surrounded by a group of girls, and, according to him, "the whole 
scene was so Arciadian, and the romantic effect so irresistible, that though 
struck by the remarkable absence of the male sex, he gave himself up to 
the influence of the situation, and waited with curiosity the denouement of 
this pleasant little adventure." He smoked with the girls and shared their 
meals, and afterwards they dragged in a young girl of sixteen, attired in 
a silk dress, seated her by his side, and then commenced dancing around 
the pair. He could not make it out until his servant explained that ac- 
cording to one of the customs of Thibet, he had, without knowing it, al- 
lowed himself to be married. He at first wished to resist, pleading Eng- 
lish customs, but the tribe among whom he was would accept no expla- 
nations, and he was compelled to take the girl with him. He intended 
to take her to Calcutta and hand her over there to the Catholic Sisters, 
but, fortunately for Mm, Lo-tzung, his bride, had an uncle in some dis- 
tant part of the country who took her off his hands, much to his relief. 

A speciM correspondent at Pekin. China, sends us some additional 
facts respecting the famine in China. He writes: 

"The Marquis of Tseng, who will replace his Kinsman Kuo in England 
and France, was in to see me last evening ; had just received a letter from 
his uncle, Governor of Shansi. They had had no rain, and the outlook 
was dreadful. Six millions are estimated already starved and frozen to 
death, for they have in most cases nothing to sell but the roof timbers of 
their poor shanties ; and the whole roof often only buys them food for a 
week, and then cold and starvation take the whole family. Whole vil- 
lages depopulated, dogs and fowls and every living thing but crows and 
carrion birds dead. The London estimate that 70,000,000 were perished 
is no exaggeration, but those actually waiting for death by starvation, 
more or less prompt, are still 10,000,000 perhaps, of whom relief will be 
too tardy to save perhaps 2,000,000, while, if the rains are denied in 
Shansi, Honan and Shensi again this Spring, nothing but foreign or 
Divine interposition will save 10,000,000 from death. They have died like 
sheep, dumb and not opening their mouths. The few risings, where one 
or two thousand have banded together, have been put down with a strong 
hand, and the dead will be looked after by parties 'going through the 
land,' etc., as see Ezekiel xxxix." 



Nothing is more injurious than the absurd belief some people place in 
the statements of newspapers. Not long ago the Post published an elabo- 
rately written article, designed to show that out of one hundred rag- 
pickers dying in this city ninety-nine had accumulated and secreted large 
fortunes. Since then it has been painful to watch the astonishment of 
the scrap-scrapers to behold well-dressed gentlemen taking off silk hats to 
them, and young ladies fluttering handkerchiefs in their direction while 
turning the comers. 



INSURANCE. 



FIBE, LIFE AND MARINE. 

INSURANCE AGENCY~HUTCHINSON & MANN, 

^o. 314 Califoruia Street, Sau Francisco. 
Capital Represented $11 .860,000. 



Otnipd I118.C0 Philttdolphiii, rii-ir^ 

Ki3verf Fire Ins. Co Iluat'iii. "" 

Nl'W Orleans Ins. Aos'n New Orluiuis 

Union Ins. Co Galveston, Tcxus 

Tnulo Ills. Co Canidon, N. J, 



le'M Ins. Co Nuwarlt, N. J. 

aul F. &M. Ins. Co... St. Paul, Minn. 

Uimiu liis. Co Culunibux, Oliio 

La Cttisso Ounorale Ins. Co. .Paris, France. 



AGGREGATE ASSETS, 838,789.0651 

Imperial Fire Insurance Company Of London. 

Loudon Assurance Corporation Of London. 

Northern Assurance Company Of London. 

Queen Insurance Company Of Liverpool. 

^1 Joint l*oHcy lasnvd by the Four Companies. 

W. I^ ANE BOOK ER Affcu t and Attorney. 

KOBEKT DICKSON Maiiiiger. 

July 1.*!, 317 California St., San Francisco. 



HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE CO. OF CALIFORNIA, 

Principal Ollice, -iOt* Cnlil'urula Street, San Francisco. 
Caah Asaota, January 1, 1877, $59r),291 ; Liabilities, §5,fS2 ; Surplus fur Policy 
Holdurs, $58U,339. J. F. Houghton, President; Geo. H. Howard, Vice-President; 
Charles 11. Story, Secretary. R. H. MAGILL, H. H. BIGELOW, General Ag-enta. 

Directors. — San Franciaco — Geo. H. Howard, John H. Redington, J. F. Houghton 
R. B. Gray, Robert Watt, John Curroy, L. L. Baker, W. F. Whittier, C. C. Burr, E. 
M. Root, W. H. White, J. L, N. Shepard, W. M. Greenwood. George S. Mann. CjTua 
Wilson, W. T. Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Ilotating, A. Block. A. K, P. Harmon, 
G. S. Johnson, W. O. Wilson, A. W. Bowman, H. L. Dodge, Charles R. Story. Ala- 
meda County Branch~V. D. Moody, Chauncy Taylor, A. C. Henry, Robert S. Far- 
relly, Joseph B. Marlin, W. B. Hardy, T. B. Simpson. San Diego— A. H. Wilcox. 
Sacramento— Mark Hopkins, D. W. Earl, Julius Wetzlar, James Carolau. San Jose — 
T. Ellard Beans, B. D. Murphy, A. Pfister, J. H. Dibble, J. S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, John Auzeraia, John Balbach. Stockton — H. H. Hewlett, Chas. Belding, 
J. D. Peters, A. W. Simpson, H. M. Fanning. Marysville— D. E, Knight. Grass 
Valley— Wm. Watt, T. W. Sigoumey. Portland, Oregnn— W. S. Ladd, C. H. Lewis, 
P. Wasserman, B. Goldsmith, D. Macleay. Virginia City, Nevada — John Gillig, Isaac 
L. Reqiia^ M arch 17. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.--UNION INS. GO. OF S. F. 

Tbe Califoruia I^loytls. — Established lu 1861.— Hfos. 416 and 
418 Califoniia street. Cash capital §750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed S1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Frascisco — J. Mora Moss, N. G. Kittle, M. J. O'Connor, R. S. Floyd, Moses 
Heller, Adam Grant, Daniel Meyer, Antoine Borel, Charles Kohler, Joseph Seller, 
I. Lawrence Pool, A. Weill, Joseph Brandenstoin, Charles Baum, James Moffitt, Ed- 
ward Cadwalader, Benjamin Brewster, L. Cunningham, W. M. Hoag, Nicholas Lu- 
ning, John Parrott, L. A. Booth, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, Bartlett Doe, Gustave 
Touchard, J. H. Baird, J. G. Kittle, George C. Hickox, C. Ducommun, Wm. Scholle, 
John Conly, I. Steinhart, N. B. Stone, J. O. Eldridge, A. B. Phipps, Jas. M. Goewey. 
GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 
Charles D. Haven. Secretary. Geo. T. Bohbn, Surveyor. July 28. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE WSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF UAaiBUKG. 

Capital $1,125,000. IT. S. Gold Coin. 

Losses I*ald in Gold Coin Immediately Alter Adjustment. 
This Corponi-tion holds contracts of twelve other European Insurance Compa- 
nies, re-insuring by far the greater part of every risk, as soon as accepted in our of- 
fice. The combined subscribed Capital which our policies therefore offer to the public, 
A.'tnountB to ti Of which 

$11 ,662.500. TT. S. Gold Coin, | $3,241,250 is Paid XJp« 
JBesides the Always Available Reserve Funds. 



Aug. 3. 



GEORGE MARCUS & CO., General Agents for the Pacific Coast, 

304 California street. 



THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 

FIK£ AND 9IABINE. 

C^lasli Asnets, 8450,000.— -Principal Office, 218 and 220 San- 
J some street, San Francisco. Officers :— A. J. Bryant, President ; Richard 
IVKRS, Vice-President ; Charles H. CusniNO, Secretary ; H. H. Watson, Marine 
Surveyor. Board of Directors :— Peter Donahue, James Irvine, C. D. O'Sullivan, 
A. Bocqueraz, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George O. 
McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, H. H. Watson, Dr. C. F. Buckley, 
P. J. White, E. M. Root, M. Mayblum, Richard Ivers, John Rosenfeld, Daniel 
Callaghan, P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. DowTiey, Los Angeles. Wm. 
Hood, Sonoma County. H. W. Scale. Mayfield. Geo. Rutherford, San Jose. Feb. 16. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFEkINSUR. CO. OF BOSTON. 

Ha!* trausaetcil llie buHiiiess of I^ii'e lu^nrance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policj'-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has comr-t'ed with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
Sept. 2'i.] 328 Montgomery street. 

THE SWISS MARINE INS. COMPANIES COMBINED. 

Switzerland, ol'ZiirJcIt, Capital 5,000,000 francs; Helvetia, 
of St. Gall, CainUl 10,0UU,000 francs ; Baloise, of Basle, Capital 5,000,000 francs. 
These three Companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that may be sus- 
tained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the world. In the set- 
tlement of all claims under an English policy, our Companies will strictly adhere to 
the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds, and submit to English jurisdiction. 
June 9. HENRY BALZER & CO., Agents, 213 Sansome st., S. F. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Balfonr, eatbrle & Co., 'So. 

No. 18. 



C Capital 85,000,000.— Acei'ts ; 
J 230 California street, San Francisco. 



THE THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INS. CO., LIMITED. 



June. 1. i 



£. N. HOOPSK, Agrent. 

Off.ce : 302 California Street. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug 10, 1878. 



THE LESSON OF THE BERTJN CONGRESS. 

One of the most important and interesting features of the recent 
European ConLTess is its si^jniticance with regard to the power which 
Buch a Efathering of tirst-class political intellect may exerdse for the 
peaceable adjustment of international disputes. For many years the 
minds of humane and thoughtful statesmen have grappled with the prob- 
lem of how to avoid war between civilized powers. Kot only has the ad- 
vance of public morality and rational culture stripptd war of its mere- 
tricious glories, and clothed it with hoiror as an execrable crime against 
ourselves and against nature, but other and more practical considerations 
have led men to regard it as an intoleiable evil. War, at all times hide- 
ous and wasteful enough, has of late years assumed an aspect a hundred 
times moie frightful and costly than of old. The mighty engines and 
vast armies which it demands render the modem trial by battle more or 
less ruinous to the richest nations that indulge in it, draining as it does in 
a few days or weeks the national accumulations of years of peace and 
prosperity. It is no wonder, then, that philanthropists and politi- 
cal economists have written and thought so much about the possibility of 
settling international differences without a resort to arms. 

Two oppositely extreme and erjually impracticable tbeories have been 
put forward as a means of attaining this desirable end. The first, es- 
poused chiefly by militai-y men, is that a nation ran only avert war by 
being constantly prepared to engage in it, which means that Europe shall 
continue to be what she has been since the Austro- Prussian war— one vast 
military encampment. But it is evident that peace, bought at this price, 
would be more disastrous financially than war itself. We know what it 
has cost the gi-eat Continental Powers to maintain an armed equality, 
and we have seen how incessant have been their endeavors to turn the 
balance of power in their own favor by adding to their fleets and armies. 
Not content with being as strong as the rest, each has striven constantly 
to be the strongest^ and the burdens of taxation and enforced military 
service imposed upon the people have consequently been almost more than 
they could bear. The second theory, held by a comparatively few enthu- 
siasts; is that a total and simultaneous suppression of all armed forces 
would of necessity secure permanent peace to the civilized world. But 
the idea that great Powers would thus consent to place themselves upon 
an equality with petty States, is too absurdly Utopian for serious consid- 
eration. More or less connected with both these extreme theories, is the 
belief that when actual war is thus put out of the question, by mutual 
strength or mutual weakness, the nations will adjust their disputes — for 
even the most sanguine do not have faith in a millenium, when there will 
be no disputes to adjust— by arbitration. Now, it is in this particular 
that the hopes of the theorists seem likely to be fulfilled, for by the 
Treaty of Berlin the most complex and troublesome problem of the cen- 
tury has been amicably solved. But this solution was not aided by the 
weakness or strength of those concerned in the quarrel. It was the re- 
sult of that advanced stage of civilization which has at length brought 
the world to regard war as an evil which it is worth while making almost 
any sacrifices to avoid. In short, it is putting the cart before the horse 
to suppose that either readiness to make war or inability to fight efl^ect- 
ively will ever prevent nations from coming to blows. Their own sense 
of what is right — or rather, perhaps, of what is advantaireous — must 
gradually teach them the lolly and wickedness of war, and when that is 
accomplished, then the peace millenium will naturally follow. 

Although this may possibly be the slow work of centuries, yet the 
Treaty of Berlin has taught the world an invaluable lesson. When the 
Congress met the political outlook could not have been darker; now that 
its labors are concluded the aspect of affairs could scarcely be more satis- 
factory in the present or more full of hope for the future. Doubtless 
this happy result is greatly owing to the fact that the grave and threat- 
ening questions which the Congress had to consider were dealt with not 
only by the very best quality of statesmen which Europe could produce, 
but also by the heads of the respective Governments. The peace of the 
continent was not entrusted to subordinate and partially irresponsible 
diplomats, as had generally been the case before, but to Prime Ministers 
and Chancellors, whose powers were unquestionable and whose word was 
irrevokable. Their labors were delicate and arduous in the extreme, and 
that they have succeeded in bringing them to a peaceful close is the 
strongest argument that the war mania is being gradually crushed out by 
wiser counsels and more enlightened views. 



GLAUS SPRECKLES AND SUGAR CANE. 

A few weeka since, the Bulletin, in a leading article entitled 
" Sugar Cane in California," takes exception to a resident of this city, 
meaning our esteemed townsman, Claus Spreukles, having purchased a 
large estate in the Hawaiian Islands for the purpose of raising sugar cane. 
It claims that this action on the part of our capitalists is due to the ex- 
isting treaty, and that the money so invested in the Sandwich Islands 
could have been used to more advantage by developing those portions of 
our State known to be capable of producing the cane from whence sugar 
is extracted; or, in plainer language, the BuUttin thinks that the money 
had better have been kept at home instead of being sent abroad to benefit 
the Kanakas. With the full knowledge of the fact that every man has 
the privilege of doing as he pleases witn his own, it appears to be gross 
impudeftce on the part of the Bulletin to cast any reflection upon Mr. 
Spreckles for investing his money where and in any way he may see fit. 
While it almost says that a positive injury is being done this State by the 
foreign investment, it fails on the other hand to show wherein this coun- 
try is benefited by the aforesaid transaction. In the first place, Mr. 
Spreckles, in order to forward his enterprise, has ordered some 2,000 tons 
of iron from Pittsburg, and to complete it will purchase about 81,000,000 
worth of machinery in California. This cannot be injurious to the coun- 
try or State, even if tl)e articles named do not go to Kern county, and it 
would have been as veil for the Bulletin to have mentioned the circum- 
stance in connection with the purchase of the plantation. It is evident 
that the Bulletins greatest happiijess consists in making itself perfectly 
miserable ^bout something. It don't like the existing treaty, because Ha- 
waiian sugar is adjnitted free of dutyj it goes after the sugar refiners in 
general, and Claus Spreckles in particular, and devotes three-quarters of 
a column to a good old-fashioned BuUttin growl, that serves no purpose 
whatever produces not the slightest effect, and that is scarcely noticed 
even by those at whom the shot is directed. It will not change the action 
of Mr. Spreckles; it will not deter others from doing as Mr. Spreckles 
has done, if they see fit to do so; and the entire article may be considered 
as so much time lost and comjiosition wasted. 



GENERAL FREMONT. 

The advent of General J. C. Fremont, en route to assume the duties 
of Governor of the Territory of Arizona, is an event deserving of more 
than a mere passing notice. No one is more closely identified with the 
early history of California. He is the pioneer of pioneers, and his recog- 
nition as such in New York by those of our early settlers, who have re- 
turned to the East, will doubtless be renewed here, and in a manner 
worthy of the men who have done so much to complete the structure of 
which General Fremont laid the foundation. The Great Pathfinder, as 
Ereemont has been most appropriately termed, has had a life full of stir- 
ring scenes and incidents. He, of all others, can note the wonderful 
changes that have taken place in our country since he made his first ex- 
plorations in the far West and across the continent. As he rushes over 
the mountains and plains in the express train, surrounded by all the 
comforts and conveniences of drawing-room and sleeping-cars, he may 
well compare the present with the past, or the days of 78 with those of '46, 
when, after a hard day's march, and with saddle for a pillow, he wrapped 
himself in the army blanket, and rested his weary body after the fatigues 
of the day. In all his journeys of exploration he was most persistent; he 
shrank at no difficulties or dangers; he surmounted every obstacle, and 
endured all the privations and hardships equally as well as the most 
hardened frontiersman; he has known the pangs of starvation, the perils 
of the snow drift, and the numerous evils and vicissitudes which beset the 
paths of those who wander through the ivildemess of our Western terri- 
tories, and yet, with all that he has undergone, he returns to the shores 
of the Pacific, at the age of sixty-five, in the enjoyment of excellent health, 
and with the prospect before him of many years of usefulness. In political 
and military life General Fremont has borne a prominent part, and his 
name is as well known throughout the land as that of any public man of 
the present day. From the Afnerican Entycloptdicey^Q learn that John 
Charles Fremont is a native of Georgia, having been born in Savannah in 
1813. At the age of fifteen he entered the jimior class of Charleston Col- 
lege. He afterwards became teacher of mathematics on board the U. S. 
sloop of war Natchez, and made a two years' cruise in her. On her re- 
turn, and after a severe examination, he was appointed Professor of 
Mathematics in the Navy, but having no fondness for sea service he re- 
signed, and entered upon the life of a civil engineer. In 18.^8 he received 
hLs commission as Lieutenant in the Topog-raphical Engineers. In 1841 
he secretly married the daughter of Col. T. H. Benton, at that time U. S. 
Senator from Missouri. In 1842 his first exploration of the far West was 
commenced, and these were continuous almost until when in Oregon, in 
184C, he met a party in search of him, with orders from the War Depart- 
ment directing him to watch over the interests of the United States in 
California. He at once retraced his steps to California, the settlers rose 
and joined him, and in less than a month all of Northern California was 
freed from Mexican rule. His military operations on this coast at and 
after that time, and until the Mexican war was ended and California be- 
came part of the United States, are too well known to require repetition 
here. In 1S48 he resigned his commission, and in 1849 determined to settle 
in California, and the same year was elected United States Senator to 
represent the new State in Congress. In 18.56 he was nominated for Pres- 
ident of the United States but was defeated by Mr. Buchanan. Soon after 
the breaking out of the rebellion he was made a Major General in the 
army, and assigned to the command of the Western District. In 1862, by 
reason of being ordered to serve under an o6Scer his junior in rank, he 
tendered his resignation, which was promptly accepted. Since that period 
he has been engaged in various pursuits. At one time General Fremont 
was considered to be one of the very wealthy men of the country, but his 
riches took wings, until, very lately, he was reduced to a condition of ab- 
solute poverty. President Hayes learning his condition, and taking into 
consideration his long and valuable services to the country, appointed him 
Governor of Arizona. It would require many volumes to record all the 
interesting matter connected with the life of J. C. Fremont, and although 
much of it bas appeared in print, a vast portion remains untold- The 
News Letter' extends a hearty welcome to the General, and it hopes that 
the years remaining to him may be full of happiness and prosperity, of 
which he is so well deserving, and to show its regards it will, at an early 
day, present its readers with a portrait of the General, engraved from the 
latest photograph. 

ENGLAND'S NAVY. 
Formidable as is the superb iron-clad fleet of Great Britain, it is 
scarcely less so than her squadron of cruisers. While every attention has 
been paid to the construction of armored vessels, in order to enable them 
to resist the shock of the heaviest projectiles, the ability to injure an en- 
ray's commerce has not been lost sight of. The new steel dispatch vessel, 
the Iris, one of the latest additions to the English fleet, is of 4,000 tons 
and 7,000-horse power. On a recent trial trip she developed a speed of 
twenty-ope miles an hour. She is lightly armed with sixty-four pounders, 
and, having a speed superior to anything afloat that we know of, she will 
be able to keep out ot the way of a vessel of heavier armament, take her 
own position in an action with a ship of equal force, and make short work 
of an inferior. One vessel of her class could work untold mischief with 
an enemy's mercantile marine, and the chances of her being captured or 
destroyed would be very remote. It w<ndd be well for the Na\'y Depart- 
ment of the United States to look into this matter, and when our squad- 
rons are reconstructed, if ever that time arrives, care should be taken to 
produce something as near the Iris as possible, and let us have no more 
Trentons, Tennessees, Pcnsacolas, and ships of like character, fitted for no 
other purpose than to bear the name of men-of-war. 



Secretary Sherman has now 8197,000,000 of coin in the Treasury. If 
we deduct the 830,000,000 of interest due, we have left §167,000,000 ap- 
plicable to the redemption of $46,000,000 of coin certificates and S346,- 
000,000 of greenbacks. If we regard these two forms of paper as one, we 
can say that the Treasury has §167,000,000 of gold wherewith to redeem 
§393,000,000 of paper. This is about 42 per cent, of reserve against the 
liability. With the greenback within h of 1 per cent, of par, and the 
Secretary still accumulating gold, and the" course of trade strongly in our 
favor, _we may regard the gold premium as a very fleeting thing and 
quite likely to disappear within the Autumn. It certainly should disap- 
pear snnie weeks before the date set by the law for resumption. "The spe- 
cie movement for the past fiscal year will show a very insignificant uet 
export-less than -S2,0UO,00O, against a production for the year of §45,- 
000,000 in gold alone, and as much more in silver. 



Ang. 10, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISEU. 



11 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

"Hmf tb* Critr!" "What tha deTll «rt tbonr 
'*Oae tbkt will plkj tb» «li>vll, sir. witb yon." 

" Uif'ii a sttnjE Id hi* ull «« looe u > tliiil. 
Which mad* him cruw bolder and bolder." 



Tho French press reporters ar« an onmivcrous class, who will take 
almost niiytliiuK thai in Kivcn to thcni, even if tliev do not hurst their 
ct>at-i*leevfM reachin^^ fnr things, as is the caso with their fraternity in 

this hut iiovfr ininil ahotit that now. Puria corrt?sinini.!tnt8 say that 

wb«n«vtr the liraiid Jurytitarta to iusjwct any Kxwn dciiartment the 
VrtiM Gang, to the nuiuU-r of a couple of hundred, proiniitly join in and 
tuiniple everything with theiui>htapiialliiig thoroughness. For illustration, 
wht-n the t'aliforiiia wine exhibit wa^i riiuhed the Jurj' found the rep<)rt- 
er» had got a little altead of them, and every ilrop of our na'ive (alleged) 
chnmp{igne had been ([uietly put away. They testified as to its merits, 
however. They even got away with a whole hogshead of Nantucket cod- 
fish, and the L'omnn»!*ion found them blandly picking their teeth with 
the bonts, and waiting for the canned Saddle Rock oysters to be opened. 
This so exasperated Governor McL'ormick, our t'ommissioner-in-Chief, 
that he called a cv>unoiI of war, in which a most horrible job was put up 
on tho unausiH'cting scribes. A grona of Seidlitz jiowders was quietly pro- 
cured friim the l>rug Department, and about fifty pitchers were filled 
with water in which the white papers had been mixed. The attendants 
then supplied the cohort with ghus.sea and filled the same^ the Governor 
announcing that he desired their best attention to a celebrated American 
mineral water. He i)roposed a toast, as is the custom, and the glasses 
were solemnly drained. He then asked them to sample another and 
etjually famous American spa; and the glasses were refilled with the blue 
papers, mingled this time with the beverage. When all was ready, Mc- 
Cormick gave "The French Press." The array of reporters solemnly 
biJwed and emjitied their goblels. As they did so, two hundred smoth- 
ered shrieks were heard, and two hundred human fountains began to gush 
over the sy)ectatoi-s. When the last reporter ceased bubbling over, the 
entire Commission was \>eing escorted out of the building in the midst of 
a hollow square formed by the marines. Not a solitary prize will be 
awarded to this country if the French newspaper men can help it. 

Iiast week we told how an old reprobate bamboozled a guileless young 
lady artist. The latter has turned out to be not so guileless as one waiild 
suppose. This is the way she got even. She painted a flower piece, 
aniong the leaves of which was a spray of wheat. Before she painted 
this spray in, however, she wouhl every morning wafer a real spray to 
the canvass, and then turn loose in the studio her canary. Of course the 
bird soon got in the habit of resorting to the picture for its breakfast. 
When all was ready, she painted in the wheat stalk and sent for the fest- 
ive old capitalist alluded to. She had been commissioned to sell, she said, 
a famttus painting by one of the old French masters, the most realistic 
Ilower piece in the world. It could be had for a mere song — only S4,000. 
While the expert stood gravely considering the alleged gem, the young 
lady quietly raised the door of the bird-cage, when instantly its occupant 
flew to and began pecking at the painted wheat. No connoisseur that 
ever lived could/ have resisted that, and a check was instantly handed 
over for the amount. The owner of the celebrated French masterpiece 
will i)robably not know until he reads this why the blamed picture won't 
work with his own canary. 

Now that footpadding, so to speak, seems to be the only really paying 
and prosperous profession in this vicinity, we offer the following pro- 
found suggestion to such of our citizens as have not yet made their prepa- 
rations to go into the business: Always carry a cheap oroide watch in the 
vest pocket (having secreted your regular time iiiece in the left boot, or 
at the pawnbrokers), and while passing extra dark places hold in either 
band an uncorked pocket flask and a ham sandwich. The footpad will 
naturally be mollified at being met with doubtless needed refreshments 
instead of resistance, and will walk off with your four dollar a dozen 
stem-winder with perfect amiability. Perhaps it would only be fair to 
add that this admirable plan is suggested by one of our new policemen, 
who has more than once gotten into trouble by arresting prominent and 
influential thieves. 

The Black Sand Diggings on the beach ia another flattering testi- 
monial to the stragetical abilities of our livery-stable keepers, in the pock- 
ets of which ingenious gentlemen the entire bullion products of the 
scheme may be fountL First, it was a decomposed whale which every- 
body was expected to hire a ten-dollar team to go out and sniff at. Then 
a stranded ship was to be blown up, at 3 o'clock, punctually, every day for 
three months, and now the gullible public ia having black sand thrown in 
its eyes, which was quite unnecessary. However, the livery-stable keep- 
ers are financially saved, "which is a good deal, you bet," as one of them 
said, who was on the point of turning his establishment into an anatomi- 
cal museum and admitting folks to look at his collection of architectural 
scarecrows at two bits a head. 

"We have over a dozen absolutely original and beautifully constructed 
perorations, warranted to beat anything ever worked off by Ingersoll or 
Fitch all to pieces, and which we will ship to him on receipt of the price 
and postage. We are at work on one in particular which brings in four-* 
teen planets, the famine in Ireland, Niagara, Julius Ceasar, a tornado 
on the great desert, the bird of freedom, and the tax on soap, all in 
about six lines. These superb figures are written on paper with gummed 
backs, so that they can be pasted into speeches anywhere, and are war- 
ranted strong enough to knock three cheers each out of an audience at 
forty rods. They come four in a box, and are guaranteed to keep in the 
hottest weather. Terms confidential. 

Queen Victoria says that she is quite satisfied with the result of the 
late Congress, except that she regrets this country was not roped into 
the negotiations, as she understands that Mrs. Hayes has a certain sure 
recipe for preventing preserved quinces from turning sour, and which the 
latter won't tell anybody. She thinks Beaconsfield would have wrung it 
out of this Government if he had a good chance. The Prime Minister, 
however, has promised to send a new Ambassador to Washington whose 
wife is more of a quince diplomatist than is Lady Thornton. If that 
fails, Her Majesty says grimly, she will try what a few ironclads will do. 

A cUque of frigid old maids, who congregate at our principal seaside 
resort, are called " Santa Cruz Sours." 



Me Dear Mishter Kamey : Yo'vo taken a janioy, expinscB all paid 
by the Micks left buhoind, an' och ! by this token it's plainly yu'vo srthoken 

tho niatti-iti an' things which ye have im yer nioiml. Hut,"faix. MiHliter 
Karnoy, widtmt any blarney, yer uioiud holds but little if all Iuls bin 
said; for what ye've jist touhf us of '* bloated boiitMiouldern" long winco 
on the Hand- lots was shtinkiu' an' dead. Oi wouldn't desave ye, so ye 
may belave me, we're all disappinted at what ye are doin'; the wcpikin'- 
men'it party is soured, me hearty, an" swears ye are bringin' the bizncBH to 
rooin. The big bugs don't fear ye, the papers all jeer ye ; ye swore they 
should trimble, an , look now, they laugh, so Ui write ye this letter to 
tell ye ye'd better git one n' them fellers for two-an'-a-hj.lf to bo afther 
nmkin' a spache for yer shpakin' that's got Bomething in it to tickle tho 
bhoys ; for ye're iver rcpatin' the same kind o' pratin', an' Denis, mo 
darlint, it's nothing but noise. The bills for yer shtayin' in Boston we're 

Kiyin'; yer trucks are lamentiu' their master, aroon ! So, swate Mishter 
ariiey, con.e back from yer jaruey, come back to the sand-lots and 

PATIUCK Ml'LDOON. 

TERRACE SWIMMING BATHS, 

Foot ofWebster Street, on Central Avenue, Alaoneda Beach 

Now o|»eu to Che |>ubllc, and i»roiiuiiiice4l by ilic ''elite'* 
Sftu l*Yauciscrt and OukliLiiti as the only place for a good hath on the Pa<. 
Coast. Perfect scuurity against nmiisters of the deep, and high wat^r at all tli 
of day and uight. 

Special Accommodations for Ladies Unattended 

Reached in thirtv-tive niinutca from San Fmiicisco hy steamer NEWARK-de 
on the premises - orC. P. It. K. to Mastic SUvtinn, and from Oakland by horse-d 
at Itroadway Station, running within two blocks of iJaths. j 

BATHS, 25 CENTS, 
Including Private Mootttf Bathing Suit, Tmvels, SJiower Baths, e 

July 13. R. HALEY, Proprietoi 



PACIFIC OCEAN HOUSE. 

One of our moat esteemed joumalista went over to Alameda, the 
other day, to enjoy a bath. His glossy mnstache and shininj? black hair 
were the admiration of all the passengers on the way, and as he leaped 
jityously into the surf by crawling down a ladder into two feet of water, 
the grandeur of his actions and the symmetry of his form gained him 
eleven new subscriptions to his enterprising journal. An hour afterward 
an old gentleman with a pale face, white mustache and grey hair was 
nervously demanding his watch and chain and 45 cents which he had left 
for safety \vith the proprietor of the baths, who refused to surrender the 
property on the ground that it was left there by a totally different gentle- 
man, and that if he did not get out of that quick he would give him into 
custody for au attempt at grand larceny. If they don't get a first-class 
barber and fixings over there soon, there won't be a respectable elderly 
gentleman in the city who will give them his patronage. 

The President of the Academy of Sciences was walking through 
the basement of the New City Hall this week, with Professor Biff, of the 
Smithsonian Institute, when they came across a series of large boxes 
painted gray and tilled with sawdust. "These," said the President, are 
intended to cultivate oranges in, seedling oranges, which will hereafter be 
a great ornament to the building and line the coridors." "Ah," said Pro- 
sessor Biff, " I'm glad you explained it; I was just making a note to the 
effect that they were flat-bottomed boats in which to place the records in 
a time of flood." Just at this moment the janitor came up, and with a 
respectful air said, "Gentlemen, if you've done examining that spittoon, 
I'll clean it out." Moral. 

"We are glad to know that efforts are being made to imprison for 
life the heartless wretch who fished a drunken man named Tom Mc- 
Carthy out of the bay last Thursday. If rescuing drowning drunkards is 
not obtaining goods under false pretences, at least it is Neptunious bur- 
glary. There is no encouragement for a feel o' de sea to suicidal drunk- 
ards while sober friends are allowed to haul 'em out like smelts. This 
synonym applies to the breath, and must not be regarded as a joke. 

A pretended John B. Gough has just been exposed in Ohio. He 
deceived the people all very well for a while, but one night he came to 
the lecture Committee chewing cloves. The very first " tiist " the indig- 
nant Chairman gave him broke a bottle of Old Rye in hia coat-tail 
pocket. It says little for the physical benefits of teetotalism that when 
the party crossed the county line the impostor was a hundred yards ahead 
and still gaining. 

The financial newspapers in the East are urging our capitalists to 
lend money to Russia. We advise them not to do it. They will never 
get a cent back. Over four years ago a resident of Petaluma wrote direct 
to the Czar for a box of Russian salve, enclosing the money. Not a word 
has he ever heard in reply, to this day. Nothing but his regard for Nichti- 
las' family has prevented his exposing the whole matter in the Petaluma 
Bwjh long ago. 

If you see a young lady standing pensively against a lamp-post, near 
Sutter and Larkin, for four hours at a stretch, without any apparent ob- 
ject in life; if you see her — well, it's none of your business. She's got a 
transfer and is waiting for one of Casebolt's cars to come along and take 
her to Woodward's Gardens. 

tiV/Wlthout harboring the faintest sentiment of JTreveTenoe, in all sen 
ous earnestness we suggest and recommend that for the proper emulation 
of his race and mankind generally, the all-significant wojxis, "He took a, 
bath every day," be inscribed over Mr. Reese's tomb. 

A writer in Scribner, apealdng of the late W. C. Bryant, says: 
" He was a poet who could take care of bimself and get a living.'* That's 
just the trouble. So many poets have wealthy parents and good health. 
Otherwise — but why aggravate the reader? 

The Girls' High School is. as every one knows, the home of refine- 
ment and the essence of geaitility, and now when the big giris^ meet the 
principal, Mr. John Swett, anywhere, they always allude to him as Pro- 
fessor Perspiration. 

She handed himthens^ni/, whicit commenced,, "Belmont h S,4ow<,1878.'* 
It'aa mighty tinesupper," he continued, looking round, "but Fd have called 
itasupper or a dayjuny, if I'd been Sharon, not a hty out." 

Beaconiield's pons are not the most robust in the world,_but that's no 
reason for Victoria believing he can keep up both stockings with one 
garter. Economy can be carried too far. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETfER AND 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



DRIFTING DOWN. 

A THAMES BAECAHOLLE. 

Drifting down in the gi-ay-green twilight, 

O, the scent of the new-mown hay! 
Soft drip the oars in the myatic shy light, 
O, the charm of the dying day! - 
While fading flecks of bright opalescence 

But faintly dapple a saffron sky, 
The stream flows on with superb quiescence, 
The breeze is hushed to the softest sigh. 

Drifting down in the sweet still weather, 

O, the fra^ance of fair July! 
Love, my love, when we drift together, 

O, how fleetly the moments fly! 
Drifting down on the dear old river, 
O. the J 




C^ommenciiigr Sniitlay, July l4tli, 1S7S, 
J Passenger Trains will leave San Francisco, from 
Passenger Depot on Townsend street, between Third 
and Fourth streets, as foUuwa : ^ 



8 A A.M. daily for San Jose, Gilroy, HolHster, Tres 
.OLf pjnos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all Way 
Stations. ^^ At Pwaro, the Santa Cruz R. R. con- 
nects with this train for Aptos and Santa Cruz. 
^^ At Salinas the M. & S. V. R. R. comiects with 
this train for Monterey. jpW Stage connections made 
iLOR Car attached to this train. 




San Jose and Way Stations 



ij'3 excepted) for Gilroy, Pa- 
iTres Pinos and Way Stations, 
lade with this traiu at Santa 
Springs. 

the Santa Cruz R. R. con- 
,JAR0 for Aptos and Santa 
^rs leave Santa Cruz at 4:30 
ilroy), arriving in San Frau- 

SATURDAVS ONLY, the 

nded to SALINAS, conuect- 

R. for MONTKREY. Re- 

NDAYS (Breakfast at Gil- 

icoat 10:00 A. M. 



Her clear low voice and its tones are bringing 
A mingled melody back to me. 

Drifting down in the clear calm weather, 

O, how sweet is the maiden's song! 
Love, my love, when we drift together, 
0, how quickly we drift along! 

— Lon don World. 

TOO MUCH KNOWI»EDGE. 

There is such a thing as over-educating the 
masses. If Nelly (whose mother— honest wo- 
man and her name is Bridget — takes in washing) 
be taught to thump on a piano, and to simper 
something which sounds like French, ten to one 
she contemns the home in which she was reared, 
and alas! even the mother who reared her. But 
that doting parent's grand aim is to make Nelly 
a *'lady." Nelly is willing, and under such in- 
stigation and tuition she grows in self consequence 
with her years, until, when she doffs her short 
dresses and dons her long ones, it is no wonder 
she is "spoiled." What follows? She contemns 
all her surroundings. Her ideas of a beau are 
of a carpet knight in kid gloves and lavender. 
The honest son of toil, whom she meets in her 
own station, she contemns. Poor Nelly! She 
may, nay she can, very likely find the beau of her 
imagining and the extravagances for which she 
yearns. But when she finds him and them, she 
is lost. The piano and the rest of the ornamental 
fol de rols be hanged. They have a heap to an- 
swer for. So have our republican systems, which 
educate every man into believing that he is quite 
as good as bis neighbor. 

AN ELECTRIC AWAKENER 

Mr. P. Peppard is the inventor of a curious 
contrivance for awakening a sleeper at any re- 
quired hour. The apparatus is to be fixed to an 
ordinary clock ; it is so arranged that when the 
hour-hand of the clock touches a button^ an 
electric circuit is completed: the minute-hand 
passes over the button without effect. There are 
a series of holes for the different hours, into any 
one of which the button can be pushed, accord- 
ing to the time selected for the awakening. The 
completion of the electric circuit may ring a bell, 
or sound any other of the numerous ordinary 
methods of alarm. But this contrivajice has a 
yet more effective method for arousing a deaf 
man or any sleeper who ia willing beforehand to 
prepare himself for a shock, A bracelet is pro- 
vided which can be put on the wrist at the time 
of retiring ; to this flexible wires are attached, 
and the electric discharge will pass through it at 
the appointed hour. A man who could lie down 
to pleasant dreams with such an apparatus fast- 
ened to his wrist would naturally need the vio- 
lence of an electric shock to awaken him — Elec- 
trician. 

C(JN&BD LINE. 

British aufi North American Royal 
Mail Steamships between NEW YORK and LIV- 
ERPOOL, catling at tJUEEMSTOWN, sailing froin New 
York EVERY WEDNESDAY. 

BOTHNIA Myl.*j-Jel9— Jy24— A2S— ....— 2 

ALGERIA My22— Je2ti-Jy31-....— S 4-0 9 

RUSSIA My29— ....— Jy 3~Ag7-Sll— 16 

SCYTHIA Je 5-Jy 10-A 14. .S lS-0 23 

ABYSSINIA Jel2-Jy 17— A21— S25-O30 

Passage can be secured and all information given on 
application to WILLUMS, BLANCIIARD & CO., 

May 18. 218 California st. 



A. A.C\ P-'*'- (daily) for San Jose and Way Stations. 
li O A P.M. (daUy) for Menlo Park and Way Stations. 



^g^ SUNDAYS an EXTRA TRAIN will leave for San 
Jose and Way Stations at 9:30 A.M. Returning, will 
leave San Jose at ti:00 p.m. 

^^" ExcPRSiON Tickets to San Jose and other points 
and return sold on Saturdays and Sunday mornings. 
Good for return until following Monday inclusive. 

&^ Also, EXCURSION TICKETS to MONTEREY— 
Good from Saturday until following; Monday inclusive. 
A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 

H. R. JUDAH, Assistant Passenger and Ticket Agent. 



SOrTHERHr DITISIONS. 

t^?~ Passengers for points on the Southern Divisions 
of the road will take the cars of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road via OAKLAND, leaving SAN FRANCISCO \ia Ferry 
Landing, Market street, at 4:00 p.m. daily, and making 
close connection at GOSHEN for Sumner, Mojave, Los 
Angeles. Wilmington, Anaheim, Colton, Colorado River 
and Yuma. July 27. 



C. p. R. R. 



Commencing Wednesday, July 10th, 1878, and un- 
til farther notice, Trains and Boats will Leave 

SAar FRAXCISCO: 



7r\C\ A. M. (daily), Vallejo Steamer (from Market 
.Ul./ Street Landing — Connecting with Trains for 
Napa (Stages for Sonoma), Calistoga (the Geysers), 
and Sacramento. Connecting at Davis (Sundays except- 
ed) for Woodland, Williams and Knight's Landing. 

(Arrive San Pranciseo 8:55 p.m.) 



8r\(\ A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
*yjyJ land Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland (Or.), Cohax, Reno (Virginia City), Pali- 
sade (Eureka), Ogden and Omaha. Connects at Gait 
with train arriving at lone at 3:40 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 5:35 P.M.) 



land Ferry, arrives at Martinez 10.15 A.M. 
Returning, leaves Martinez 4.10 P M., arrives San Fran- 
cisto 0:00 P.M "Excursion Tickets at Reduced Bates." 



9 0/\ A.M. (Sundays excepted), Northern Railway 
• O" Accommodation Train (via Oakland Ferry) 
to Martinez. (Arrive San Francisco 3:35 p.m. 



3r\C\ P-M. (daily)San Jose Passenger Train (via Oak- 
*\j\J land Ferry and Niles), stopping at all Way Sta- 
tions. Arrives at San Jose at 5;30 p.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a.m.) 



3 0i\ P.M. (daily) Northern Railway PassengerTrain 
• Oyj (via Oakland Ferry) to San Pablo and Mar- 
(Arrive San Francisco 9:35 a m.) 



tmez. 



A f\f\ P.M. (daily) Express Train (via Oakland Ferrj'), 
^•*-'^ for LathropaudStockton, Merced, VisaUa, Sum- 
ner, Mojave, Newhall (San Buenaventura, Santa Barbara), 
Los Akgeles, "Santa Monica," Wilmington, Santa Ana 
(San Diego), Colton and Yuma (Arizona Stages and Colo- 
rado River Steamers). 

".Sleeping Cars" between Oakland, Los Angeles and 
Yuma. Connects at Niles with train arriving at San 
Jose at6:55 P.M. (Arrive San Francisco 12:40 p.m.) 



4- 00 ^' ^^' (Sundays excepteU) Vallejo Steamer (from 
~I^yjyj Market Street Landing), connecting with trains 
for Calistoga, (the Geysers), Woodland, Knight's Land- 
ing and Sacramento ; and at Sacrumento with Pas- 
senger Train, leaving at 9:35 p.m. on Tuettdays, Tfiurs- 
days and 5ai«rdays OH/^,forTruckee, Reno, Carson and 
Virginia. 

" Sleeping Cars " hetween Vallejo and Carson. 

(Arrive San Francisco 11:10 a.m.) 



4C\(\ P-M- (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
t\J\J (from Waah'u St. Wharf), for Beniciaand Land- 
ings on the Sacramento River; also, taking third class 
overland passengers to connect with train leaving Sacra- 
mento at 9:00 A.M,, daily. (Arrive San Francisco8:00 P.M. 



A OA P.M. (daily), TbroughThird Class and Accom- 
■ttsO" modatioii Train, via Lathrop and Mohave, 
arriving at XjOS Angeles on second day at 11:55 a.m. 

(Arrive San Francisco 7:30 A.M. 



FERRIES AND liOCAZi TRAIKS 



From "SAN FKANCISCO," Daily. 





i 
§1 




OAKLAND. 


22 








g< 








o 


A. M. 


p. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


BOlO 


12.30 


7.00 


BO.IO 


7(.0 


1.00 


8.00 


7.S0 


7.30 


1.30 


9.00 


8.30 


8.00 


2.00 


10.00 


9.30 


8.30 


3.00 


11.00 


10.30 


9.00 


3.30 


12.00 


11.30 


9.30 


4.00 


p. M. 


p. M. 


10.00 


4.30 


1.30 


12.30 


10.30 


6.00 


2.00 


1.00 


11.00 


6.30 


■3.00 


3.30 


11.30 


6.00 


4.00 


4.30 


12.00 


6.30 


6.00 


6.30 




7.00 


6.00 


6.30 




8.10 


B"7.00 


7.00 




9.20Ib»8.;0 


8.10 




10.30|c'1030 


9.20 




b11.45'b»1146 


10.30 
Bll.45 






8.00 
♦9.30 
p M. 
tl.OO 
3.00 
4.00 

ts.io 



A. M. 

8.00 
(9.301 



4.00 

ts.io 



East Oakland 



A. M. 
7.30 
8.30 
9.30 
10.30 
1130 
p. M. 
1.00 
4.00 
6.00 
6.00 






B6.10 
8.0O 
10.00 
p. M. 
3.00 
4.30 
6.30 
6.00 



Change Cars 

at 
West O'kland 



n^Sundays excepted. c— Sundays only. 

^Alameda Passengers change ears at Oakland. 

To FERNSIDE—exeept Sundays— 7.00, 9.00, 10.00 
A.M., and 5:00 p.m. 

To SAN JUSE— Daily— 19:30 A.M., 3:00, 4:00 P-M. 



To " SAN FBANCISCO," Dally. 






< 


ai 


Q 


FROM 


a 


< 






s|3 

< 


OAKLAND. 
(Broadway.) 


A. »1. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


B6.30 


B5.40 


B-6.00 


t6.46 


t7.08 


B6.10 


B6.20 


12.20 


8.00 


7.30 


B'5.40 


7.55 


8.15 


B5.50 


B6.00 


12 60 


10.00 


8.30 


•6-25 


11.15 


11.35 


6.40 


6.50 


1.20 


p. M. 


9.30 


7.00 


tll.46 


p. M. 


7.40 


7.20 


1.60 


3 00 


10.30 


8.03 


P. M. 


tl2.03 


8.40 


7.60 


2.60 


4.30 


11.30 


9.00 


3.40 


4.03 


9.40 


8.26 


3.20 


6.30 


p. M. 


10.03 




t4.45 


10.40 


8.50 


3.50 












11.40 
P. M. 
12.40 


9.20 
9.50 
10.20 


4.20 


4.00 12,00 
5.00 p. M. 






4.60 






6.20 




6.00 


1.00 






1.26 
2.40 


10.60 
11.20 
11.60 


6.60 




6 26 


^ y 


■3.20 
4.00 


^ y 






' 


' 


5.40 


8.00 






6.00 


6.40 




9.10 


Chang 


eCare 


6.03 


tChange Cars 7.60 




10.20 






B*7.20 










)aklnd. 


B'8.30 


East Oakland 10.10 








I»10.00 









'a—Sundays excepted. 
♦Alameda Passengers change cars at Oakland. 
From FERNSIDE— except Sundays— S. 00, 10.00, : 
A.M., and G.O0 P.M. 
FROM SAN JOSE-Daily-7;05 and 8:10 A.M. 



TREEK ROUTE. 

From SANFRANCISCO-Z'a«y-B6:30,B7:20, 8:15,9:15. 

10:15, 11:15 a.m , 12:15, 1:15, 2:25, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 

0:15 p.m. 
From 0AKLANT>— Z>ai/y— b6:20, b7:10, 8:05,9:05,10:05, 

11;05 A.M., 12:05. 1:05,2:15, 3:05, 4:05,5:05,6:05 P.M. 

a— Daily, Smidays excepted. 



"Official Schedule Time" furnished by Anderson & 
RAsnoLPU, .Jewelers, 101 and 103 Montgomery St., S. F. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass, and Ticket Agt. 
A. N. TowNE, General Superintendent. 



S> Pa R* R« 

(NORTHEBN DIVISION.) 
SPECIAL ANNOUN CEMENT. 

C'^ommencing^ Sntnrday, Jnly 13, 1S7S, 
J EXCURSION TICKETS will he sold by this Com- 
pany from SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN JOSE AND OTH- 
ER POINTS AND RETURN, 

At Greatly Heduced Bates. 
(Tickets to San Jose, good for Return hy either the 
Southern or Central Pacific Railroads.) 

These Tickets will he sold ONLY on SATURDAYS and 
SUNDAY MORNINGS. 

The RETURN TRIP Ticket will not be good for pas- 
sage after the MONDAY following the date of purchase. 
TICKET OFFICES— Passenger Depot, Townsend St., 
and at Valencia street Station. 

A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent. 

H. R. JUDAH, Ass't Passenger and Ticket Ag't. 

Ilfotlce."SAN JOSE Excursion Tickets (viaC. P. R. 

R.) can be purchased at the olfices of the Central Pacific 

Railroad, Oakland Ferry, foot of Market street. San 

Francisco; also at the several Ticket Offices in Oakland. 

[July 20. J 



Aug. 10, 1878. CALIFOUNIA ADVKUTISER. 13 | 


Notabllla. 


COUNTRY RESORTS. 


THE "AUTOMATIC." 
Wbat rnnkcH Iho HeaniKtrfsfi' t»»il but plfty» 

A* ttiU-ntlv. witliMUt lioluv. 
It »hi^\K's i-ach tuck t4. f..ia away? "AUTOMATIC." 
Wl)»t HvWH with ti|>t-e(l, ami runt* »o lij^'ht 

0"cr uilki-n rulws nr Hcec-y whito. 
And leaves uo a«hiuK' bonc» at iiijs'ht? "AUTOMATIC." 
OflSce of " Automatic " Machine, 124 Poat street 


SWANTON HOUSE, PESGADERO. 

rpiilM Populiir IIot«l, toiccthvr nlth the ilolnohoil rottHire«, 

1 M. whUh iiru hot Ihc k-a--t of Im iUIr.M-tivL- rfiitur«.*.s, hnve Ik-uu riuwh funiiHli.-il 
; IhriiUifhiiut, uni) arc now uirhi for thi' rt'ciiitiim of ;.nii'»t-'*. Thojit; duj-iriiiir to vihit 
. tho uiuett viijo>ubl« u( all our suattiik- rvMorli', t-.m iiuiku no mUUku in dcciilinif uihiii 
Poacmlcro. 

IT 13 EASILY REACHED, 
and is unsuniiuwud in the cxccilomc >if its uliiuuU), Uio btiiut;- of its scenery, and in 
the ottnictivfiicsN of iu truly reinarkublu sou buacli. Those- extnionlhiary |n-bl>lc8, 
an)on}( wiiirh nru to he found aj.nitfs, ojmla, sappliiros, etc., wurc nuvvr ho nunitrnus 
M now. the iwist WinttT hrtvhii.' ihnnvn u|> iuuneusc nuinbunj of uuriouHly-Nhtiiwd 
stones, whiuli for iiircH have tio* ii Mibitciwl to tbo cverkistinh' inotlona of tho tireletw 
Pacific. tiUOU TlKiUT KlSlllNti in ol.tiiii.iiblu in the IVscadero river. 
^B^ The hotel prices are fixed to suit the times. [April 27. 

TERRACE SWIMMING BATHS, 

Foot of Webster Street, on Central Avenue, Alameda Beach. 
"VToH- open to (.lie public, nufl itronoiiiiceil by the "'elite" of 

i.1 Sun l-Vancisco and Uuklaud ajj the only plueu for a jfood bath on tbu I'uL-itie 
Coust. Perfect security apiinat monsters of tiiu deep, and hi),'h water at all times 
of day and uiylit. 

Special Accommodations for Ladies Unattended 

Reached in thirty-live minutes from San Francisco l»y steamer NEWARK- depot 
on the premises - or C. P. it. H. to Mustic SUition, and from Oaitland by horae-cars 
at itroailway Station, runnini.' within two bioclcs of liatlis. 

BATHS, 25 CENTS. 

Includiitff Private Room, Bathing Suit, TowcJs, Shower Saths, etc, 

July 13. R. HALEY, Proprietor. 

PACIFIC OCEAN HOUSE. 

SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA; - 
rilbis elegant estnbliMhincut has been comiilctcly renovateil 

X throub'hout, and oilers special attractions and inducements to the public. 
Tho addition of a lar^'e play and CROtiUET grounds, the increasine of DANCING 
acconmiodationa, are the latest improvements for the pleasure of the guests. It is 
the ONLY liotel at Santa Cruz that can claim pre-eminence aa a FIRST-CLASS 
HOUSE ot entertainment, being the best regulated and sustained in this famous 
summer resort. [May 11.] J. H. HOADLEY, Pioprietor. 

OCEAN VILLA. 

SANTA CRTJZ. CALIFORNIA. 
^eorge IT. Bliss, Proprietor.-- LHrj;e, well-l'urnlslieil Rooms, 

\jf Single or in Suites. Cottages for families that desire them. Grounds large, 
romantic and pleasant. Situated forty feet above tide water, having a beautiful view 
ot the liay. Ocean, City and Mountains. Premises extend to rivers edge, affording 
rare facilities for Boa.ting, Bathing and Fishing. No pains simred to please our 
guests. P. 0. Box lUlJ. July 13. 

THE GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL. 

OAKLAND. CAL. 
X C Olmsted is hnppy to uiinoaace to bis frleuils and the 

^ • public that he has becuine associated with MR. J. W. BLACK, and it is pro- 
posed to maite THE URAND CENTRAL as popular as it was during his former three 
years management. The prices for board and rooms are as reasonable aa any one 
eould desire, and the house and table will be kept fully up to its former reputation. 
Oakland, May 1, 1878. May 18. 

PARISIAN HOUSE. 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA. 
rrifae proprietor of tlie above favorite resort takes pleasare 

JL in informii.g his patrons and the public that he has entirely renovated his cs- 
tablishraeut, to which he has added a splendid Garden, with Arbors, Swings, and ev- 
erything for the comfort and amusement of visitors. Board and Lodging for Fam- 
ilies by the week or month at moderate prices. 
April 13. ETIENNE SIVIEROU, Proprietor. ■ 

TAMALPAIS HOTEL. 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA. 
rrihis lionse has been 1 i^orouj^hly renovated and newly f nr- 

JL nished, and is now op?n to the public. Persons wishing rooms should apply 
early. Climate unsurpassed. Tcims moderate. Special Rates for Families. 
June 22. OSCAR LKWIS, Proprietor. 

SANTA CRUZ, 

T Iddeirs Cottag-es, on the Beach. Pleasant and Commo- 

X-i dious Rooms. Fine Scenery. SIO per Week. Surf Bathing Included. July 13. 


An EngL-Bh gentleman once hW from hia horse and injured his 
tliuiiib. '1 hf p,iin imreaf iiiK' he was (tl>li(;red to send for a surgeon. One 
day the d<M;ti>r \\n» unable to visit his patient, and therefore sent his sou 
iudtt-ad. *' Have you visited the Ki)Kli»hman? " said the father in the 
eveiiiuK'. " Yea." replieil the youn^; man, " and I have drawn out a 
thorn, whieh I found to be the chief cause of his ayoiiy." " Fool! " ex- 
claimed the father, "I trusted you had more sense ; now there is an end 
to the job! " 


"There's no denijiug of it, Betsey," was a favorite expression of 
Sairey Uauiiw', and nnc that would be forever in her mouth were she alive 
t<i-day. There i^ nn denijiu),' of it, that of all fraud-ridden places in the 
world, San Fr.atu-isco is the worst, and especially so in the matter of adul- 
terated food. Probably bread, pies and jjastry contain more impurities 
than anything else, and the only way to obviate this evil is for every 
housekeei>er ti> buy DonnoUy's Yea^t Powder. It is the best and purest. 
Ask your grocer for it once, and you will never use any other. 


For upwards of thirty years Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup has 
been used for children. It corrects acidity of the stomach, relieves wind 
colic, rejjulates the bowels, cures dystntery and diairb<ea, whether arising 
from teething or other causes. An old and well-tried remedy. Twenty' 
Jivt cents a bottte. 


Peace, my heart, it is not love ; That I would not eat again 
This is what I fain would prove, In a restaurant far or wide, 
In the bitterness of that woe Except in Swain's, on the south side 
Which oppressed me lon^' ago. Of Sutter st., (21H) the only place — 
Then I made a vow, ah! theu, This Swain's indeed a Celebrated Case. 


A Scotch nobleman one day visited a lawyer at his ofRce, in which, 

at the time, there was a blazing fire, which led him to exclaim, Mr. , 

"your office is as hot as an oven." " So it should be, my lord," replied 
the lawj-er, " it is here I make my bread." 


A Novelty for Cricketers.— Messrs. Webster & Larkin, of Picadilly, 
have introduced a novelty which will no doubt be appreciated by those 
who love the typically British game of cricket. " Cricket Extraordinary" 
is a series of twelve highly finished chromes, which humorously illustrate 
the principal terms used in the game, and which are to be bought at a 
very reasonable price. 

"Well, cook, what is it yon complain of?" "Complain of Mum? 
Well, Mum, and I think its enough to make anybody complain, when 
your work's so hard as it's nearly worn me to a skellinton !" She weiglied 
but three hundred pounds/ 


True poetry the painter's power displays — 
True painting emulates the poet's lays — 
True pictures from Bradley & Rulofson's come, 
The only place in which they're done. 


The fashion for dresses this summer will be a good deal like that of 
last summer, particularly with those who are compelled to wear last sum- 
mer's dresses. 


Like leaves on trees the race of man is found- 
Now green in youth, now withering on the ground. 
Just drink of Cassin's Whisky and you'll find 
You to your youth it's sure to bind. 


Teacher: " Why was Joseph put into the pit ? " Thomas (who goes 
to the theater on week days): Because there was no room for him in the 
family circle. 


GREAT SACRIFICE 

f\r Pianos and Organs for Thirty I>ays. The largrestock ol 

\^ Hallet, Davis & Co.'s Pianos and George Woods ^fi. Co.'s Organs will be sold at 
less than cost for the next thirty days. These celebrated instruments are the leading 
Pianos and Organs of the world, consisting of Grand, Square and Upright Pianos and 
Organs of everystyle. WM. G. BADGER & CO., 
July 27. Nos, 7 and 9 Sansome street, near Market. 


On the lone island's utmost verge there stood. 
Of poplars, pines and firs a lofty wood, 
Of which we took and made a steady blaze 
In Montanya's range, and then did gaze. 

If the ladies insist upon dressing the hair much higher, they will have 
to go on their knees through the doors of the theaters. 


FURTHER REDUCTION. 

THE SEATTLE C O A I. , 

CHJSAPEB XUAJr XBE CBBAPBST. 

^r- Ask Your Dealer for it. 

[Jane 22.] 


He sat like patience on an ottoman 
Waiting his wife to put her bonnet on. 
To go with him to have some Napa Soda 
And other things that will not load her. 


W. Morris. Joa. Schwab. J. F. Kenki!OY. 

MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO., 

Tmporters and J>ealers in Moldfng^s, Frames, Eng>i*avln^8, 

JL Chromos, Lithographs, Decalcomanie, Wax and Ai'tista' Materials, 21 Post 
street, nearly opi>osite Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Feb. 4. 


WTiy is chess a decidedly honorable game? Because you always "act 
on the square." 


Straight mine eye hath caught new pleasm-es. 
Whilst the landscape round it measures- 
It can see without the glasses 
Landsberger's champagne in greatest masses. 

In Yokohama they had Fourth of July and an earthquake within 
tliret days. 


THOMAS DAY, 

Tmporter of every variety of Gas Fixtures, Crystal, Gilt, 

i Steel and Bronze, and a full assortment of Marble and Bronze Clocks and fine 
Bronzes; also a full line of Plumbers' Goods. 122 and 124 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco. Jan. 27. 

FRANK KENNEDY, 

T aw Office, 604 Merchant Street. --Probate, Divorce, Baub- 

M A ruptcy, and other cases attended to. Rents, and all Qthor demands, collected, 
bad tenants ousted. Charge taken of real estate for resklfints, or absentees. Charges 
very reasonable. Ja«. 12. 


"Voltaire" is the title of a new daily paper which was announced to 
appear in Paris last week. 



u 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTJ^P AND 



Aug. 10, 1878, 



THE FETE AT BEIiMONT. 

San !FiL\Ncrsco, Au^uat 9th. 
Dear News Letter—The wit, beauty and elegance of San Francisco 
assembled in force, last evening, at the country home of Senator Sharon, 
in response to the following card of invitation: 

MR. WM. SHARON 

BEQUESTS THE PLEASURE OF TOUR COMPANY 
AT BELMONT, 
Thursday Evening, Aurmst EigJUk. 
Cars leave cor. Third and Townseiid streets at eight o'clock. 

s. s. V. p. 

Upon the arrival of the cars, bon-6re3 werebuming and carriages in wait- 
ing. Throughout the grounds of Belmont, and from the entrance to the 
porte-cochere, were scattered innumerable parti-colored Chinese lanterns. 
Nothing could be finer than the effect of the beautifully illuminated drive 
ending with the stately mansion whose every window shone out light and 
welcome. Within the house reigned hospitality as generous and elegant 
as it was kindly and simple. In receiving his guests, Senator Sharon was 
assisted by his daughters, Mrs. Frank Newlaiids and Mias Sharon, and 
by several lady friends. Probably a more beautiful ball has never been 
given in California. The tout ensemble of the different rooms was remark- 
ably fine. It seemed as if the whole floral world had been put under 
contribution to furnish worthy adornment for this most magnificent ftte. 
Great masses of azaleas, caraelias, stephanotis and roses charmed the 
senses with their mingled beauty and perfume. Stately lilies and trem- 
bling ferns were not more admired than the massive foliage of the laurel, 
the anonymous and other ornamental leafed plants. Wreaths of smilas 
drooped their glossy brightness from chandeliers and columns. Every 
corner, every table and every mantel shelf held a charming floral greeting. 
Great vases and bowls of rare porcelain were overflowing with jasmine, 
stephanotis, and other exotics. The beautiful balcony-room was a marvel 
of artistic floral decoration, and more than one ardent Romeo and blush- 
ing Juliet, leaning over the silver balcony rails, were as much alone as if 
under the darkness and the stars. 

A delightful surprise was the fernery, which reminded one of the sylvan 
court of a fairy queen. All varieties, from the giant tree-fern to the del- 
icate maiden-hair, were here represented. AsparkHng cascade fell into a 
tiny lake, where innumerable gold-fish disported themselves right merrily, 
and almost seemed to enter into the enjoyment of the happy hour. A 
moist atmosphere, the tinkle of falling waters, and a dim light, made it 
almost possible to imagine one's self in the heart of some forest glen. But 
any such illusion was quickly dispelled by the far-off sound of dance 
music, the glitter of diamonds, and the frou-frou of silk, as some stately 
dame or blushing demoiselle wandered int(j this quiet retreat. 

The noble music-room at Belmont was never seen to greater advantage. 
The numberless mirroi-s added to the apparent size of the apartment, and, 
multiplying each fair form, seemed to make an endless vista when the 
marble statues shone out calm and cold, in juxtaposition with the rich 
green of growing plants, and contrasted finely with the living figures mov- 
ing in the mazy bewilderment of the dance. 

As Lady Mary Wortley Montagu once said: *'We meet with cham- 
pagne and a chicken at last ;" and we can do no better than follow such 
an illustrious example, although in our case it was viore than "a chicken." 

Harder, the famous cook of the Palace Hotel, a man with immense 
reputation in the culinary world, "out-Heroded Herod" on this occasion, 
and the table groaned under the weight of every delicacy of the season. 
Wonderful pagodas and baskets of sugar frost work and candy, and as- 
tonishing bastions and forts of pastry were observed only to be devoured. 
On the supper table lovely flowers were seen in profusion, and lent a re- 
fined grace to what is usually a very commonplace and substantial re- 
ality. One notable feature of the supper table were the menu cards, 
printed on dainty tinted satin with lace trimmings. Two large rooms 
were used for supper, and by an excellent system of sliding doors the 
two apartments and adjacent corridors made an immense supper hall. 
Ice cream and beef tea, with several kinds of punch, and a great variety 
of wines were served from the time the guests arrived until the last one 
departed. The following is the menu : 

BEIiSEOKT, LE 8 AOTJT 1878. 
Sonper."9Ienn. 

Ckaud. 
HuStres ii la Poulette. Bouchfies de Clovis. Hultres frites. Terrapin i la Maryland. 

Entrees Froides. 
Filets de volaille en chaufroix. Fuie gras de Strasbourg en bordures. Cotelettes 
de chevreuil k la Dorscey. Salade de langoustes ^ la Bagration. Salade de volaille 
^ la mndeme. 

Grosses Pieces Froides. 
Le Fort Malakoff en pain de Gibier, i la Saint Hubeot. Bastion rustiqueen galan- 
tine de cochoii dc lait. Jamboii de Virg'inie en damier. Filets de bosuf i la Russe. 
Galantine dc dindes k la baiiqui^re. Langucs de tooDuf ii I'ecarlate. 



Charlotte Ma Russc GeMe i la Macedoine. Giteaux assortis. Bonbons en sur- 
prise. Gloces grands moules k la Na|)olitaine. Glaces en petits moules fantaisie. 
Pitce de milieu en nougat jardiniere. Pagoda chinoise ^ la moderne. Fontaine pas- 
tillage ^ la Florentine. Mosaic k la Ninon. Ck)rne d'abondance k la Parisieune. 

Bafraick issements. 

Punch au Champagne. Orangeade. Oigeat. Groseilles. 
Vhaud. 

Conaoram6 de volaille en tasses. Barvaroises, Au lait d'amandes et mexicaines, 
CaK. Vins. 

After having obtained that refreshment which is so necessary for the 
intellectual effect required to do justice to the charming toilettes, your 
"Looker-on in Vienna" devoted himself to obtain for the News Letter a 
correct detail of the most notable costumes. 

Mrs. Newlands— Pearl gros grain, with trimming of pink silk and 
white point lace. Magnificent diamond necklace and eardrops. 

Miss Sharon — Pale green silk, with same color crepe de chine overdress, 
and pink coral ornaments. 

Mrs. J. D. Fry — Pale blue silk, with lace overdress looped with blush 
roses. Diamond ornaments. 

Mrs. M. I). L. Simpson — Black satin, embroidered in the same color; 
point lace shawl and stone cameo ornaments. 



These ladies received with Mr. Sharon, and were grouped in the Red 
Parlor. Perhaps the handsomest dress in the room was that of Mrs. 
Flood. It was of rich black satin trimmed with magniffcent white poiut 
lace. This lace was so fine and beautiful that it was more than a mere 
garniture and almost a work ot art. 

Mrs. Field's dress was also unique and handsome. It was of cream- 
Cfdored silk cohered with Russian lace, and here and there a flash of scar- 
let and glimmer of gold; necklace and ear ornaments, pearls. 

Mrs. Volney Spalding's costume was much admired. It was of maroon 
velvet and pink brocade. 

Among other pretty dresses we observed: Mrs. H. L. Dodge — Black 
velvet and white brocade, trimmed with violets. 

Mrs. M. Castle — Cardinal red silk with blue ro.se8. 

Mrs. Peter Donahue— White silk trimmed with Chantilly lace. 

Mrs. Gouverneur Morris— Blue trimmed with pink and white point 
lace. 

Miss Marian Gushing — White muslin looped with smilax; very pretty 
and girlish. 

Miss Wooster — Pink silk trimmed with pink crepe de chine; pearl or- 
naments. 

Miss Bessie Sedgwick — ^White silk and white lace overdress looped with 
convolvulus. 

Miss Miller— White striped gauze; very light and pretty. 

Miss Ida Davis — Pale blue silk brocade trimmed with blush roses. 

Miss Bessie Simpson — White silk slip, with overdress of white organdy, 
trimmed with Valenciennes lace. 

Mrs. Irving Scott's costume was a lovely bewildering mass of ecru silk, 
lace, pink brocade and maroon colored roses. 

Mrs. Lent — Black velvet, ecru satin trimming, and head dressed with 
plumes and diamonds. 

Miss Lent — White silk covered with Brussels net, looped with morning 
glory flowers. 

Mrs. McLaughlin's costume was very handsome and richly embroid- 
ered in pink roses. 

Mrs. Alvinza Hayward- Black satin and diamonds. 

Airs. Evan Coleman— Pink brocade, with pearl ornaments. 

Mis Carrie Gwin — Pink silk, trimmed with chenille fringe. 

Mi-8. Towne — Black velvet and white lace. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Compaiiy^s steamers h-SII sail as follows at 13 St.: 
CITY OF TllKIO, Aufust 31st, tor YOKOHAMA nnil HOIJGKONG. 

GRANADA, Aucrust 19th, tor PANAMA and NEW YORK, calling at ACAPULCO, 
SAN-JOSK DEGUATEMALA, LA LIBERTAD and PUNTA ARENAS. 

Tickets to and from Europe by any line for sale at the lowest rates. 

CITY OF SYDNEY, Sept. ad, at 12 o'clock, M., or on arrival ot the English mails, 
for HONOLULU, AUCKLAND and SYDNEY. 1(10 additional is charged for pas- 
sage in Upper Saloon. 

CITY OF PANAMA, August 10th, tor VICTORIA, PORT TOWNSEND, SEATTLE, 
and TACOXLA, connecting at TACOMA with Northern Pacific Railroad for PORT- 
L.AND, Oregon. Tickets must be purchased before 11 A.M. on day of sailing, at 
\Vhai-f OtBce. For freight or passage apply at the otliee, cor. First and Brannan sts. 

August 10. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., Agents. 

JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1UQ.\ 
rribe attention of Sportsmen Is Invited to the following' 

M Ammunition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, 
India and the Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof and F 3 Quality Percussion 
Caps; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding; Joyce's Gas-Tight Car- 
tridges, for Piu-fire and Central-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Ciirtridges, for killing 
game at long distances, and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold by 
all gun-makers and dealers in gunpowder. 

FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Dec. 30. 57 Upper Thames street, London. 



THE NEW GYMNASIUM. 

Athletic Cnrricniam, No. 232 Sutler street, X, M, C. A. 
Budding, San Francisco. Prof. ALFRED PERRIER, Teacher of Athletics; 
Mons. A. VAUTHIER, Assistant Teacher of Athletics ; Prof. HARRY MAYNARD, 
Teacher of Boxing. The Best Appoijited Gymnasium on the Pacific Coast. Open 
Daily (Sundays excepted) from 10 o'clock a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and from 7:30 to 10 p.m. 
Terms— PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Adults, .?2 per month. Boys and Misses under 
10 years of age, SI per month. Lessons in Boxing and Fencing, Extra. June 22. 



REMOVAL. 

The Office of tlie Golden Chariot IWlning- Company, Diana 
Gold and Silver Mining Company, Golden Gate Con. Hydraulic Sliniog Com- 
pany, Minnietta Belle Silver Mining Company, and Hazard Gravel Mining Company, 
has removed from Room 22, Merchants' Exchange, to 



July 13. 



Booms 13 and 14. 318 Fine Street. 

J. T. McGEOGHEGAN, Secretary. 



REMOVAL. 

Laver A Cnrlett, Architect:!*, fnrnlsta Plans, Specifications 
and Superintendence fur the Construction or Renovation of Dwelling Houses 
and every description of Building. Ofiice : 19 S. F. Stock Exchange Building, Pine 
street, San Francisco. [Take the Elevator.] June 15 



H. 



REMOVAL. 

W. Patrick, Teacher of tiie Piano, has moved his res- 
idence to 113 PAGE STREKT, San Francisco. July 13. 



QUICKSILVER. 

or sale — In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell, ITo. 305 Sansome 

street, over Eank ot California. Nov. 16. 



F' 



W 



ALICE ROSE, 

ooil Engraver, R06 Dloutsomery street, 

story, San Francisco. 



Boom 31, third 

April 6. 



LIVERMORE COLLEGE. 

Boarding' and Day School for both sexes. Xext term beg-ius 
JULY 2i*, 1878. For Catalogues address J. D. SMITH, PrindpaJ, 

■'"'y 2. Livermore, Alameda county, California. 

OFFICES OF THE AEROPLANE NAVIGATION CO.. 

Jan. 4. No. 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco. 



Ang 10, 1878. 



CALIFOUNIA ADVEUTISEU. 



16 



REAI. ESTATE TRANSACTIONS. 

Beeorded In the City and County of San Franouoo. California, for the 
two Weoks ending Augnat 7, 1878. 

OompUedjywnthe Hen^rdnqf the Ma-cantile Ajfeney of John McKUXoptt tVf., 
401 Vdt\forn'M Strtft^ Sun J^rancuco. 



Wednesday, July 3l8t. 



QHAHTOR AMD ORANTBB. 



DKScBirrioN. 



Olor N Florlnr to Anna O Plorlnei 

O S A^hton to Siicfili K Aahton... .i 
edvvt) Dcxicr to Jo!> 1> Dcxicr 

I) K AppK'ton to Kliziibcih J lloat;' 

A Hfinnu- to J S rarteotis 

Cba» U Kllluy to Emily M Uussel 

OeoS KIttritlffetoHF Carroll.... 
(iiilt>tr|>)K> PiTUEZo lo It Perazzol 

Win Hftfc to Icunc Hintte I 

tiooryc Kdwurdt* to Michael SmiUi 
Daniel Scales to Mnry A I^throp. 
S«v» iind Ln Soc'y to Jiio Snnborn] 

Jliclil Uruiiian lo M foettllo I 

Kniririsco (Jnrcin to W II Mend.' 

Win J Itlafk to Howiint Black I 

"Wm UoUIp toPiiirii-k Untitran 

Alice S Alleu to Rirhiirci Slnnot.. 
S F Sav Vnion lo Tl.on Miiyce....] 

Antonio MiPteuich foGMontanorOi 

B'rd T L Comra to Pntk McGowan' 
Saml Lancdon lo .Tno McKinnell..! 
Geo H C'liriBtian lo J no liall..,. 
Epiiraim Frnok to J Eirschfield..! 

Marv Shea lo Catherine Snllivan.. 
JaBO'SiiUivan lo Wm Rollins I 



N l'ine.80r.;«w Fillmore, w »l..t>4xl37:(; 

K KiUmore, 1)3 n Green, n 30xS7:ii;» 

Lotd 178 to 19»; lolsdsl. 223, IloUidny 

Mtip A 

N I'nioil. OTrfi Larktn, c 40x.^7:0 

K Valencia. 3-1.^ k Ridley, n ,V in x UHlIt 
Conimencin:; I"27:6 w Octavla iind 120 n 

t Hro.uKviiv, >v 10 X n 25 

W Itarilelt. 120 n 230. n 40x125 

!e Siockuin. i;JT:iin Green, n 30x57:6.... 

|H Slitter. 37: i e La;;iina, c 2!»x95 

|Se 17i)i and Htiusilap, c 65x75 

Lots 1547, 1548,1549. 1550. Gifr Map No:l 

Nvv T;iylor and Clay, w ttSx*'>7;6 

Nw Minna. 205 eiv 3d, »\v 20x70 

Se;Mlh andB.ci 10(1x240 

:W Mission, 160n20ili, n 35x9n 

;N nill, 190 w VftlCDcia. w 30x114 

IE Uartlord, 195 ii Iflih.n 23x125 

;Ne Sill ttv. 300 eeB.ee 75, ne 100. pe 25. 

ne 100, nw 100, ew 200 lo beginning.. 
Und >^ n Greenwicli,81:4 w Slocktou. \v 

26:tix45:5 

S Uani^on, 142:6 e 5th. e 32-6xl«0 

Sc Jupan av and Madrid, e 100x:i00 

N Clay, nSw Polk, w 50sl27:8!!i 

E Scoiland, 2fl:8\i 8 ?tIonti: ornery Ave, e 

25. e 45:()ii, nw 32:fl,V, w 2Si?i to beg 

Sw Scott and Pino, s 22:2s82:(l 

Nw Sacra iiento nndScolt,n 27:8Mx8l:3 



5 
500 
Gilt 

5 

1,275 

5 

22.000 

3,200 

1 

3,000 

4,(K5S 

525 

250 

100 

20 

600 

9,000 

500 
Gift 
4.000 



Thursday, August 1st. 



E B McLanshlin to MMcLmighlimS Pine, 81:3 w Webster, w 25x100 



Iliisb Farley to M A Cachot 

T S Wilson to A C Si-arle 

United Ld Asn to Jnrob Snyder.. 

Geo Yon Stadcn to Wm Hale 

W M Dicpins lo A C Diccins ct al 

Geo Trent to Calli Putl ridge 

E F Dennison lo W E Dennison.. 



Slrphcn C Walsh to Sar.-ih Kelly.. 
J W Ilendrie to United Land Asen 
A N Drown to Amelia H Hamill . , 



J H Applc^ate lo Sume. 
WrnLUhlcr to " " 



W Chenerv, 114 s Grove, 8 30x125 

S Pine, 81:3 w Webster, w 2JxI00 

W Sliotwell. 100 n ISIh, D 25x22:6 

Lot .359, Gift Mapl 

Und \i lots 29, 68, 09, 70. blk 0. Flint Tct 

W Howard, 3o n 24th, n 30x122:6 

N 14th. 170:8 e Howard, n 22t lo Creek 

lane, w 15:2 s 214, c 12:7,'^ to be<? 

W Stamford, ISi u Townsend, n 50.\S0. . 
All the Side Lands in w X of M B liO. . . 
Lois 2,3, 4. blk 9; lots 1,2, 3, blk 11, 

San MipnelCity 

Lois 1.2, 3, blk 11; lot 2, blk 9, same... 



o Ida Degener |Ne Eddy and Laguna. e 46x120 .. 

N Randolph N Eddy, 112:6 e Lagana, e 25x121 



Slime lo Lacy ] 

F Bnrnei58 lo Mary G Geragbty. , 



Jno Eeardon to Asa Fisk 

Wm Rollins to U E n.'mpel 

Jno Center lo Jlary MeSwiney... 
S BrignardelloloC S de Bornal.. 
Same to Same 



Wm Girzekowpfcy to C Holje 

E'ijah Case to Wm Girzekowsky.. 

Mary J Welsh to T J W^cltsh 

Jas "E Gordon to Mary A Edwards 



120.. 



N 22d, 90 c Valencia, c 35, n 60:10, w35:l 
s 58:6 to beginning 

N Geary, 165 e Lyon, e 27:6x1.37:6 

Nw Scott and Sacramento, n 27:8?>ixSl;2 

EShotwell, 137:6 n2:id, n 30x122:6 

S Greenwich. 60 w Taylor, w 30x90 

Und }^ e Sansome, 45:10 n Jackson, n 
22:11x1.37:6; and nnd 3-10th8 e San- 
some, r^:9 Q Jackson, n 22:11x137:6... 

Lots 3, 22, blk 33, Case Tract 

Same 

W Capp,35pl9th,8 30xl(M:6 

Se Sanchez and Jer.-'ey, s 114x175 



I 1 
1 

10 
475 

6 
400 

1 

100 

5 

40,000 

1 

85 
7,100 
3,125 

4,000 

1 

4,200 

i.rm 
1,000 



6,850 
(Jilt 
1,200 
l,li50 
3,500 



Friday, August 2d. 



WmHollis to Gastaf Sormau 

BpuJ Pnrker to Terence O'Brten.. 
Tiniolhy Flyou to Wm Harney. . . 
United Ld Aan lo Francis Spring. 



Richd B Irwin to Lonig Slosa... 

Ellen Clarlie lo Wm Hale 

Wm Hale to Patrick l!io 

Wm Wissing to F \V Wlssing... 
United Ld Apd to Wm Biptrup.. 
Chu» RusB to F O Wegener 



N Clinton Park, 142 w Goerrero, w 25 x 

75 . 



Sava and Ln Soc to Cath Ryan. . . 
E P Clement to Cbas H Stanyan. 



Henry Lampraan to Chae Perkins. 
Wm McColl to T El lard Beaua 



T Eltard Bean? to Lonis McColl . . 

Wm McColl to Same 

Ang C Krnger to Jacob Milchkus. 

Same lo Same 

Bmille Burg to L Tillman 



Lot 11, blk 123, Mission View Hnmest'd 
Nw Clementina, 107:6 ne 6th, ne 57:6x70 
E Mission, 210 s 17tli, a 75. e 245, n 100. 

w 122:6, s 25, w 122:6 to beginning 

Ne Pine ond Van Ness, n 10.3:1^1137:6. 

Lots 128, 130, Gift Map 1 

Same 

Lots 192. 194,Gitt .Map 1 

WFol8om,100e nth, s 24x122:6 

Und 1-9 sw Pine and Montgomery, w 

160:5, s 137:0. e 22:11, 8 137:6, e 137:6, 

n 275 to beginning 

W Mission, 81 s Brook, s 26, w 128, n 25 

e 1.32:9 

Und 1-12 commencing 10 chns w frm ne 

cor of nw ii Section 1, Tp 2 s, R 6 W 

E Howard, 225 n 18th, n 50x122:6 

Properly as in 740 D 35, except lot 11, 

740 D 35, 733 D 309, in trnst 

Band W 551 

Same 

W Alabama, 3.38 B 2 th, 8 26x100 

W Alabama, 124 n 21st, n 26x100 

E Dolores, 100 n 2131, th 92:6, s 60, w 92:6 

to commencemeDt 



$3,600 

215 

7,200 

5.000 
41,000 
6 
5 
10 
60 



100 
5,010 



l,.50O 
500 



Saturday, August 3d. 



FLA Piocbe ro Wm Bosworth. . 
Francois Thomas to Marg Malone. 
Geo H Sanderson to \V J Gunn... 
D A MacDonald to Jas P Hill 



Lot 5, blk 15, University Md Survey... 

E Valencia, 110 a 19th. s 50x90 

N Valley, 202 w Church, w 25:8x114... 
Se 22d and Sanchez, a 24, e 100, s 204, e 

21:6, wl:3, n 28, w 125 to com 

Sw 9th av and Clement, w 240x225 .. 

N Green, 167 w Jones, w 30x120 

E Mission, 220 s ISth, s 30x122:6 



W J Gnnn to John J O'Brien 

S H Davis to Mas Sv and Ln Socy 

John Center lo Joseph Kemp 

JosSchnelz to Jno Wieland E 7lb,80 n Brannan,n 25x80 

Jacob Mitchkns to H Krueger W Al,%bama, a38 a 20lh, s 26x100 

Same to Same W Alabama, 104 n 21st, n 26x100 

Jno McGreevey lo W R Sloan !s Filbert, 100 w Larkin, w .37:6x60... 



Chae Brown to Jos Naphtuly 
Chas R Story to Horatio Livermore 



J Napbtaly to Thos Mcloerney 



Lot 9, blk 33, Wes^ End Map I 

Se Charch and 20lh, e 55x114; and sun^ 

dry lots in same part of city 

Lot 9, blk 33, WestEnd Map 1 



$ 6 

10,700 
400 

1,600 

10 

2,500 

1 

500 

Gift 

Gift 

250 

1 

10 
275 



Monday, An^at Slh. 



E Broilerick, «4 • Pine, ■ SJ:OWI:B. . . . 
Lol !». Ilebwca Grove Section Pint 5 of 

Cemetery 

Coinineiieliik' 62:6 a U ntoil 1U7:0 w Fow. 

ell, ».31;6xw 10 

Sc'.'-lh nndKlfg, e 660x228 

Se FolBoni, ri7;li ne 41 li, ne 20x80 

E Lugunn, 1,37:6 s Waller, e to Market, 

aw to Kale, w lo LngnnA, n 137:6 lo 

commencement 

E Howord, 100s 17th, a 25x122:0 

Lois 2, I, 6. or Section 22; lota 1, 3, 5, 7, 

Section 2:1 of iheCeindery 

S Post, llOe Polk, e;i0:6xl20 

Lots, blk 15, Paul Tract nomestem).... 
Nw FranciflCo and Van Neea, u 157:6 x 

1 384:9 

C S de Bernal lo Thos McInerncy.]Lol» 6 to 8, blk 1, S S F lid ond U It A» 
Odd Fell Cem As lo J Scbetdecker Lot ll,Gnardiao Section Plat2orthe 

Cemetery 

S Bush. 112:6 e Hyde, e 2.'ixl37 

Lot 41, blk 227. Gardcnville Homestead. 

W Van Ness. (SO s Gejiry, s 60x1:17:6 

Lot 8, blk 1.39, Ccnlral Park Homestead. 
E Howard, 225 n 18th, n 50x122:6 



D A Mnrdonald lo Jna P Trennnr, 
Odd Fell Ceni Ami lo G Inwoo<l. . , 

A Hclm/enberger toGeo Inwootl. . 

Jas Newman lo J M Cotnerforil . . . . 
Jaa Kelly lo Jullns Kannglecaer . . 
Saml Tlieodore to LamburtKahn. 



United Ld Asn lo Isabella Mason. 
Mae Ceni Assn lo Oriental Lodge. 

Mar)' Fo-'tune to Owen Bnidy .. . . 
Mnrg A (iiilgley lo Cath Magec . . 
M S Poland to Wm F McAllister.. 



John Landers to Helen A Landers 
.Inllan DaigneautoT Mclnerney 

B L Bnindt lo Enielia Brandt 

Patrick Uunican to IMwd R Dall.. 
United Ld Assn lo Chas B Perkins 



».1,050 

450 

4110 

5 

6,1.V) 



C,000 

000 

802 

5,2.W 

150 

1 
2,600 

700 
Gift 

(l.'iO 
Gift 

750 
1,200 



TuFBday, August 6tli. 



Wm Hay Collie to Henry Stewart. 
Henry Stewart to Wm Ilay Collie. 

J B 'i'homas to J B Haggin 

FL Ploche lo.Iohn Finlon 

W L Murpiiy lo Mary Mackey 

Mas Cein Aan lo Jno G Gay 

J G Gay to Kale .Simmons 

Kate Simmons to J U Edwards... 
Geo Lander to Henrietta Krueger. 
M Chadburne to Lizzie H Burnap, 

Wm A Marshall to John Riley .... 

Wm Hollis to Timothy Slack 

Timothy Stack lo Helena Stack... 

Wm Hollis to Delia Whipple 

Amada Loza to Wm Hollia 

Wm Smilh to R U Lloyd 



G D Crocker to Clinton Shane 

H L Hutchinson to Wm Hollis 

Elias Miller to Caroline Miller .. . . 
D W Folger to Eunice H Folger.. 

Nlcbolaa Reynolds to ,1 Verdenal.. 
J M Verdenal to G Caalagnetto . . 
H Levison to J M Verdenal 



Wm Hollis to EmmaK Loring 

Henry Hinkel to Jno J Schoen .. 

Jno J Smith to Oliver Taylor 

V Vackenreuder to L Cunningham 
L Cunningham to James Sbea . 



Se Post and Broderick, e 54x125 

S Post, 54 e Broderick, e 8-3:6x125 

Ne Taylor and Clay, e 200x112:6 

Lot 30, blk 13. Cilv Land Association 
Sw 25th and Polrcro av, s 140x100... 
Lot 11, Section 19 of the Cemetery... 

Same 

Same 

W Alabama, 104 n 21st, n 26x100 

E Leavenworth, 98:9 a O'Farrell. s 25 x 

137:6 

N Clipper, 254:9 e Church, e 25:11x114. 

N Hill, 220 — Valencia, w 30x114 

Same 

S Post, 148:3 w Webster, w 24x137:0... 

ECapp, 205n IStb.n 25x122:6 

Lois 1200, 1201, 1231, and part 1196, Gift 

Map 4 

W Bryant, 140 a 25th, a 47:6x100 

S Sacramento, 1:^7:6 w Laguna, w 68:9, 

s 127:8,V. e 15, s 137:6 to Cal, n 26.5:2Ji 
N California, 137:6 w Larkin, w 2.5xS7. 
E Franklin, 127:8!4 s Washington, n 20x 

137:6 

E Dupont, 20 6 Vallejo, s 20x57:6 

Same 

Same; and n Hinkley, 57:6 e Dupont e20 

x32 

S Sacramento, 157:6 e Buchanan, e 28:9x 

127:8Ji 

W Wehster, 112:6 s McAllister, a 25xM:6 
Lot 4, blk 291, O'Nell and Haley Tract 

Lois 8, 9, 13 of PV lots 242 10 245 

Same 



( 6 

5 

32.0110 
90 
1,'200 
102 
1112 
100 
30O 

100 
J, 600 
4,748 
Gift 
5,600 
5 

600 
3,600 



Gift 

1 

5,000 

60 

2,000 
4,250 
5 
2.250 
3,500 



'Wednesday, August Vth. 



Roht Ash to D A McDonald et al 

J B Rohr to Flora Dnfflcey 

Wm M Hughes to Joseph Rohde. 

Jno O Earllo Jos Sedgley 

Christina Russ to F O \Vcgener . 



Chas Rusa to Same 

F O Wegener to Louisa Wegener. 
Same to Henry Russ et al 



Same to Emeline Gutaknow et al. 
Same to Same 



Same to Henry Rose et al 

Patk Shcehan to Mary Sheehan.. . 
E W Nolting lo Elizth Nolling.... 
Ellen \V Fourgeand to M McCoy.. 

Jas Cannon to Rosanna Robey 

Frank Cunningham lo A Warner. . 

Geo Nicholas to Peter P Cain 

C Collins to Elizth M Chapman.. - 
Jas M Lyons to Ellen Lyons 



E Broderick, 113:6 s Pine, s 24x87:6... 

E 71h, 2.55 nw Brannan. nw 20x80 

Se Post and Devisadero, s 30x112:6... 

Se Mission, 412:'i ne 5th. sw 2.5x80. . . . 

Sw Pine and Montgomery, w 160:5. 
137:6, e 22:11, s 197:6. e 1.37:6. n 275 to 
com; and e cor Folsom and Columbia, 
ne 120x125 

Same 

Und 11-567 same 

Und 8-63 e Folsom and Columbia pi, ne 
120x125 

Und 4-63 same 

Und 22-567 sw Pine and Montgomery, w 
160:5, B 1.37:6, e 22:11, etc 

Und 44-567 same 

Lot 4, blk 3, College Tract 

Lots 1 , 2, 3, blk 42, City Land Assn. . 

Se Folsom, 2-20 ne 3d. ne 18:4x94 

W Nebraska, 800 s Yolo, s 100x25. . . . 

Lot 115, blk 83, Fail-mount Tract 

Lot 2, blk 15, Market St Homestead . 

N Paciflc, 52 w Larkin. w 48x67:8Vi.. 

Se Lyon and Sutter, e 82:6x110 



f 100 

1,436 
2,500 
7,500 



16,000 

15,000 

Gilt 

5 
6 

6 

5 

Gift 

270 

4,100 

900 

1 

500 

10.000 

Gilt 



Wilson White. 



WHITE & KUHL, 



H. G. KuU. 



Merclinudise Brokers, Oraiii Sacks, 'U'ool Bagrs, Gniiuies 
and Jute Goods generally. No. 316 CALIFORNIA STREET, San Fran- 
cis eo, Cal. P. O. Box 2,113. June 15. 

REMOVAL. 

HERRM4.im, THE HATTER, 

—HAS REMOVED TO UIS NEW STOUE — 

330 KEABKT STBEEX. BETWEEN JtUSBC AJfB PINE, 

Where be continues to sell the finest hats at the lowest prices. Aug. 3. 

Heniy B, Williams, Henry P. Blanohard. 

WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 

SnlPPINO AND C0ia.1IISSI09r mebohants. 

No. 213 California st., S. F. [July 27. 



F 



MORRIS SPEYER. 

ire and Mnriiie Iu!*urance Ag^eiit, 307 Callforuis street. 

Dwelling, 507 Post street. Jauuarj^ 1, 1878. Jan. 12. 



SILVER KING NORTH MINING CO., 

Pinal County, Arizona. 
Omce: Room 36, Ho. 330 Piuc St. (Academy Building), S. F. 

CHARLES LE GAY, 

American Commission Merchant, - - 1 Rne Scribe, Pbris. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



A THREE HUNDRED MILE W^AI.K THROUGH JAPAN. 

Comprising a Series of Interesting Sketches of the Country, 
its People, their Manners and Cnstoma 

[Written exclusively for the New3 Letter] 
Hakone, Slay 1st.— Left Sens Gama, accompanied by Arthar Brooke, at 
7 A.M. We arrived eardy at Kanagawa railway station, after a hurried run from 
the bottom of "one hnnared and one" stepe, both of us in a donhle JinruhL'la, 
drawn by three men. We, however, found our haste was auperflnons. as we had 
nearly half an honr to wait before our carriage (a regular break-neck concern) and 
pair was ready. At about 8:15 a.m. we started and went along at a good pace 
(after havinj: changed horees twice) to Fngisawa, where, although it was quite 
early, our valiant driver and fellow (Jap) passenwers insisted on "cbow-chowing." 
We, however, postponed onr mid-day meal till la o'clock, —which consists of a gi- 
gantic sandwich, a piece of which we demolished with relish, being accompanied 
■with no little bnmping and jolting, thereby facilitating our power of digestion. 
After several more changes of horse-flesh, we arrived safely in Odawaria at 3 p.m. 
As usual, upon the arrival of foreigners at this place, a crowd of about une hun- 
dred "kango" men assembled and 3rew lots among themselves (accompanied by 
no little scrambling and squabbling), to determine which of them shou'd carry us 
over the raoanluins. Great was their distust on hearing that the'^Foguis" were 
about to foot it. Leaving this assembly, we immediately set off with our best 
loot forward for Hakone, but, Ifl onr great horror, after tramping a mile or two 
foond it starting in to rain. My friend inamediately stripped nimself to his sin- 
glet and trowsers; the latter he tucked up above his knees, and, wrapping his 
clothes In oil-paper, carried them in a bundle over his shoulder. I foolishly re- 
mained as I started, and consequently got evejijthing drenched^ as before wo had 
gone another " ri" the rain came down in torrents. We stnipgled on boldly up 
precipitous cliff-" and over slippery bowlders in our ascent of the Hakone range, 
and arrived safely at the Kamukura Tca-honse at 7:30 p.m., after AX hours of hard 
and steady walking, or rather climbing. Hakonefiand Lake lie on the top of a 
rano:c of mountains about 4,000 feet above sea level, and is a charming and most 
healthy spot, greatiy frequented during the Summer season. The Lake is five ris 
(about 12>^ miles) in circumference. Hakone Pass was the scene of a battle in 
1867. between the Fokuirawa and Imperial troops, and our Tea-honse still shows 
the effects of same. Several bnlk'ta are to be seen in the walls and doors of the 
room allotted to us, having been occupied by the Shogun's followers. Hakone is 
famous for her Lathemen, and, during the alore-nicntioned engagement, being short 
of shot and ball, they were employed in turning logs of Kiaki and other hard 
woods into common balls. We passed our boy (who was on foot) as we came 
through the village of Totska, distant from Kanagawa about ten miles; he has 
not as yet overtaken us. Distance days travel, 17 ree 20 cho, (A ree is about or 
little over 2X English miles, and 30 cho equal one ree. though in some parts of the 
country they give 32, 36, or even 50 cho to the ree— thus lengthening the rcea to over 
four miles. 

Hara. May 2d. — It was nigh eight o'clock before we arose this morning. After 
demolishing a very fair Japanese breakfast, we rambled around a bit to catch a few 
glimpses of the lovely scenery surrounding this village, but, owing to the clouds 
hanging low, many a charming spot was hidden from our sight. At 10 a.m. we 
bade onr host farewell, and commenced the descent of Hakone range. As usual, 
we were pestered by " Kango " men, and it was not till having made ourselves 
hoarse by denying their services that we got clear of tUem. Having got clear of 
this solitary village, we started off at a brisk i)ace and continued the same till we 
overtook a Jap. traveler, of muscular development. Then, deieamining to fjive 
him an idea of tlic walking power of "Foguis," we quickened our step. Ueat- 
tempted to support the dignity of "Dai Klpon," and also increased bis speed, and 
it was not until we had got near the foot of the mountains that he gave in and 
owned to the superior walking power of a pair of Australitins. The road from 
Hakone to Meshima is very bad— both steep, rough and slippery— being built of 
lye-stone bowlders driven into the earth. At about noon we entered the large 
and prosperous town of Meahima. and, alYer exploring a few of its numerous larL'C 
shops, we visited the very famous and popular Shinto Temple of "Meshima Dai- 
Sha," which stands in the very heart of the town. Entering by the huge granite 
arch, or '-Forii," we soon find ourselves in beaut'ful grounds, Inclosed bymnssive 
stone railing. The first things that meet the eye are a number of lovely cherry, 
trees, in full blossom. Next comes a large pond, walled entirely by stone, arid 
crossed by a fine bridge built of the same material. The pond teems with gold-fish 
of great age and size, some of over 12-lb8. weight. Upon throwing into the water 
a few handfulls of "mamcys" (peas), hundreds of these ravenous creatures rose to 
the surface. The Temple is a fine piece of monastic architecture, and most elabor- 
ately adorned with carvinesofthefincst workmanship. The tapestries hungarouud 
bear the Crysanthemam (Imperia! crest) and the mountings, the "Kiri;" whilst the 
roof is alive with pigeons, and the steps are overrun with roosters; the latter, not- 
withstanding the sanctity of the place and the religions motive which had caused 
various donors to present them to theTemple. were indulging with the greatest en- 
ergy in "cock-fighting," by which we were much amused— free of charge. The 
grounds, as usual, were filled with numerous pilgrims and religiously-inclined trav- 
elers (among which ourselves). Saying good-bye to this sacrilegious spot, we 
tramped on quietly through Meshima, and an hour's walking brou-ht us to the 
email town of Numadzu, close to the sea-coast. Upon stepping into a T. house, 
that had been recommended to us, we asked for rooms, but were informed they 
were all taken. However, on presenting a "Try-pida" (a card or ticket of recom- 
mendation generally given out by the T house at which yon remain over night), 
they made excuses, and soon showed us in to a first-class room, and supplied us with 
a square meal. After which we rested awhile, and at 3 p.m., just as we wore on the 
point of leaving, our faithnil boy arrived, havmg traveled from Odawarra thit day, 
and was consequently very much fatigued. We therefore concluded we would go 
no farther than the nest small town— distance IJ^ ree, over a first-class and level 
road. After an hour and a hairs slow walking we reached, without any events of 
importance, the quiet village of Hara, which is principally composed of farm- 
houses, with a small shop here and there. Our Tea-house is the " Hongin" of the 
place (a name given to Tea-houses at which the Mikado. Shoguns, Daimios, and 
other great personages, during their travels, stop at, and who gnintwl the Tea- 
house keepers an annual allowance, thereby having the power, upon their arrival, 
of claiming the house to themselves, and Inrnlug out all other travelers if they 
thought fit. A large town frequcully had several Hongins, and most of the Dui- 
mios and Tycoons had one m every city, though in the nrescnt day there are but 
few Hongins in existence. They are looked upon as a dream of the pa=t, in the 
time of the Samaumis greatness. Our"chuya," though small, is clean and neat 
with its attendants most obliging, and upholds with credit the name of WataLahe! 
The usual evening meal dispatched, we were visited by an "ama" (shampouer). 
whose services we readily engaged, being somewhat stiff after onr descent of Ha- 
kone mountains. This finished, we speedily retired to rest. Althou"h the day had 
been tolerably fine, the evening brought with its dusky shades clouds of a still 
deeper color, threatening to ram every minute. It was not, however, till the early 
hours of the morning thut It came down, and then with such force as to somewhat 
disturb our rest. Distance from Ilukonc to Harn, 6 ri 23 cho, about ITjrf miles 
[To be Continued] 



The new ateam dispatch vessel, Iris, of 4,000 tons and 7,000 horse- 
power (nominal), that has just been added to the British Navy, has been 
tried, and proved to have a speed of twenty-one miles an hour. She is 
lightly armed with 64-pounder8, and, having the speed of anything afloat, 
is exjiected, in the event of a war, to run away from anything too heavy 
for her, out-maneuver any ordinary-armed vessel, and play hob with the 
enemy's mercantile marine. 

SterUng Silverware— A large assortment of elegant designs at An- 
derson & Kaudolph's, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. 



THE COVENTRY MACHINISTS' CO., 

Coventry. England. 
Manufacturers of the Celebrated Mod- 
ern Bicycles: 
" Coventry Racer," 

**Oeutlemau''s Boaflster,'' 

aufi *'Clnb Bicycle,'' 
Justly Renowned for tbeir Durability, Elegance, 
Lightness and Speed. 

A. KONEKE & CO., Agents, 
July 6. 625 Front street 



WAKELEE'S AUREOLINE 

Produces tlie Beautiful Golden Hair so much Admired. 
STTPJEBZOIt TO THE IXPOItTED ASTICI.E 

— BY REASON OF ITS — 

FBESHNS)SS AJSD CASE USED IN ITS FSOBtrCTION. 




PBIVE, IiARGE BOTTI.es, $3. 



Manufactured by H. P. WAKELEE & CO., 
Montgomery and. Hush streets^ S. E. 



DruggistSf corner 

[July 20. 



NOTICE. 

Presidents, Secretaries and Managing Directors of Mining 
Companies. 

Please prepare yoar reports for the '* Pacific Coast Annual 
Mining' Review and Stock Ledirer," the necessary Blanks for whieh have been 
left at the different Mining- Offices, 

It is respectfully sugg^ested that the Report should embrace : A brief history of 
the mine and a description of the company's works, machuiery, etc. ; a synopsis of 
the Superintendent's annual report ; the Treaaurer's exhibit, etc. 

Stockholders and the stock-dealing public generally desire a statement of the 
amount of money received and disbursed, and fur what purposes. They also desire 
to know what work has been done, and what is in progress. Give the people the 
facts in relation to the mines. Remember that in addition to the immense edition 
that will be printed for home circulation, thousands will go into the bands of cap- 
it;iUsts in the Eastern, Western and Southern States, and thousands into Euro[)e 
and Asia. 

Let every mine on the coast be repreaented in the Directory department, and let 
every mine possessing merit and fair prospects be well written up in the Editorial 
department. 

If there is a Secretary in the city that has not received blanks for his Reports, let 
him send his name at once to R. S. LAWRENCE, Editor, Room 75, Russ House. 
Correspoudeuce. 

Gentlemen in the interior to whom we have addressed Circulars will please send in 
their Reports at the earliest practicable moment. Send us all the facts in relation to 
the District and each particular mine. The influence of the publication will be 
world-wide. 

The work will be published by the old and reliable house of Francis & Valentine, 
517 Clay street. July 20. 

F. 0. Snow. SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. W. B. May. 

SNOW A MAT, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTtTRERS OF 
Pictures, Fi'ames, Slolflings, aud Artists' Materials. 

21 Kearny St. near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 

IN CONSEQUENCE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS 

Of I.EA A I*£RKINS' KAVCr.. which are CHl<-itl»to:l to de- 
ceive the public, r.EA ANI> PERBXNS have adopted A NEW LABEL 
BEARING THEIR SIGNATURE, LEA & PEKRINS, which is placed on every bottle 
of WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE, and without which none isgenuine. 

Ask for LEA & PERRINS' Sauce, and see name on \sTapper, label, bottle and stop- 
per. >\'hoIesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & Blackwell, 
London, etc, etc., and by jprocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 
Dec. 1. MESSRS. CROSS & CO.. San Francisco. 

^ PRINTS -^ 
637 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

BELOW MONTGOMERY. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CAL. 

Attendance, ilaily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. j. p. McCURRIE, Secretary, 
O'J t. 23. ^ 730 Montgomery street. 

HARRY N. MORSELS 

(Ex-Slieriff of Alameda Connty) 

Detective and Collection Af^eucy, Safe Deposit Balldin^, 
32s Montg-omery street, Room 12, Third Floor. Take the Elevator. Oakland 
Office, in the Olascock Building', corner Washington and Seventh streets, up stairs. 
A. B. LAWSON, Manager for Oakland. This Agency is prepared to do all LEGITI- 
MATE detective business intrusted to its care. It does not operate for contingent 
rewards, aud is independent of government or municipal control. July 27. 

NOBLE AND GALLAGHER. 

Importers and Dealer.^ in Painters' Materials, House, Si^n 
and Fresco Painters, Plain and Decorative Paper-Hangers and Glaziers, No. 438 
Jackson street, between Montgomery and Sansome, San Francisco. Ceilings and 
Walls Kalsomined and Colored. Jobbing promptly attended to. May X3. 

HARTSHORN & M'PHUN, 

Manufactnrers or all kliKis or M'ludoiv Sliades, Dealers In 
Carpets, Oil Cloths, Corakea, Window Lace, etc., 112 Fourth street, near Mis- 
sion. Factory : Corner Bluxom e and F ifth streets. April 13. 



BISTJCE, 



TABER, HARKER & CO., 

Successors to Phlliips, Taber •& Co., Importers and Wholesale Gro- 
cers, 108 and 110 California street, below Front, San Francisco. April 16. 



NOTICE. 

For the Tery best photosraphs so to Bradley A Ralofson's, 
in an Elevator, 429 Montffomery street. Oct. 29. 



Aug 10, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVEUTISER. 



17 



CRADLE, ALTAR. AND TOMB. 



CRADLB. 

Dkovh— In ihti cltjr, Julv 27th. tti the wife u( T, llTO«-n, a dauKhlcr. 
Uatm — III llraltlslmtv. July ^1> to t'>v ^'i'^' *■' J- ^ lUtM, n (tiiu};tit«r. 
CuKMU. -In this cily. July liOth. to Ihc wife of W. C. (.'ornell, n Mm. 
l>iNkitii-lii L<v Aii^'K'K'ei, Ju1,v ^th. 111 the wlfoof A. II. Dviikcr, a (Unffht«r. 
l>AVi»- 111 thi-t citv. Aii^-Uft 3*1. to till! wife of Nathan Itavln. ii ilatiifhU'r. 
IU.\kK— In tM^ t'Uv. AiijifiiHt fitli. t*i (liu wife of JmIhi C. llnnkc. u ilnuiflitt^ir. 
ilAKn)iti> In tliU city, Auini'-t iil. to liu» wife <-f \V. U. W. Hiirfonl. a son. 
&IAM1KL9 -III Una city, Aii(;iL«t 4th, to the uifi- of ChrU ManL'vId, a daU(;litur. 
O'Neill- In this cily. July 'Zt\. to the wrifo of Tlioina* O'NuilF, a son. 
KRVitiK — In thi« city, Aii^'UHt ttth.to the wifu of \V. Kenniu, a (laughtvr, 
SiiA»T>liK-ln thiit i-ity. Aiik'tist Ift. to the wifu of C. II. Shaftiior, a iluughtor. 
Smith -At Mm, July 'AHU, U- tho wife tit Ca|)Lulii A. Smith, a daut;hu-r. 
ScoTT-ln San Jow:. July iSth, to the wife of H, K. Hcoil, a son. 
SciioKX- III thitt cily, Aiiji'tisl *!. t«' thy wifu i)f P. SchiHMi, a son, 
WKttii~ln bui Pablo, August 5th, to the wife of {"aul Wuylic, a daut,'hter. 

AI.TAR. 

BATnt-Suna— In San Rafael, July 20th, Manha) K. Bates to Unie Scars. 
KRtM.Kft~Rixb — In tliis t-ity, Au^et Ist, Edwin S. Unmltfi to Ida lt«n. 
l>Auiit-Ki'LEV-ln this city, AULtiBt IpI, Charles A. Harby to liva IJ, Epley. 
Hi sNRY-KKLLr — In thla city, tluly 2ftth. Simon A. Ilusacy to Annie E. KuIIy. 
Joanhos-Olivrr— In this city. Auyiist fith, Major Jan. C. Johnson to Ellen Oliver. 
MlLLRR-KicuT - h: this eity, Au>rur*i 4th, Wni, C Miller to Eniolia Fiulit. 
SlKRo-l'orK— In this vily, Anj.'Uht iMh, Ucorye K. Mem to Pauline Pope. 
RAi'm'ot-MtFADDts — 111 this eily, Aiinusl 4th. Antonio Ilucoeot to Ellen McFaddcn. 
HAi>ii'H-ST\)DiitiK — In IhtB city, Auj,'\ist 3d, Ludwip Radius to Eliza St^Klieck. 
SwisRKORi»-JoSR«— In this city. Au^'Ust .Id, NewMii Swlncford to Kitty Jones, 
Thkali^Rookiw— In this city, July 21Hh, H. II. llirail to Mrs. Mabel lUig^rs. 
Wkkka-Uaddock— In Elk Grove, August 4th, G. W. Weeks to Mary Muddoek. 

TOMB. 

Blair— In tbia rity, Au^nist 5th, Thomas M. Blair, aged 45 years and 5 months. 

Bhaxpkxsteis — Ir. this city. AuLmst 4th, Gertrude Branden stein, aged 4 years. 

Bkavkr -In thid rity, August 7tri. Annie Beaver, aged 35 years. 

Callhanr — In this city, August 4th, John Cullhane. aged 35 years. 

Clark— In this city, August i»th, Mrs. B. Clark, aged 40 years. 

Gatks— In this city, August 3d, H. S. Gates, M.O.. aged 68 years. 

Ladd— In this city, Aui^i.st 5th, Samuel G. Ladd. aged 55 years. 

Lark — In this city. August 6th, Mary A- Lark, aged 51 years. 

McGkk — In this city, August 4th. John McGee, age<i 48 years. 

MoLLOY— In this city, August 7th, Paul MoUoy, aged 77 years. 

Mi'RriiY— In this city, August 6th, Annie L. Murphy, aged 23 years. 

MfCLKH,AV— In Suisiin, Cal., August 7th, Jaa. McClellan, aged 29 years. 

UrooLF-s- -In Stv>ekton. August 4th, Charlotte \V. Rugglcs, aged 17 years. 

Rice— Near Santa Barliara, August 1st, Katie Uice. 

Uaxdall — In this city. August 3d, James Kandall, aged 27 years. 

Smith — In this city, August ttth. Charlotte Regina Smith, aged 53 years. 

Wariso— In this city, Aui^ist ;Jd, Mary Waring, aged 22 years. 

AUGUSTINE TO AUGUSTA. 

Although the weather has been so changeable, the Exhibition con- 
tinues to attract thousands diiily. Notwithstanding the multitude of 
wonrlerful things to be visited and admired, I do my beat not to let any 
novelty in dress escape my view. I have noticed many elegantly -dressed 
ladies this week in light summer costumes; the three principal colors are 
pink, white, and blue; the most favored color is perhaps pink. Bonnets 
and hats are chiefly of straw; for instance, Italian straw, with long 
feathers, bunches of vari-eolored roses, and black velvet strings, or some- 
tiraca without strings, are much seen. The shapes are very varied: the 
Montpenaier, with oroad, wing-looking sides; the square-shaped Bour- 
bnnnaisi (Bourbonaise) with high crown; the Directoire style, and the 
Gainsborough, or as it is now nailed the Devonshire, are all fashionable. 
This last is ;tn extremely ladylike hat, with the broad rim lined with 
satin or velvet, and with flowing long feathers. It is worn a little aide- 
ways upon the head, and is very becoming for garden parties, but is hardly 
a carriage bonnet. Many elegant bonnets are entirely of flowers sewn 
upon an invisible stiff net. Scottish i)Iaid costumes are very much worn, 
also Indian foulard, Indian muslin, and cashmere. The dresses that are 
made with bodices have plait.^ in the middle of the back, plaited basques, 
and waistband. The short round skirt is becoming quite fashionable, yet 
the Princess shape is still and will long continue to be much worn. 

Linen dresses are much seen. One of the prettiest I have noticed was 
of blue, trimmed with white lace, embroidered blue and yellow, ami with 
bands of narrow grenat red velvet; the bodice was plaited at the back 
with a satin waistband, and duchesse-shaped open sleeves trimmed with 
same lace. 

Another pretty linen dress had a pattern of little stripes, called " mille 
raies," pink and white. The skirt was short and round, the bodice 
plaited a la Vierge, with little flounces embroidered on the edges, and a 
long flowing waistband falling on the side, of pink and white, the whole 
surmounted by a Cabriolet hat, trimmed with very narrow black velvet 
ribbim and red cherries. This Cabriolet hat is much like the Bergere, the 
rims being flat near the ears, and kept so by the strings, which tie under 
the chin. 

In answer to your question about the keeping of eggs. I have consulted 
some of the cleverest farmers' wives in our villlage, and from all I hear I 
find the following the best method : Put the fresh eggs into a solution of 
gum and water, or paint them entirely with gum; then lay them in a box 
of powdered wood charcoal. The gum closes the pores of the shell, and 
keeps the eggs from the air, and the wood charcoal is a capital conserva- 
tive ; before using them in Autumn they should be well washed and 
brushed. Another way is to boil them about one minute and a half, the 
day they are laid ; then the date is marked on them with a pencil, and 
they are placed in a dry, cool place. In this way they will keep without 
change for several months; when they are required for use they must be 
placed, in cold water and boiled. The way to have quite fresh eggs all 
through the Winter is to put a dozen hens in a warm place — for instance, 
a cowshed; feed them with buckwheat, and give them every morning stiff 
broth, composed of hempseed, a little barley bran, and a sixth part of 
fine powdered brick -dust, which is first run through a sieve. They will lay 
famously every day, but by the Spring they are used up for laying pur- 
poses, and should be well fattened and roasted. — Augustine, in Trvtli. 



The Directors of the London and Westminster Bank have resolved to 
declare a dividend of 7 per cent, on the paid-up capital of £2,000,000 for 
the half-year ended June 30, 1878. The rest or surplus fund will then 
amount to about £914,000, as against £854,722 in December last. 



STOCK BROKERS. 



J. E. S, Latham. LATHAM tk KINO, Homer S. King, 

Suvo«iim>ni t« Jniuea II. I.n(linin A Co., No. 313 I'liio iitreet, 
block and .Moiiuy Urokun. Stocks boujfht and carried on inurKlriH. July 13. 

Danibl Z. YuifT.] [J. W. ItrtKCKtMiiuuK, Members. F. Board. 

BRECKINRIDGE & YOST, 

Stoek Brukvrn, :I01 Moiittfonivry St. [March 10. 



SiiBRWooD Callaouan'.] [Jkrkiiiaii LvKcn. 

CALLAGHAN, LYNCH & CO., 

stock Brokers, No. 608 California Street, San Francisco. 

[A|.ril 27.1 



Qao. 0. UlCKOx. 



GEORGE C. HICKOX & CO., 



E. C. MoFarlanb. 



ttommlsslon Stuck BrokcrM (Niin Frnuclsco Stock Ex- 
/ change, No, 230 Montgomery street, Sun Traiiciaco. 



J. M. Walkkr. 



Jknxin'qs S. Cox. 



May 4. 
ALKXANUEa Al'STIN. 



s 



J. M. WALKER & CO., 



to€k BrokcrM, Northwest comer Slout^oiiicry ami Pino 

streets, San Fraiieisco. March UU. 



B, Boswell. 



s 



S. B. BOSWELL & CO., 



D, 0. Bates. 



tock Brokers. No. 318 Cnliforula street, Sau Francisco, 

California Marcli 30. 

THOMAS BOYSON, M. D., 

(TTniversity of Copenhagren, Denzoark), 

Physician anil Snrgrcon. Oflice and Resilience, 113 Kearny 
street. Office Hours, 11 a.m. to 1 F.M., and 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, 11 to I only. 
Telephone in the office. July 13. 

DR. HALPRUNER, 

STTRGEON CHIROPODIST, 

(^nres Corns, BunlouM, Ingrowing Nails, etc. No pay re- 
y quired until cured. And without pain or lamciicsu. Examination and Con- 
Euitatiou Free. Mrs. II. will assist treating ladies. Offccb Ilomis: From 1 p.m. 
6 P.M., and 7 to 9 p.m. ; Sunday, 11 to 1 p.m. ST JAMES HoUSK, 

March 2S. 900 Market street, comer Ellis and Stockton, 



to 



CHARLES 

Office and Besideace : 



E. HOLBROOK, M. 0., 

St. James House, 9J6 Market Street. 

[Mareh23.1 



DR. D. A. KILLER'S 

omeopatliic Free Dispensary to the Poor, No. 13 Bagley 

Place, off O'Farrcll street, next Hammam Baths. Feb. lU. 



H 



O 



TO DENTISTS PHYSICIANS AND ARTISTS. 

ffices to Rent.— Tliose desirable front rooms on Grst floor 

NUCLEUS HJUSE, facing Market, Third and Kearny Btreetd. Apply to 
June S. MRS. E. R. WORTH. 

DR. O'TQOLE'S OFFICES 

Are moved from OOG Market street to California Savings 
Bank Building, corner Market, Powell and Eddy streets. Entrance on Eddy 
s treet. July 13. 

Geo Schultz. SCHULTZ & VON BARGEN. H- Von Bargen. 

Importers and Dealers In Wines, BniBiilies, Bourbon Whis- 
kies, and all kinds of Foreign and Domestic Liquors, southeast corner California 
and Front streets, San. Francisco. April 13. 

J. C. MERRILL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants, Asrents for the Sand- 
wich Islands Packet Lines, iO-k California street, S. F. April 13. 

L-H^irewtoii. NEWTON BROTHERS & Coi^ MTNe^on. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, 204 and '-iOfj California street, San Francisco, Cal. May 25. 



G-eo. Howes. 



GEO. HOWES & CO., 



Jabez Howes. 



San Francisco, Californin, Shipj 
chants, and agents of Sutton " " ■ ■■ 
New York and Philadelphia. 

D. F. HuTcniNQS. 



ipiiig anil Commission Mer- 

Dispateh 



Line of Clipper Ships from 
May 11. 



PHOENIX 



M. DUNKB. 

OIL WORKS. 



Established ISSO.—Hutchings A Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating: Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

Newtos Booth, C. T. VVubelkr, Sacramento. | J. T. Glovpr, W W. Dodge, S. F 

W. W. DODGE & CO. 

holesale Oroccrs, corner Front and Clay streets, San 

Francisco. April 1. 



w 



ASHTON'S LIVERPOOL SALT. 

This celebrateil brand of Salt has been in constant nse for 
more than half a century in the Eastern States, where fur dairy purposes it 
commands double the i>ricc of any other brand of Liverpool Salt. »'he undersijpied 
Bre sole agents here, and offeritto the trade. WILLIAMS, BLANCHARD & CO., 
Jan. 5. 21S California street. 

COKE CHEAPEST FUEL. 

Reduction in Price : Wholesale Price, 50 cents per barrel ; 
Retail Price. 00 cents per barrel, at the works of the SAN FRANCISCO GAS- 
LIGHT COMPANY, Howard and First streets, and foot of Second st. Jan. 12. 



H. S. Crocker. 



H. S. CROCKER & CO., 



John D. Yost. 



Stationers and Printers, No.^s 401-40S Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Mu.rcli 9. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LK'FTER AND 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



EXCURSION TO SANTA CRUZ. 

Have yon ever been to Santa Cmz? If not, (jo, by all means; 
and if you are not afraid of an hour's pitching and rolling, call on Dave 
Jackson, and buy a ticket for the Ancott. It is a pleasant, very pleasant 
way of spending your Sunday. Instead of lying a-bed till ten or eleven, 
then a late breakfast, and a day's loafing at the Club, there is fresh air, a 
bracing swim in the surf, and an increased appetite, for your Sabbath. 

On Saturday, we sterted, a jolly party of ten, bound for fun, etc. The 
boat was crowded, more so than usual. A military company, with guests, 
were on board — going out camping, so-called. Sleeping under tents, but 
lounging, eating, etc., at the hotel The little (Jerman band, with old 
Kidd and bis baby clarionet, is missed, and its substitute, the big Hano- 
veran band, is voted a nuisance. Too much big drum, Herr Ritzan. Who 
is on board ? Well, the usual lot. Husbands, sweethearts and parents, 
brokers' clerks, counter jumpers, Bohemians on a lark, and a fevv country 
cousins, returning from a week's dissipation in the big city. Weather mild 
and beautiful. Now, we are on the bar. She pitches. Who is the first 
victim? There, there — poor old lady ! Take good care of her, young man. 
Different people assume different positions, more or less graceful, over 
taffraiL We make fun of the unfortunates. Human nature, all over. 
Catch a glimpse of the sand mines — band plays " Baby Mine." ^Vhere is 
our friend, the silvery tenor? No, he will not favor us to-day — crowd too 
mixed. Thank God ! And so the time wears on. Dinner gong ! A rush 
for first table. Soup, steaks and pie vanish. Second table ; more ditto, 
ditto. Pigeon Point; an hour more. Santa Cruz light ift distance. Every- 
body prims up and grabs satchel an hour too soon. Wharf in sight, with 
great torchlight procession. Thirty minutes of backing and hauling. 
Landed at last. Triumphant reception by three soldiers in gray, and two 
hundred boys with torches. We walk through the open ranks, politely 
■ acknowledging the graceful compliment. Boys cheer ! Some one uses the 
word "guy," and is immediately compelled to carry all the baggage. 
Hurry up, fellows, or there will be no more rooms. " Free coach for the 
Pacific Ocean House !" That is what the gang wants, and the stage is cap 
tured. " Any rooms, mine host Hoadley ?" " Yes, if you will bunk three 
in a bed." Well, then, let us be military. A laouerre, commea lat/uei^re. 
Now for dinner. Down to the Rotisserie. " A good dinner, if you please, 
and hang the expense. A couple of Roederer." 

Sunday, lOJ a. m. — Ho, for the beach! Here wp are, and here they 
are. They come from Taylor's, from Hoadley's and from Wilkins'^on 
foot, on horseback and in buggies and in cariyalls, pretty women and 
brave men. There is Dan. with the Pope crowd— a perfect bevy of youth 
and beauty. Everybody on the beach, and nobody in the water as yet. 
Everybody waiting for everybody else. Who will lead the van ? Where 
is the man? Ah. there he goes? Hurrah for number one! The surf is 
broken and the rush begins. In suits of all styles aud hues— blue, red, 
yellow, black and white. You pay your money and take your choice. A 
pretty sight indeed! The beach covered with groups, picturesque and 
otherwise, in white dresses, gay ribbons and colored parasols. In the 
water the merry throng, laughing and shouting. In the distance, on the 
raft, a group of good swimmers, artistically brought together as regards 
color of suits. And then, as a grand background to this kaleidoscope, the 
cold, grey horizon and the calm, placid Pacific. But the water is cold 
this morning, so don't stay in too long, my friends. Back to town, lunch 
and siesta. Do you want to ride, you can go to the Big Trees, but take 
the advice of one who has been there over and over again and postpone 
the trip. There is an excursion to-day — too many people by far. Wait 
imtil some quiet week-day, and then take a buggy and go up there with 
your affinity. You won't be disturbed, and the spot is a capital one for 
romance aud sentiment. 

Sh p. M. — Let us go back to the beach. The ladies prefer the afternoon 
hour now for their dip. The water is warmer. Now for a long swim. 
A schooner at anchor in the bay is reached by a party of four, one in 
red, one in blue, and two in black. Good swimmers all! 

There is a lady on the raft. She dives, by Jove, and gracefullv, too ! 
A real Venus Aphrodite. Once more does the tide of clean and braced 
humanity flow towards town. Another good dinner, and we are ready 
for the return trip. The wharf is black with people; the whole town 
turns out ; it looks like the departure of an Atlantic steamer ; the warmth 
of the adieux and quantity of fond messages sent to absent friends sug- 
gests a trip of long duration. More backing and hauling before we are 
ofi^. There is not in all U.-S.-dom another wharf that receives the same 
amount of considerate treatment. The way the steamer approaches and 
leaves it is like the kind and careful attentions due feeble old age. Off at 
last. No band to-night ; so, singers — heaven save the mark — to work ; 
" Home again " — too high ! try again. Do you call that music? Well, 
we must stand it ! Beautiful moonlight ! — sea perfectly calm. Lots of 
flirtations ; sweet things sound much more so, when said with an accom- 
paniment of Roft moonlight or sweet strains of music. " How can I leave 
Tbee, Mary Eileen?" Very good amateur singing by Bohemian crowd- 
tremendous applause ! The swell tenor goes for the high C, but as we are 
just passing Pigeon Point the operation ^ reversed, and the brave but 
misguided man succombs. Eleven o'clock P. M. — to bed; a few hours' 
rest. The early dawn greets our entrance into the grand Golden Gate. 
Too early to land. Captain Debney says, so we take [a trip around the 
bay, up Ut Saucelito, through Racoon Straits ; a glorious sunrise — a novel 
spectacle for most of us. A broad band of red lines the crest of old Di- 
j.blo ; it turns to purple, and slowly into a halo of golden brilliancy. 
Transfer Company— "Check your baggage?" Oh, pshaw! Good-bye 
romance — we land, so ta-ta ! 

[We have another interestioer letter concerning an excursion to Sant-v Cruz, highly 
coniplimentarj' to the steamer Ancon and her officers, which we would like to give 
in this issue, but which we are obliged to omit by reason of the pressure on our 
columns.] ^ 

St John's PreBbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor.— The Rev. Dr. Scott, pastor, will preach on Sunday at 11 a. m. 
and 7A p. m. Public conlially invited. Prayer and praise service at 6^ 
p. M. Sunday School and Bible Classes, 9^ A. m. 

Joe Miller, sitting in his window at the Sun Tavern, in Clare street, 
while a fish- woman was passing by, crying, "Buy my soles, buy my 
maids." "All! you wicked old creature," said Joe, "are you not con- 
tented to sell yoiu- own soul, but you must sell your maid's too?" 

2:13^ is the Rams kind of trotting. 



HIGHEST STOCK QTTOTATIONS FOR WEEK ENDING AUG. 9. 1878- 

CoMpiLBD BY George C. Hickoi & Co., 230 MoNToosiERr St. 



Name of Mike. 



Argenta 

Andes 

Alpha 

•Alta 

*Alps , 

Bullion 

•Belcher , 

Best & Belcher. . 

Benton 

Bodie , 

Cons Imperial. . 
♦Crown Point... 

Chollar 

California 

Con. Virginia... 

Caledonia 

Confidence 

De Frees 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer... . 
Gould & Currj- . 

Gila 

♦Grand Prize 

Hale&Norcross 

Julia , 

♦Justice 

Jackson 

Kentuck 

•Leopard 

Lady Waah'n . . . 

Leviathan 

Leeds , 

Mexican 

"Modoc 

Manhattan 

Northern Belle . 

•Ophir 

Overman , 

Rajiuond & Ely 

Rye Patch , 

'Savatre 

Sierra" Nevada .. 

•Silver HUI 

Seg Belcher 

Solid Silver 

Succor , 

Silver King, Ar'i 
Silv. King South 

•Tip-Top 

Union Con 

♦Utah 

Yellow Jacket... 



103 



16i 



lOi 



16i 



12i 



179 



151 



Friday 

A.M. P.M. 



19i 



23^ 



2d4 



27i 



u 

84 



3 

44 



23i 



1 
23 



Assessments are now due on the Stocks above marked thus • 



The Shah wishes to have the telephone " laid on" from the Imperial 
Opera at St. Petersburs to his palace at Teheran, so that he can " hear 
the stars without paying over £.300 a night for them. " 

wny 13 it that the yonng man who attends a picnic wearing white 
duck pants, always says his physician won't allow him to eat blackberry 
pie? 



SAN FRANCISCq^NEWS I,ETT£R. 
SUBSCBIPTIOirS: 

Vnited states $5 a Year. | Foreign $6 n Tear. 

«B-Postage Prepaid.-®* 

The following^ firms are authorized to receive subscriptions and advertisements for 
the San Francisco jVews Letter; 

IMSDOS, Eso.— W H. Smith & Sons. 186 Strand, W.C. ; George Street &■ Co.. 30 
ComhiU. E.C. ; F. Alfpir, 8 Clement's Lane. E.C. ; American Exchange and Reading 
Rooms, 449 Charing Cross. W.C; ; Deiizy, Davies & Co., 1 Cecil street. Strand, W.C: 
Wm. Wilson, 6 Talbot Court, Eastcheap, E.C. 

Paris. France. ~ Charles Legay, 1 Rue Scribe; "Anglo-American Bank," 19 Boule- 
vard de la Madelaine. 

New York.— S. M. Pettengill S Co., 37 Park Row; Geoise P. KoweU & Co., 10 Spruce 
street ; A Brentano, 37 Union Square. 

Boston, Mass.— S. M. Pettengill & Co., 10 State street 

St. Lons, Mo.— Kowcll & Chesman, corner Third and Chestnut. 

CnicAGO, III.— Cook, Coburn & Co. 

PuiLADELPHLi. Pe.vj.— S. M. PetteugUl & Co., 701 Chestnut street. 

Victoria, E. C— T. N. Hibben & Co. 

Sacrame-vto.- A. S. Hopkins. [February 23. 

Stewart Menzies. 

MENZIES & BINGHAM, 

stevedores, 

514 BATTERY STBEET, SAN FKANCISCO, 



Henry Binghain, 



[Aug. 3. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Home Dlatnal Insurance CompAuy will pny its regpniar 
monthly dividend of One Dollar (§1) per ahare upon its capital stock, on August 
10th, 1S78. CHARLES R. STORY, Secretarj-. 

Aug. 10. 40G California street. 

ST. MARY'S COLLEGE. 

Stadlesivil] l>e Besamed at tbis lustitation, Friday, Angr. 2d. 

[August 3.] 

E. E. Doyle. DOYLE & WILSON, Ohas. Wilson. 

Ship and Freight Brokers, No. 18 Calirornln street, San 
Francisco, California. . Aug 3. 



S' 



REVOLVER FREE. 

even-shot BeTolvern-itli Box Cartridgres. Address, 

' August 3.1 J. EON^Tsf & SON, 130 and 138 Wood St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



19 



>BIZ. 



It la with anfolgned satlafactloQ th«t we bare now to record the 
fuifiliut<nt of our luDK-rrfdictvcl iihniplievy—thtit jdhI «» tuton as we he^'an 
to exiKtrt fr»*trly of our laive ana aliuiitUnt cmptt that bubine^a would re- 
vive, and that c«>mtuerciiil and tinnnL-inl affain* Kenerally would resume 
ttieir wonted lift* nntl activity; and now all will admit that that ^'nod tiiue 
hort arrived. Stirling Hill" are becumtni; more |>K'iitifully drawn ajjaiimt 
flhi|>mtMil4 of Wheat and Flour to the Unite<l Kiii^'dom. Money was 
never m<ire plentiful tlian at present. Interest rates are lower than ever 
before on the Pa*'ific- SIojw. There is no scarcity ()f coin and credit 
with whiih to move tlie crops. Wheat and Barley are ariivin^ freely 
from the interior of the State. Ship^ from all quarten* of the glolie are 
convinf; here in considerable numbon*. S|K>t freijfhta to the United Kintf- 
dom and eNewhere are very low, while a K'^od many ships arrivintj in our 
harbor come (h^Aoetuevl of borne grain charters at 55@6(^, rates far above 
thoeie now obtainable. 

Exports of Breadstuff to the United Kinf^dom are going forward ra- 
pidly. In the month of July there were only U clearances, but in the 
first seven days of An^iist 11 vessels were cleared. From July lat to 
August 7th, 1878, the figures stood thus: 

CUs. Wheat Value. 

20 veasseb, with 70".;«2 $1,194,250 

4 vesHelrt. same time, 1877 155.329 351.483 

25 vessels, si^me time, 1876 763,771 1,303,457 

We think that during the mirrent month of August we will dispatch not 
less than .'Jo ships to the United Kingdom, grain-ladened. At this date, 
we have in port 51 vessels on the berth to loud grain, having a registered 
tonnage of 70.8153 tons; while the disenya^ed fleet of deep water vessels 
numbers 66. of a registered tonnage of 8U,517 tons. In addition to the 
large fleet of ships in port, there is not less than 225,000 registered ton- 
nage in sight, headed this way for Fall and Winter loading. The result 
of this large influx of tonnage to the Pacific Slope is indicative of low 
freights for the balance of the year, and that means good prices for wheat 
for the growers of California and Oregon. At this writing, the nominal 
freight rate to the United Kingdom is 45 shillings, say £2 5s. At this a 
few charters might be closed, while only 40 shillings (£2) are offered for 
September loading. The present price of good shipping wheat is .§1.65 to 
SI. 70, with an occasional sale at SI. 72^. Millers pay Si. 70 to SI. 75 per ctl. 
for good to choice lots, while common, inferior, shrunken, foul and pinched 
wheat is slow of .sale at S1.35 to S1.50 per ctl. Receipts large, and trade 
very active. 

Real estate is more inquired for than for months past, and many 
houses long tenantless by absentees, pleasure seekers at watering places, 
etc., are now occupied, parties returning to the city for business. 

The mining share market is now all aglow. California, Pine and 
Leiilesdorff streets, where stock-jobbers and curb-stone brokers do most 
resort and congregate, are now filled and crowded with stock-brokers and 
operatoi-s in shares, buying, selling and getting gain. It is really aston- 
ishing to see the changes that have here been wrought within a very brief 
period. The uprising in many kinds of mining stocks within a few weeks 
is surprisingly great, but whether there is a sure foundation for all this 
life and animation it is not for us to say. Fortunes, however, are here 
made and lost in a day, and it becomes all to look sharp before they 
strike. 

Imports of general and staple merchandise thus far in August have 
been of considerable magnitude, as has also been the supply from the 
East by rail. Cargoes from abroad, during the week, embrace the fol- 
lowing, in brief : Ambrose, from Calcutta, to Dickson, DeWoIf & Co., 
with 2,000 bales'Jute, 1,140 bales Grain Sacks, and 95 bales Guuny Cloth, 
etc. ; A. M. Simpson, from Philadelphia, to Wm. T. Coleman & Co., 
with Oil, Nails, Hardwood Lumber, etc.; ship Florence, from New York, 
to Geo. Howes & Co., with general cargo ; from Honolulu, to Williams, 
Blanchard & Co., steamship Wilmington, with 10,000 pkgs. Sugar, 1,000 
bags Paddy, 1,647 bags Rice, 267 bchs. Banannas, etc. ; bark Discovery, 
to same, with 4,500 pks. Sugar ; Wandering Jew, 33 days from Hong- 
kong, to same, with 7,400 bags of Rice, 1,100 pkgs. Oil, 4,070 blocks 
Stone, etc. ; Ger. bk. Christine, from Honolulu, also to Williams, Blanch- 
ard & Co., with Sucrar 7,000 pkgs., Molasses 250 bbls.. Rice 721 basrs ; 
from Honolulu, to John C. Merrill & Co., Kalakua, with Sugar 5,000 
pkgs,, Rice 290 pkgs., etc.; Br. ship Sir John Lawrence, from Calcutta, 
to Balfour, Guthrie &; Co.. with 4..500 bales Jute, etc.; Ger. ship Guten- 
burg, from Greenock, to Forbes Brothers & Co., with Coal, Pig Iron, 
Fine Bricks, and Soda-ash. To these must be added a dozen or more 
ships coal ladened from England and her Colonies. 

The Exports for the week under review, in additionto the dozen car- 
goes of Wheat, etc., elsewhere noted, embrace the Zealandia, cargo for 
Australia and Honolulu, to the former 3, .548 cs. Salmon, 104 flasks Quick- 
silver, etc.; To Honolulu, Sugar 13,-565 lbs., refined, besides Flour, etc. 
The Pacific Mail Steamship Coliraa, for New York via Panama, carried 
of Brandy 2,955 gals.. Base Bullion 763,140 tbs., Pig Lead 1,040,000 lbs.. 
Wine 36,932 gals., etc. The St. Paul, for Liverpool, carried Salmon 
5,451 cases, Apricots 900 cs. canned. Boras 52,665 lbs., Orchilla, 1,491 
bales, etc. 

General Merchandise.— The feature of the market for the week has 
been the offerings at auction of several parcels of Burlap Grain Sacks, 
which in each case were bought up by the combination at a trifle over 
12c., cash. S. L. Jones & Co. also held an auction trade sale of Virginia 
Manufactured Tobacco, being the importation of L. & E. Wertheimer & 
Co. The attendance was large, but the bidding was not at aU spirited, 
and the result was unsatisfactory, sample lots only being sold, the 
balance of the catalogue withdrawn. 

, Bags and Bagging.— Imports this week, 5,700 bales Jute to the Oak- 
land Bag ^Factory. The stock of Burlap Grain Sacks is now under the 
control of a close combination at 12|@13c. cash for Standard 22x36 Bur- 
lap Bags, It is generally thought that higher prices will be reached be- 
fore the close of the year. 

Coffee. — The market is without change. Stocks large. We quote 
Central American Green 16@18c., according to quality. 

CoaL — Imports from New South Wales large and free. Cai^o sales of 
Wallseud at ?6@6 25; Sydney Steam, S5 50@S5 75. 



Chemicals.— There in perhaps a Httlo bettor tone to the market, but 

no SftU'H (tf moment to chronicle. 

Dry Goods. -The market is more or leas demoralized by the uncer- 
tainties attending freights overland by rail 

Ftah.— The schooner May Cjueen is at hand from the Chomnagin Isl- 
andu, with 75.000 Cod to Lynde A. Hough. 

Salmoa. — Thus far in the season we have received a total of 135,000 
coses from all port*", but Oregon haa shipped direct to Liverpool several 
cargoes. Present market for Snot lots is dull at SI 2.5(a;Sl 27i per dozen 
for lib cans, and for 2- lb cans $2 40@$2 50 per dozen. 

Meteds.— There has been of late an active demand for Tin Plate, with 
light imports, cftumng an advance to S7. Pig Iron, Pig Lead, etc., are 
dull and nominal. 

Molasses aud Syrup.— We are in receipt of 250 bbls. Hawaiian 
Molasses; price, 18(a 20c. The Bay and California Sugar Refiners have re- 
duced prices of Golden Syrup to 60c. in 5 gU. ke>^, 52i@55c. in half bbls. 
and bbls. respectively. 

Provisions. — Smoked Meats, Bacon and Hams have been advanced 
during the week about ^c. per lb. Lard ia unchanged; Butter is higher. 
Choice fresh roll dairies, 25@27ic.; fair to good, 15c. to 20c. Cheese is 
plentiful at 8c. to 12k-. 

Quicksilver.- The market is firm and steady at42Ac. 

Rice. — Imports of late have been large and free, and prices have de- 
clined to 5!^c. for Mixed China; Xos. 1 and 2 ditto, 7@7ic.; Hawaiian 
Table, 6i@7c. 

Salt.— The market is dull and depressed, by reason of large stocks and 
heavy supplies en route; prices nominal. 

Sugar. — The refiners have made no change in their rates for six months 
past. Stocks of all kinds, raw and refined, are neavy. Hawaiian may be 
quoted at 6A(ff^8c. ; China, 9c. ; Cube and Crushed, ll.\^'ll.fc. ; Granu- 
lated, ll@l'Hc.; Golden *'C.,"9ic.; Golden " C. D.,"8"Ac.; "D.," 8c. 

Teas. — The market is quiet pending the forthcoming auction sale of 
the new crop. 

Wines. — The outflow of Californian eastward is steadily increasing in 
volume, particularly of the better grades of White and Red to be had of 
Kohler & Frohling, G. Grozinger, and I. Landsberger & Co. The latter 
firm make a specialty of California Sparkling of approved brands. 

Flour. — The export demand is continued, giving our local millers full 
employment. The Golden Age, Golden Gate, Genesee, and Star Mills, 
Vallejo, occupy the front rank in importance. These, with the National 
Mills, supply the market with superfine at S4 40(54 50; extra superfine, 
S4 75(5-5; Bakers and Family extras, 85 50@5 75 ^' 196 lbs. 

Wheat. — Crop reports continue favorable both from Oregon and our 
own State. Exports liberal, as elsewhere noted. Common, SI 40(5)1 50; 
fairto good shipping, SI 60@1 65; choice shipping, SI 70(^1 72A; milling, 
SI 67i@l 77^ ^ ctl. 

Barley. — There is an active inquiry for Chevalier; 300 tons went to 
Australia, per Zealandia, invoiced at SI 75. We quote: Brewing, SI 35 
(51 50; Feed, Sl^l 05 1? ctl.; for choice Dark Coast, 90@95c. 

Hides and Tallow.— Demand good. Dry Hides, 15@16c.; Wet 
Salted, 8@9c. Tallow, 7i(58c.; Refined, 9c. 

Wool.— Stocks light. Good to choice Northern Fleece, 24<^25c.; 
Eastern Oregon, 17(5'19c.; Valley Oregon, 23(5>25c. 

Hops. — Crop prospects are good. Prices nominal. 

Honey. — Supplies very liberal. Strained, 5@Jc.; Comb, 9@12c. 

Potatoes are plentiful and good at |(^l^c. ^ lb. "Sweets, 2^0. 

Oats are in fair demand at SI 45(^S1 75 ^ ctl. 

Com.— Stock very light. Crop prospects good. White, 2|(g2ic., Yel- 
low 2c. ^ lb. Rye.— Small sales at SI 75 ^ ctl ^^ 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Steamers or this Compauy will sail from Broatlway "WTiarf 
for PORTLAND, Oregon), everv 5 days, direct, and for LOS ANGELES, SANTA 
BARBARA, SANTA CRUZ. SAN DIEGO, SAN LUIS OBISPO and other NORTH- 
ERN and SOUTHERN COAST PORTS, leaving SAN FRANCISCO about every 
third day. 

For Day and Hour of Sailing, see the Company's Advertisement in the San Fran- 
cisco Daily Papers. 

Ticket Office, Xo. 214 Mout^omery Street, near Pine. 
GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Agents, 
March 16. No. 10 Market street. 

OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Direct Mail I^ine to Portland and Astoria. --Resrnlar Steam- 
ers to PORTLAND, from San Francisco, leavinpr EVERY FIVE DAYS from 
Folsom-street wharf.— New Iron Steamships GEORGE W. ELDER, CITY OF CHES- 
TER and OREGON, connecting at Portland, Oregon, with Steamers and Railroads 
and their connecting- Stage Lines for all points in Oregon, Washington and Idaho 
Territories, British Columbia and Alaska. Through Tickets at reduced rates to Ta- 
coma, Seattle and all points in Washington Territory. Freight received daily. For 
passage or freight apply at the office of the company. No. 210 Battery street. 
June 22. K. VAN OTERENDORP, Agent. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP CO., 

For Japitii and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nin streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at 
Yokohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC Thursday, May Kith, Friday, Aug. 16th, Saturday, Nov. 16th. 

OCEANIC Tuesday, June 18th, Tuesday, Sept. 17th, Tuesday, Dec. 17th. 

BELGIC Thursday, August 1st, Wednesday, October 16th. 

Cabin Plaiis on Exhibition, and Passage Tioliets for sale at No. 2 New Mont- 
eoraery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific Mail Steamship Company s wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
DAVID D. COLTON, President. July 27. 

FOR NEW YORK. 

Bispatcli liine, from Vallejo-street 'Wharf. 

The new Al Clipper Ship "M. P. Orace," B. r. Wilbnr, 
Commander.— This splendid ship goes into berth with large engagements, and 
will receive Quids Dispatch. For bahince of freight early application will be neces- 
sary ^ GEOKOE HOWES & CO., 302 Cabforma street 
Consignees in New York : Mbbbkb. SOTtON it Co. July 27. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Aug. 10, 1878. 



UWDEIirVERED LETTERS. 
No. 7. 
General John C. Fremont— Sir : A more justly and honorably 
distingufahed man than yourself I have never had the pleasure of ad- 
dressing, and I venture to write to you now simply because yo\ir present 
visit to the State which you almost created seems to justify me in doin" 
so. I wish, sir, to congratulate you upon your return to California, and 
brief — too brief — as your stay in this city is to be, I am confident that your 
advent will be hailed with sincere delight by thousands of our best and 
oldest citizens. The pride and glory of our Pioneers are concentrated in 
their reminiscences of an era, short-lived and gone forever, but never to 
be forgotten — an epoch whose heroes were self-reliant men, competing 
with each ojher by the might of their physical manhood, dropping the 
fox-like attributes of a threadbare commercial community, and living the 
life in an enchanted atmosphere of joyous generosity, of quick blows and 
quicker reconciliations, of warm friendships and of undying recollections. 
Among the adult scholars in the great Dotheboys School of the World 
who broke loose in that wild millennial holiday, you towered as a central 
figure. The golden play-ground in which they rollicked was the prize of 
your intelligence and timely prowess. Had it not been for you they 
might have plodded on in field, shop and ofiBce, till the end of their days; 
for even if gold had been discovered, the placers, under Spanish owner- 
ship and laws, would have offered very little attraction to American en- 
terprise. Therefore those Pioneers who are left — and the dread Reaper 
has sadly thinned their numbers since the brave days of '49 — will, I am 
sure, extend a hearty and unaffected welcome to such an illustrious mem- 
ber of their body as yourself. But it is not alone your invaluable aid in 
winning this State to the Union that entitles you to the affection aud es- 
teem of those who first made their home here. You are, sir, in every 
sense a Pioneer of Pioneers. Years before the annexation of California 
and the discovery of gold, when the vast country stretching from the Mis- 
souri to the Sierra Nevada was a trackless wild, unknown and unex- 
plored, you braved its perils in the interests of geographical science. Un- 
daunted and undismayed you scaled its mountains, threaded its forests, 
swam its rivers, and crept across its illimitable plains, until, in the teeth 
of dangers, difficulties and privations innumerable, you had penetrated 
the inmost recesses of the wilderness and had made a highway of the des- 
ert. Where you had passed thousands followed, but where you first went 
none had gone before. 

I cannot help but wonder, sir, what your feelings must be on the occa- 
sion of your present visit, when you compare our city and State as they 
are now with what they were when first you saw them. To you who 
knew the dreary little hamlet of Yerba Buena, with its few scattered 
adobe hovels, its indolent, listless inhabitants, and its great, sleepy, soli- 
tary bay, the present metropolis of San Francisco, with its hum and bus- 
tle of life and industry, its streets and palaces, and fringe of masts and 
smokestacks, must indeed appear the work of enchantment. And were 
you to traverse the country the transformation would be as complete. 
Northward, to the scene of that noche triste where the redskins slew your 
sleeping companions, the beautiful valley of the Sacramento is dotted 
with farms and villages, and the locomotive outscreams the eagle. South- 
ward, far beyond the spot where you hoisted the stars-and-stripea in defi- 
ance of the braggart Castro, the lordly San Joaquin has a swifter com- 
panion in riie railway. Yet the only mai:ric that has worked the change 
has lain in the grit of the Anglo-Saxon, which you set in motion on that 
momentous day when you turned back upon the Oregon trail and con- 
sented to lead the settlers to victory. 

And now, sir, I will, in conclusion, congratulate you upon your ap- 
pointment to the Governorship of Arizona. Not that it is a reward by 
any means adequate to your just deserts, but Grovernments are never grate- 
ful, and it is, at least, an acknowledgment of your services which you 
may accept with pride and honor. It is, besides, a position for which 
you are eminently qualified. Arizona is said to be the *' coming State," 
it has already given evidence of her wonderful resources, but at the same 
time it is a new country, and you are par excellence the Father of new 
countries. For that reason even the exalted office of President of the 
United States, which yuu came within an ace of obtaining in 1856, could 
not have found a more fitting incumbent, and Arizona certainly ought to 
and doubtless does feel both flattered and gratified that you are chosen 
for her Governor. The Great Pathfinder has at length found a resting- 
place for his wandering feet, and that it may prove a permanent and 
happy home to him and his is the earnest wish of 

Your obedient servant, 

MICHAEIi RBESE, 

The millionaire, lately our denizen, but who left us unwittingly to be 
buried in his native village, was a strange compound of the opposite prin- 
ciples of thrift and prodigality, of avarice and generosity. He could not 
give while living, but he hoarded that he micht be lavish when dead. At 
times even, the innate good that he destined for the future would crop 
out in the present. Witness the purchase of a valuable library for the 
University, which library he feared might fall into other hands; and 
again his purse ever open to those of his relatives that needed assistance, 
as well as to his real friends, who Ivere not numerous, but who never ap- 
plied to him in vain. Michael Reese had fought hard against fortune, 
and having, at last, like the diver, " risen with the pearl," he was loth to 
part with it or any portion of it. He felt the value of money, and that 
any capital taken away from him in his lifetime, in the shape of endow- 
ments, ur charities, would, by loss of interest, so much lessen the accu- 
mulation which was to be distributed after him. Indeed, he made little 
secret of his intentions during his lifetime, and a number of institutions 
knew that they would be remembered, although they could not determine 
the amount. 

For the portrait of the millionaire, from a photograph by Bradley & 
Rulofson, see the Daili/ Gossip, gratuitously issued with to-day's News 



A Queer Election Document— Through the courtesy of F. L. Cas- 
tle, Esg., we have received a copy of a document issued by one of two 
rival European candidates for office in the city of Kabe, Japan; per- 
mission having been granted the European residents of Kabe to choose 
their own municipal officers. The document is interesting, because of its 
exceedingly pungent personality. Unfortunately it is typographically 
unsuited for reprinting in ^these columns; but friends of the News Letter 
are welcome to call and examine it at this office. 



^ THE GASBAG PRICKED. 

Denis Kearney has spoken at Faneuil Hall, and the good people of 
Boston, and of the East generally, must, we think, feel greatly relieved. 
It was always a doubt with them whether the denunciation with which 
the agitator was visited, by the respectable portion of the San Francisco 
Press, was not the result of prejudice. They knew the dangerous doc- 
trines which the Communist aspired to teach, and were the more alarmed 
because his local notoriety seemed to argue that he was a competent 
apostle of his creed. Now they have had an opportunity to judtje of the 
man's quality for themselves, and they seem, if the Eastern Press ex- 
presses their sentiments, to have learned two consoling facts: First, that 
Kearney is all the blackguard we have said he was; second, that society 
will never be revolutionized by an orator of his kidney. It was to be ex- 
pected that Kearney would have exerted himself to the utmost to create 
a favorable impression by his first speech before an Eastern audience — 
that he would soften his senseless vituperation somewhat, and even use a 
few arguments which might entitle him and his cause to the consideration 
of thoughtful men. Instead of this, his speech was the same old sand-lot 
harangue, replete with coarse invective, and utterly devoid of common 
sense. Kearney has boasted that he could get a good speech written for 
himforS2.50. Why did he not pay the money down like a man, and 
then speak like one? For it is evident that this brilliant specimen of 
oratory and logic was mainly original with the agitator: we have heard it 
too often not to know it again. Besides, no penny-a-liner who would 
write a speech for S2.50 would have learning enough to startle the scien- 
tific world with thecurious psychological fact thatall bondholders are "lech- 
erous ;" or did Mister Kearney mean to impute to them the blood-sucking 
propensity of ^eecAea? Possibly, however, the *' great agitator" invested 
S2.50 in those "Ruperts of Debate," " plumed Navarres," " Orion's belts," 
etc. But, if so, they were dear at the price, and we would advise our 
local sand-lotters to instruct their leader not to waste any more of his 
"traveling expenses " on second-hand goods. Again, it was to be expected 
that Kearney, who railed so at professional politicians, would at least keep 
himself clear of them. Yet from the moment of his arrival he is hand 
and glove with Ben Butler, the most unscrupulous political trickster of 
the day, and who, as soon as his purpose is served, will most assuredly 
kick the Communist off like a worn-out boot. Kearney had an opportu- 
nity to distinguish himself in a bad cause ; he has ea:tinguished himself 
instead. But what could we expect — a silk purse can't be made from a 
bow's ear. 

GO NORTH, YOUNG MAN! 

It baa not been the custom in San Francisco to speak in very favora- 
ble terms of the country lying north of us. A touch of California pride 
has enthused the honest citizen, while an eye to profit has guided the 
land speculator; and the daily press, always aggravating local prejudices, 
and incapable of broad views of the commerciaJ destiny of our metropo- 
lis, has looked with incredulous eyes upon the splendid expanse of country 
stretching away up to the western gate of the Polar Sea. 

The News Letter looks upon the Pacific Coast as the commercial em- 
pire over which San Francisco must rule. A single glance at the map 
will show the superlative power of this city. Nature has decreed that 
there should be but one great city on the western shore of the American 
continent. Expansion north or south can only inure to its benefit. New 
York is not so clearly marked as the central metropolis of the Atlantic 
seaboard, as San Francisco is of the Pacific. This is the focal center of 
wealth and power this side of the Rocky Mountains, and its destiny is be- 
yond any temporary policy, and above all local influences. The power of 
man cannot change the future of this city, and this perhaps may prove a 
clog to its development, and warp its growth for a time. 

Washington Territory and Oregon possess vast tracts of good land, that 
await the hand of the husbandman. An abundance of timber and a regu- 
lar rainfall render them, to some extent, more attractive than our own 
State. The Indian is now giving way to the white man, for the result of 
the war being waged must be the closer confinement of the Red man and 
the relinquishment of large reservations to the grasp of the Caucasian 
race, under the pre-emption and homestead laws. Though we of to-day 
may shrink from the horrors of a war with savaofes, and dilletante writers 
delight to alarm the timid with the pictures of distress in the afflicted dis- 
tricts, history reminds us that the whole American continent was opened 
to the Caucasian race under just such circumstances, and the regions 
where the aborigines made the most determined stand have ever been the 
most favored by Nature. In addition to these we have Alaska, which 
Col. De Alma tells us is a land much underestimated, abounding in min- 
eral wealth, and a good grain country. 

British Columbia, though not under our flag, falls within our commer- 
cial dominion, and must contribute to our traffic. 

The future line of development is north of us, for there is nothing south 
that can attract the pioneer, whatever may be its future under the aus- 
pices of capital. If San Francisco has any interest in the progress of the 
Pacific Coast beyond our own peninsula, she has every reason to direct 
the attention of our own people, and that of the older States beyond the 
Rocky Moimtains, to the North Pacific coast. 



HE WANTED NOTHING. 

Grant has recently been interviewed at Hamburg, and it is wonderful 
to discover how all his honors have been forced upon him. He did not 
want to go to West Point, but was compelled to by his father. He never 
went into battle willingly. He don't want to command another army. 
He don't want to see another military parade, and told the Duke of Cam- 
bridge so when asked to review the troops at Aldershott. He only re- 
entered the army when the rebellion broke out by reason of duty, having 
no thought of pay. He never desired an increase of rank. He opposed 
being made Lieutenant-General, but found that it was all right when he 
assumed command of the Army of the Potomac. He never wanted the 
Presidency, and has never forgiven himself for resigning his commission 
in the army to accept it, but it could not be helped. He owed his honors 
to the Republican party, and if his name could aid it he was bound to 
accept. He did not refer to the fact that he never wanted any of the. 
cigars, bull pups, etc., with which he has been presented; but we believe 
such to be the case, and that they were accepted only by reason of his 
wish to — oblige his friends. 

Artistic Novelties, manufactured from California quartz, at Ander- 
son & Randolph's, corner Montgomery and Sutter streets. | 



The Special Organ of "Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Co."— Fred. Marriott, Patentee. 



Pric* pw Ceyr. 10 Caati.) 



ESTABUSHXD JULT. 20. 1856. 



[Anniud Snbsorlptiont 95. 



9^ ■^•'•«® 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING DnXEESTS OF CALIFOBiaA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 29. 



SAN FEANOISOO. SATUEDAY. AUG. 17, 1878. 



No. 5. 



Oflio« of the San Francil»co News Iietter, SKerchant Street, 

No*. 607 to 615, S»n Francisco. 

GOLD BARS— 890@i)15— Silver Bars— 6@16 ^ cent, disc Treasury 
Notes are selling at par. Buj-ing, 99J. Mexican Dollars, 7@7i per 
per cent. nominaL Trade Dollars, 2^(2 3^ per cent, discount. 

MS" Exchange on New York, 4-10(5^^ per cent, for Gold ; Currency, 100. 
On London, Bankers, 49i^i.(o49i; Commercial, 49|d.@50d. Paris, 
sight, 5 franca per dollar. Telegrams, J@| per cent. 

aa- Latest price of Gold at New York, Aug. 16th, at 3 P.M., 100.\. Latest 
price of Sterling, 483^@487^. 

J&' Price of Money here, f@l per cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
open market, l@li. Demand active. 

FBICES OF LEADING STOCKS AND GOVEBNMENT BONDS. 

San FR.O.-C18C0 Aug. 16, 1878. 



Stocks and Bonds. 
U. S. Bonds. 5-203 1867-03, 

LegTil Tender Notes 

S. F. City JC Co. B'da, Os, '63 

S. F. City Bonds, 7s 

Sacramento City Bonds. . . . 
Yubft County Bonds, 8s. . . . 
San Mateo Co. Bonds, 7b. . . 

S. F. Gas Light Co 

Katioiial G. B'k & Trust Co. 
Spring Valley Water Co. . . . 



Bid. 


Asked , 


10« 


1061 


m 


99it 


104 




107 


— 


28 


30 


100 




102 


104 


94 


94J 


75 


80 


94 


941 


Breckii 


•RIDGE & 



Stocks and Bonds. 

Omnibus Railroad Co 

Central Railroad Co 

N. B. and Mission R. R. Co, 
Front St..M. & O. R. R. Co. 
Fireman's Fund Ins. Co. . . . 

Union Insurance Co 

Pacific Bank 

The Bank of California 

Central Pacific Railroad 



Bid. 
20 
63 



Asked 
25 



110 
115 



Yost, Brokers, 304 Montgomery' street. 



THE STOCK MARKET. 

The excitement in mining stocks is somewhat abated, and the volume 
of business has materially fallen off, though prices for leading stocks are 
generally well sustained. Sierra Nevada continues to be the main object 
of attention, and shows a gradual but steady advancement under favora- 
ble news from the mine. The incline is still going down and will reach 
the 2200-foot level in about a week, when cross-cuttiug will be commenced 
on this leveL This fact alone should impart an additional stimulus to the 
stock, and excite a lively demand for all of the north end securities. From 
the most authentic sources we learn that the present ore development is 
making south into the Uniou, and that the incline will reach the 2200-foot 
level at a point about the middle of the Union ground. The manifest dis- 
position to depress Ophir and Mexican throughout the recent upheaval is 
undoubtedly a part of the programme to divert attention from Union 
Con., which, from present indications, will take the major slice of the de- 
velopment now being uncovered. Preparations are being made to continue 
the sinking of the north Con. Virginia shaft, when a vigorous prospecting of 
the Union ground will be in order. Julia has been a favorite stock during 
the week, and shows a marked advance under the promise of a speedy re- 
sumption of work in the crosscuts. The water has been entirely removed and 
crosscuts will be started at once, which should reach the ledge sometime 
during next week. At a meeting of the Trustees of the Julia resolutions 
were passed, recommending an alliance with the Sutro Tunnel whereby a 
connection could be made with the Julia shaft, on the 1,540-foot level. 
This arrangement will materially facilitate operations at the mine, and 
greatly economize the present expensive system of working. Belcher has 
maintained its price throughout the week, with a good demand existing 
for the stock. Work on the 2,360-foot level is progressing finely, and the 
prospects are said to be most encouraging. Crown Point has not been so 
well sustained. At present there seems to be no adjustment of the diffi- 
culties between the Alta and the Justice, but we are informed that all 
complications will soon be overcome. The Alta is looking particularly 
well, and, with the removal of the present obstacles, a large advance must 
take place. Of the outside stocks, Bodie is the principal attraction, but, 
under the realizing of large blocks, the stock shows a decline of S8 from 
the highest price reached. The mine continues to look well, though the 
question of title threatens to be a serious oue for stockholders: Manhat- 
tan continues on the up-grade, under the promise of an early resumption 
of dividends. At the close the general market was quite strong, and 
leading stocks were in good demand. 

To Liverpool, per ' ' Xiochee. " — This ship has been cleared by G. W, 
McNear, carrying honey 21,119 lbs., salmon 500 cases, and wheat 54,000 
ctls.; valued at $90,000. ^^^^ 



^^ Contributors willploase renieynber that tve do not undertake to 
return rejected ma nuacripts , and no contribution will be paid for un- 
less on a bargain made in advance. The spirit of essential things only 
is requiredf 7iot the dull carcass of sensational or subordi7iate mat- 
ter, Jiy bearing these facts in mitult annoyance -will be saved, 

LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS OF FACT AND THOUGHT. 

Latest from the Merchant's Exchange. — New York, Aug. 16th, 
1878.— Gold opened at lOOg; 11 A.ai., at lOOg ; 3 p.m, at 100§. United 
States Bonds — Five-twenties of 1867. lOSJ ; 1881, 106J. Sterling Ex- 
change, 4 85@4 89^, short. Pacific Mail, 16. Wheat, SI 15@51 28, strong. 
Western Union, 90^. Hides, steady, fair demand, 19^. Oil — Sperm, 
86@88. Winter Bleached, 97® 105. Whale Oil, 40 @ 43; Winter 
Bleached, 49@56. Wool— Spring, fine, 20@28 ; Burry. 10@14 ; Pulled, 
28@38 ; FaU CHps, 14@18 ; Burry, 14@1B. London, Aug. 16th.— Liver- 
pool Wheat Market, IDs. 3d.@103. 7d. Club, 10s. 6d.@10s. lOd. United 
States Bonds, 107i@105i ; 4 P.M., 108@108J. Consols, 95 1-16 @ 95 3- 16, 
94 15-16@95^. 

Beerbohm'a Telegram.— London and Liverpool, Aug. 16th, 1878. 
Floating Cargoes, firm; held higher; the export demand for France has 
recommenced. Cargoes on Passage, steady; Mark Lane Wheat, firm; 
Imports of Wheat into U. K. during past week, 125 — 130,000; Red Winter 
off Coast, 473. 6d.; Imports of Flour into U. K. during last week, 40 — 
45,000; Weather in England, wet; Liverpool Spot Wheat, quiet; Cali- 
fornia Club, lOs. 7d.@103. lOd.; California Average, 10s. 3d.@103. 7d.; 
Red Western Spring, 93. 2d.@9s. lOd.; No. 2 Spring off Coast, 44s.; Cal- 
ifornia off Coast, 503. 6d.; California just shipped, 47s.; California 
Nearly Due, 503. New York, Aug. 16th,— Gold, |; Sterling Exchange, 
85@89i; Consols, 95 1-16@95 3-16. 

The Beheading of Hoedel.— Berlin, August 16th. — Emil Hoedel,who 
attempted the assassination of Emperor William, May 14th, in the avenue 
Unter den Linden, was beheaded this morning in the court yard of the new 
prison. The Imperial warrant decreeing that justice should take its 
course was signed on the 8th of the present month. Hoedel's age was 
about 21. On his trial he protested that he had not intended to take the 
life of the Emperor, but sought to sacrifice his own life in a public manner 
in order to create sympathy for the suffering people. But numerous wit- 
nesses testified that Hoedel leveled his weapon direct at the Emperor. 

Great Britain. —London and Liverpool Markets.— London, Aug. 
16th.— Silver. 52id.; Consols, 94 15-16@95J; Bonds, 67s, 106|; Ten-for- 
ties, 108. Erie, 17^. Liverpool, Aug. 16th. — Cotton, quiet; Uplands, 
6 9-16; Orleans, 6 11-16— sales, 7,000 bales; Breadstuffs, firm; Wheat, 10s. 
3d.@103. 7d. for Average California White; IDs. 6d.@10s. lOd. for Cali- 
fornia Club; 93.@98. 8d. for Red Western Spring; 98. 4d.@93. 8d. for 
Red Winter. Receipts of Wheat the past three days, 30,000 quarters; 
American, 23,000. 

Parliament Prorogued— The Queen's Speech. — London, August 
16th. — The session of Parliament was prorogued to-day by the Queen 
until the 2d of November, 1878. In the Royal speech which was read on 
the occasion, the Queen congratulates Parliament on the conclusion of 
peace by the Berlin Congress. The Cyprus treaty is referred to as a 
guarantee of British independence and a pledge of reform. The conduct 
of the troops is hig hly praised. 

Thomas K Morton, late commander of the S. S. South Carolina, 
has left the employ of the P. M. S. S. Co. and accepted a position with 
Wm. P. Clyde. We congratulate the Pacific Mail S. S. Co. on this cir- 
cumstance. 

As "we alTvays said would be the case, the dissatisfied stockholders 
of the Day mine have discovered that everything connected with its man- 
agement is as it should be, and so state in a card in another column. 



W. M. Lent holds 10,000 shares in the Bodie mine, purchased at 40 
cents. The stock was quoted this week at $45. 

France. — Paris, August 16lh.— Specie in the Bank of France has in- 
creased 5,300,000 fra ncs the past week. 

J. J. McLaughlin's letter of Aug. 7th, from New Orleans, is entirely 
too local, and the ne ws contained therein has been an ticipated by wii-e. 

London, An^. 16, 1878.— Latest Price of Conaols« 95 1-16 ® 9-16. 



Printed and Publlahed by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to ,615 Merchant Street, San FranclBCO, OaJlfomia, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Aug. 17, 1878. 



KEARNEY DRAMATIZED. 

[The foUowring fragment of an unpublished drama is pretty good, but 
several of the most striking metaphors used are clearly stolen from oiu- 
own original, silver-mounted, back-action orator, Mishter Karney. Why 
doesn't Denis patent hia " Kuperts," " Orions," "Navarres," etc. — Ed. 
News Letter. J 

ilfact£«#— Stands Boston where it did? 

Sosse— Alas, poor city ! 

Almost afraid to know itself ! It cannot 

Be called our mother, but D. Kearney's; nothing 

But who knows nothing, is once se'en to smile. 

The laymen talk of hell, promiscuous-like, 

And one of Joseph Cook's best patchwork quilts 

Has been cut up to make collar and cuffs 

Tor a wild Irishman's checked shirt, in which. 

Without a coat, without a neckerchief, 

Denis harangues and cusses ! _ 

Macd. — O, relation ! 

Too nice, and yet too true ! 

Mai. — What is the newest grief ? 

fioss€— That of an hoijr's age doth hiss the speaker; 

Each minute teems a new one. 

Macd. — Where's Durant ? 

iJosse— Quite overcome with base ingratitude. 

And weeping over Tappan. 

Bedzehuh — Where is ray servant Butler ? 

Rosse — Coming from Brighton, on your Majesty's service, 

The news of poor Durant's unhappiness 

Met him half-way. The tearful Somerby 

Poured forth the tale of misplaced confidence 

And saintly virtue cheated. Dire amazement 

Possessed his soul; ataxy locomotor 

Clutched at his curving le§;s; plumb down he dropped. 

And groveled on the MiU-dam, damning Tappan. 

Somerby groaned. Amen ! 

Beelzebub — Be it their comfort 

We are coming thither. California hath 

Sent us great Kearney and the gifted Brown. 

Carl Brown. — And yet I know that Mars still holds his course. 

That Vaynus with O'Ryan whirl through space. 

The blazing, bold O'Ryan! XTranus 

And Jupiter are flashing in the sky. 

The bright and guiding gleam of the North Star 

Is there, you bet! And when the nateral forces. 

Centrifugal, are whirling me and Dennis 

Into the presence of the night, we see there 

Our bright companion worlds traveling like us 

In shining splendor on their endless round. 

Thus is it in a movement of this kind; 

We know the workingmen are thar — or tharabout — 

We know they are as true as stars in heaven. 

And wiU, when called upon to show themselves. 

Appear in beauty, majesty and power. 

And bring a message all of love and greeting 

Por Butler, lesser than Macbeth, yet greater, 

Piery, unconquerable, chivalrous, white-feathered 

Navarre of the rostrum, Rupert of debate 

And powder-boat of war! 

Beelzebub— There, that will do. 

I neither drink nor smoke nor chew tobacco, 

But here's an order on the Sherman House 

Por drinks and weeds ad libitum. Go, Brown, 

Imbibe, and then compose another speech 

To please fastidious Boston. 

Brown — Joseph Cook 

Strides by Lake Geoi^e, or gossips with the ghost 

Of Ethan Allen at Ticonderoga. 

But I have pooled his issues in one pot, 

Covered it up and use it for a dye-pot 

To color and baptize our eloquence. 

Beelzebub — Gentlemen, you may go plumb to hell! 

{Exeunt Omnes.) — Springfield Eepuhlican. 



OUR QTTARANTINE. 

The juat made regular Annual Report of the Quarantine Of- 
ficer of this port. Dr. William P. McAllister, will be read with 
great interest in view of the terrible scourge of yellow fever now devasta- 
ting Southern Atlantic ports. In addition to this the fearful plagues of 
cholera and small-pox have been, and are now, epidemic in parts of India, 
China, and Japan, and it has been due to the untiring and exceptionally 
euei^etic devotion to duty on the part rf the above-named oflicer that we 
have escaped infection for the past year, and are at this moment free from 
imported epidemic. As stated in his report, the duties of the Quarantine 
Officer have been performed under the most adverse circumstances. 
Although the commerce of San Prancisco for the present and coming sea- 
son will exceed that of any port in the United States, the only means of 
boarding incoming vessels at the disposal of our Quarantine Officer is a 
small row boat, which not only entails exhausting toil upon its crew when 
the arrivals are many in heavy weather, but is often exceedingly danger- 
ous. Though Dr. McAllister does not so state in his report, we are cogni- 
zant of several occasions when his life has been more than jeopardized 
upon this notoriously treacherous bay for small boats. Nowhere are 
deaths from capsizing more numerous. As a matter both of personal and 
public safety, he should be supplied with the steam launch required at 
once; especially as under the new law his office is self-sustaining. Any 
delay on the part of the authorities to afford proper facilities for keeping 
at bay the plagues now threatening us from afar might easily lead to re- 
sults criminal in their gravity. 



Falkner, Bell & Go's "Wool, Hide and Live Stock Circular says: 

Since our circular of the 9th instant the market for wool has been stag- 
nant, and sales difficult to effect at a decided decline in quotations. Our 
telegraph advices from Boston quote an exceedingly quiet market. 



SIQNAIi SERVICE METEOROLOGICAL REPORT. WEEK 
ENDIIT3 Aira. 15. 1878, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

JSiffhest and Lotvest Sa,rometeT, 



Rrl. 9. Sat. 10. Sun. 11 Mon 12, Tue. 13 Wed 14 Thrl5 



29.92 
29.85 



19. 8S 29.86 29.84 29.83 29.84 

29. 85 29. 79 29. 78 29. 79 29. 78 

Maximum and Minimutn Titer jnottteter* 



29.84 
29.78 



71.3 I 80.3 I 



SW. 



72 I 63 I 63 i 67 I 63 I 64 1 
65 I 61 I 63 I 53 I 55 I 65 I 

Mean Daily Sumlditif. 

78.7 I 80 1 S5.3 | 84.7 | 

Frevailing Wind. 

SW. I SW. I SW. 

Wind — Miles Traveled. 

264 I 253 I 270 

State of Weather. 

Clear I Clear. ] Clear | Pair. | Cloudy. 1 Fair. | Cloudy. 

Mainfall in Ttoenty-four Soura, 

III III 

TotalJRain During Season beginniing Jxtly 1, 387S... .01 inches. 



SW. 



257 



1 



I 



I SW. 
I 287 



I SW. 
I 260 



SANTIART NOTES. 
Eighty-eight deaths have occurred this week, against 84 for the cor- 
responding week last year — 48 males and 40 females ; 7 Chinese ; 3 sui- 
cides; 24 under 1 year. Zymotic disease is on the increase, viz : 5 deaths 
from diphtheria, 8 typhoid fever, 7 infantile cholera, 1 whooping cough. 
The extraordinary number of 15 children died from inanition. There 
were 3 deaths from Bright's disease, 2 cancer, 9 consumption, and 1 pneu- 
monia; 1 person died from acute mania, and 1 from malignant pustule. 

BOGUS PRESCRIPTIONS. 
"We have often heard of bogus mines, but we have only just learned 
that there are bogus prescriptions. We have already pointed out the va- 
riety of methods by which a secret conspiracy is entered into between 
physicians and druggists to defraud their victims. The bogus prescriptioa 
is the last invention. The physician, who is in collusion with a druggist, 
and bargains to receive a percentage on the profits, arranges a series of 
bogus drugs and compounds which are quite incomprehensible to respecta- 
ble druggists, and so force the patient to go to a certain store, and at the 
same time convey a peculiar sense of mysterious importance to the pa- 
tient. Instead of being composed of the ordinary remedies, the bogus 
prescription contains a mixture of Ppt., a powder of L.L.D., an elixia 
of A. S. S. , and a pill of Kogue, which the druggist can compound ac- 
cording to his own formula, or leave out altogether, should it be so ar- 
ranged. Hitherto we have not published the names of the physicians and 
druggists who carry on this nefarious practice, but let them beware. 



T' 



THE ALTA CALIFORNIA. 

Ifae Daily Alta California is tbe oldest, larg'est and most 

reliable commercial and home newspaper published in California. 

Delivered by Carriers 15 cents per Week. 

Single Copies Scents. 

Bv Mail, U. S. Postage PAm : 

One Tear EIGHT DOLLARS. | Six Months FOUR DOLLARS. 

The Weehly Alta is the best paper to send abroad, containinc:, as it does, a 
full resume of the news and commerce of the Pacific Coast, while the choice literary 
selections and produce reports make it a welcome visitor to the farm houses of the 
Pacific Coast. 

SuBscBiPTios Price, per Mail, U. S. Postaoe Fatd. 

One Tear $2 75. | Six Months $1 50. 

Single Copies 10 cents. 

F. MacCRELLISH & CO., 529 California street, 
Aug. 17. San Francisco, C alifornia. 

REMOVED. 

Tbe Old Establisbed Steam Gas Fitting- and Plamblngr Es- 
tablishment of J. K. PRIOR has been removed from 730 Montcomery street to 
his new five-story-and-a-basement building, NO. 1128 MARKET STREET and 21 
TURK STREET, where a complete assortment of new patterns of Gas Fixtures and 
Plumbing Material are offered at greatly reduced rates. Messages sent by American 
District Telegraph Company free. All jobbing promptly attended to. Established 
1852. [Aug. 17.] J.K. PRIOR. 



0. L. Tlionipson, 



THOMPSON & CO., 



D. W. 0. Thompsoa. 



Banbers and Brokers, Xo. 431 California street. Dealers in 
Exchange, Bulhon, Silver, Currency and Government Securities. Drafts fur- 
nished on all parts of the world. Collections made, Bonds and Stocks bought and 
sold on commission. Will continue the business of the Bank of Commerce. [Aug. 17. 



A. M. OILMAN, 



Importer and Wholesale I^iqnor Dealer, SOS California 
street, offers for sale Fine Old Bourbon and Rye Whiskies, Brandies, vintage of 
1820 and 1830, Old Port and Sheny Wines, Still and" Sparkling Wines, etc. Agent for 
the Celebrated CACHET BLANC CHAMPAGNE. Sole Agent for MILLS' STOMACH 
BITTERS. Aug. 17. 

BEAUTIFUL RESIDENCE AT MENLO PARK FOR SALE. 

Honse, Furniture and liive Stock for Sale, with the prop- 
erty, consisting of six and one-quarter acres. Orchard, Vine^'ard, choice 
Shrubbery and Flowers, Fountain, Fish Pond, Croquet Grounds, etc., and an abund- 
ance of Water. Property surrounded by the finest Country Seats at Menlo Park. 
Apply to THOMAS YOUNG, 424 Montgomery street. Aug. 17. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Enreha Consolidated mining: Company, Xevada 
Block, Room No. 37, San Francisco, August 15, 1878.— At a meeting of the 
Board of Directors of the above-named Company, held this day, a Dividend (No. 34) 
of Three Dollars per share was declared, payable on Tuesday, August 20th, 1878. 
Transfer Books closed until 21st instant. 
Aug. 17. W. W. TRAYLOR. Secretary. 

SAMUEL M'KEE, 

Stocfabrober and Dealer In Stock Privilegpes, 326 Pine 
street, San Francisco. We buy and sell Stocks for Cash or on Marijin. Stock 
Privileges a Specialty. A pamphlet" explaining the whole system of Stock Specula- 
tion free on application. Aug. 17. 



Aug. 17, 1878. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



SWXET PEACR 



•' Wc huTf hroacht yoa back i>«»ce." 
tuJt, July U\ 1S7S. 



-lA'rd Jifiia>ni/Mdrt S/H«ch to tA4 iluitt- 




AiL now, aweet Penr^! Stretch 
out thy enrwy winK. 
With miiul fli'ht Hy all tho 
wkle world o'er, 
Let thy aweet voice with joy- 
ous tidtDi^ fling, 
That thou art ruler of the 
wcrld onco niuro. 

In token send the olive-branch abroad — 
Send tender wonU and messages of love ; 

Dr>- uow the t<*ivrs— Remove the weary load 
ITiat grief around the bleedintj heart hath 



Tho buRle's blast, the deadly cannon's roar, 
The clash of arms and ^vajje shout shall 
cejise 
And all the clang of war bo heard no more, 
For thou art come to reig:n, sweet loving 
Peaco ! 

Now youn^' and old with merry hearts shall 
dwell. 
The pijw and tabor soand their simple 
strain. 
Full plenty teeming from the earth shall tell 
That thou art come to claim thy own 
again. 

Let now once more the stalwart and the strong 

Renounce the cannon and the fiery sword, 
That they may listen to thy silvery son}?. 

And laud thee as their chieftain and their lord. 

Let all the buddiujj earth look bright and glad, 

The meadows like a flowery garden bloom, 
The mountain slope, with rich green verdure clad, 

With purple heather and with yellow bloom. 

Let thy glad spirit rule the mighty throng! 

Let every nation now its mirth bells ring. 
Let all men sing the ever-joyous song 

That shepherds heard the herald angels sing. 

And flocks and herds shall join the song of praise, 
Full hearts shall sing of triumi>b and renown. 

For with thy coming come bright halcyon days. 
And on thy brow shall rest the laurel crown! 

— Front Loncbn Fun. 



CYPRUS. 

Next to inquiring what are the natural features of his new territory, 
the modern Briton exercises his mind on the great question of What are 
the ladies like ? The Pall Mall shaU reply: 

"The Cj-prian woman is a curious compound of fascinations and oddi- 
ties. Seen at her best, on one of those innumerable saints' days when she 
does no. work beyond tricking herself out in fine clothes, and assisting her 
mother to dispense hospitality, she looks like a masquerade heroine, what- 
ever her station. She weaves up her hair with gold coins, t\vists it, plaits 
it, and contrives, with a red and yellow kerchief, a head-dress, which 
looks like a turban, but is made top-heavy by being surmounted with an 
embroidered muffin cap and tassel. She wears baggy breeches, sky blue 
or pink, which descend to the knee, the rest of the legs and feet being 
bare, except when, to honor company, she reluctantly dons a pair of ca- 
bouches, in which she feels uncomfortable. She is generally fat, and w^ars 
a short jacket, pnifusely braided, which does not reach to her waist ; she 
rouges and whitens her creamy complexion till it looks like the face of a 
wax image ; and paints her eyebrows deep black, and, by some cunning 
pencil touches at the corners of her eyes, contrives to make them twice 
their size. Then she feels happy, and giggles when complimented. She 
cannot read or write, but she can sing, play on a triangidar guitar, and 
spin round in a fantastic dance, which takes her breath away, and makes 
hercry'Hoo!" while the stranger who watches her turns giddy from 
sympathy. . ....... 

On working days the Cyprian girl dresses loosely in cotton breeches and 
chemise, and lets her hair fall down her back, tying it just below the 
neck with a string of beads. She is surprisingly active, despite her 
plumpness, and races about after goats, pigs and fowls with a fleetness 
which would do credit to a boy. If of a marriageable a^e she will not 
beg, but at sight of a stranger halloos to her younger sisters to come forth 
and claim backsheesh, the which having been duly obtained (for those 
little Greeks are wonderful coaxers), she levies her share, which is ex- 
pended in buying finery of the peddler." 



The pieces of a wrecked boat, and a few figures scribbled thereon, 
were the principal clue that led to the arrest of the murderers of Mr. 
Tullis. " Murder will out," and no matter how carefully every evidence 
of| crime may be destroyed, there is nearly always a little something left 
that will be sure, sooner or later, to expose those who may venture to take 
the life of a fellow being. 

In reply to a letter from M. A. B., San Luis Obisbo, in which we are 
asked for information respecting the cost of the Modoc war. we can only 
say that while we possess no accurate information on this subject, we be- 
lieve our correspondent's estimate of millions to be correct. The idea of 
any war costing the Government only §150,000 is simply absurd. 

A young lady of Oonstitucion, Chili, has eloped with a pair of sweet- 
hearts, carrying with her S600 belonging to her father ; just S300 and half 
a bride apiece for the enterprising swains. — South Pacific Times. 



MARINE INTELLIGENCE. 



ARRIVALS AND CLKAUANChiS AT TIIK PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO, 
THB WEEK EXIUNG AUGUST 16, 1878. 



ARHIVAIiS. 



DATB. 



A'gll 

.. 11 
.. 13 
.. i:t 
.. la 
.. i.s 
.. 13 
.. 14 
.. 14 
.. 16 



Hark Vir^'inia 

Hark Ocean Kovor 

St'r Gniiindn 

StV Nfwlieni , 

Ship Miirliilian 

itark Ilaniiiidius . .. . 
Soh'r Olii ia Schultze 
St'r City .tf Sydney.., 

Ship Sclenu 

Bark Bohemia , 



UA8TKK. 



Minnimaiiii . 
Wilkingai).. , 
Connolly . .. 

Melz^'er 

Johnson 

Dcason 

SchulLzo ... 
Dearborn. .. 

Benson 

Otta , 



WIIRIlll fROH. 



CONHIONKKB. 



Hambur? H. Uatzur & Co. 

Guayaquil Itulfour, Guthrie & Co. 

['aiiaiua Williams, lllnnuhard in, Co. 

Ouaymas John Hcrminf^ham. 

Newcastle A. U. Mooro. 

Newcastle Uickson, Do Wolf 6i Co. 

San Podro Alastor. 

Sydney Williams, Itlanohard & Co. 

Nowcastlo .. . . Dicks-tn. Do Wulf & Co. 
La Libcrtad. . . Kortid Bros. &, Co. 



CliBABANCES. 



DATK. 


VESSEL. 


MASTER. 


WnEKB BOUND. 


BY WHOM CLKAKED. 


A\' 10 


St'r Citv of Panama... 


Seaburv 


Victoria 


Williams. Blanchard & Co. 


.. 10 


airk Abbey Town .... 


Shapland . . . 


(Jueenatown . . 


Starr & Co. 


.. 12 


Ship Peterborough 


Gardiner . . . 


Havre 


Dickson. De Wolf & Co. 


.. 1-2 


itark Isle of Bute 


Cavell 


L-^ndon 


Parrott & Co. 


., IS 


Ship Mystic Belle 


Davis 


Calloo 


J. W. Graced Co. 


.. i:: 


Bark Kalakaua 


Jenks 


Honolulu 


J. C. Merrill & Co. 


.. U 


Ship Angenma 

Bark Lochdoon 


Harwood.. . . 
Cowning 


Cork 




.. 14 


Cork 




.. 15 


Bark Earl Derbv 


Colquhoun , 


Cork 


Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 


.. IS 


Ship Ilarwarden Cast'e 


Matthews. . . 


(iueenstown . . 


0. W. McNear. 


. . IS'Ship Lochec 


Kean 


Liverpool 


G. W. McNcar. 



CLERICAL RAXTENS. 
I bappened to be passing along Regent-street one afternoon lately, 
when I ^"as attracted by a crowd that was blocking up the pavement be- 
fore Chapel-court. Emerk-ing from the court, and hanging about the exit, 
was a stranjre gathering of men and women. Most of the men were clean 
shaven, with that blue tinge about the cheeks which characterizes priests 
and actors, or had long tangled beards. In almost every case they had 
large prominent noses, thick lips, and very low, receding foreheads. They 
wore a long sort of gaberdines, with a piece of linen about their necks, 
but with a singular absence of linen about their ^T-ists, as though they 
had dispensed with shirts, and on their heads they had round, slouching 
felt hats. Never in my life did I see human beings in which all the in- 
tellectual faculties were, judging from the shape of their heads, the sharp 
angularity of their features, and the hungry sensuousness of their mouths, 
80 little developed. Talking to these dirty-looking ravens were youths, 
who evidently seemed proud to address them, while dowdy-looking 
women, most of whom had prayer-books with great crosses on them, rep- 
resented the fair sex. These ravens, I learnt on inquiry, were a Confra- 
ternity of Churchmen, and they had been celebrating their mysteries in a 
chapel up the court. For some time I stood looking on. Close by me 
were two of the ravens discussing \vith each other. "I am," said one, 
" in the Fens. When I first went there I only had one penitent ; I now 
have seven." "I have fourteen," replied the other raven. *'And do 
they coiifess regularly ?" asked the first. "Kegidarly," answered raven 
number two, and number one ceased to boast of his seven penitents, but 
turned the conversation on his creature comforts. He had lunched, he 
said, early, and only had two chops, so the pair agreed to go to the Cafe 
Koyal to dine. It is a melancholy thing to know that this flock of un- 
clean birds is spread over the country, and under the guise of clergymen 
of the Church of England, are corrupting the minds of modest and decent 
village girls with the bestial questions that they have learnt in "The 
Priest in Absolution," and then crowing over each other in the streets of 
the metropolis about their penitents, with all the pride of Don Juan 
boasting of his mille e tre. Any father of a family who